Heritage – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 00:39:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Heritage – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Children of SCV Discover ‘Calaveras Literarias’ Thanks to Hispanic Heritage Month https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/children-of-scv-discover-calaveras-literarias-thanks-to-hispanic-heritage-month/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/children-of-scv-discover-calaveras-literarias-thanks-to-hispanic-heritage-month/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 00:39:05 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/children-of-scv-discover-calaveras-literarias-thanks-to-hispanic-heritage-month/ “Koonex, koonex, palexen” the children sang while singing a children’s song in Mayan conducted by Gloria Arjona during the Calaveras Literarias. “What you say in Mayan is, ‘Don’t be lazy, let’s dance, because death is coming and we have to enjoy life,'” Arjona explained, noting that whether they are young or old, the song calls […]]]>

“Koonex, koonex, palexen” the children sang while singing a children’s song in Mayan conducted by Gloria Arjona during the Calaveras Literarias.

“What you say in Mayan is, ‘Don’t be lazy, let’s dance, because death is coming and we have to enjoy life,'” Arjona explained, noting that whether they are young or old, the song calls people to be active.

Families gathered at the Newhall Community Center on Sunday to sing songs like this one called Calaveras Literarias in Latin American culture, a term that includes songs, stories and poems written to celebrate Dia de los Muertos, or the day of the dead.

Dr Gloria Arjona distributes materials to a child on Sunday attending the Calaveras Literarias event hosted by the Santa Clarita Public Library. October 10, 2021. Bobby Block / The signal.

The event was hosted by the Santa Clarita Public Library with a REFORMA Noche de Cuentos mini-grant, which enabled the library to enhance its Spanish-language cultural programs during Hispanic Heritage Month, according to librarian Morgan Lazo.

The library hopes programs like this will help continue the success of other outdoor programs held over the summer, Lazo said.

“They were a huge success, so we wanted to conserve some of that outside energy,” Lazo added. “There are also several different departments in the library and the learning center that were able to collaborate, so we are really happy to be able to re-enter the community. “

Dr Gloria Arjona is leading the Calaveras Literarias event hosted by the Santa Clarita Public Library on Sunday. October 10, 2021. Bobby Block / The signal.

Calaveras Literarias are typically written in metric verse with a rhyming pattern, which Arjona says has been rewritten over the years.

“These songs are very, very, very old, over 500 years old,” said Arjona, “and what’s amazing is that we put in verses and they fit perfectly. So we can. change all those songs that I sing today (because) they don’t belong to a songwriter, but to the community, so we can add in and take it out, as long as it rhymes.

Dr Gloria Arjona is leading the Calaveras Literarias event hosted by the Santa Clarita Public Library on Sunday. October 10, 2021. Bobby Block / The signal.

Through the event, Arjona shared with the children the meaning of some of these Calaveras Literarias, using various literary mediums to teach them about the cultures and traditions of Latin America.

It is for this reason that Evette Cabanillas, a resident of Santa Clarita, brought her four children to the center, hoping that they would have the opportunity to learn some of their own cultural heritage.

“I’m Mexican, second generation, and my kids are half Mexican, half white, so I wanted to share more of their heritage with them,” Cabanillas said. “We don’t really speak Spanish at home so we want to start integrating all the culture, and I thought that would be one way to do that. The children are having fun. “

Dr Gloria Arjona is leading the Calaveras Literarias event hosted by the Santa Clarita Public Library on Sunday. October 10, 2021. Bobby Block / The signal.

After Arjona’s presentation, the kids had the chance to do some of their own Mexican-inspired crafts and activities, making Dia de los Muertos decorations before the next vacation.

For more information on upcoming library events, visit SantaClaritaLibrary.com.

Dr Gloria Arjona is leading the Calaveras Literarias event hosted by the Santa Clarita Public Library on Sunday. October 10, 2021. Bobby Block / The signal.


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/children-of-scv-discover-calaveras-literarias-thanks-to-hispanic-heritage-month/feed/ 0
Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month: Latin Women in Science | John Lindsey | John lindsey https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrating-hispanic-heritage-month-latin-women-in-science-john-lindsey-john-lindsey/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrating-hispanic-heritage-month-latin-women-in-science-john-lindsey-john-lindsey/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrating-hispanic-heritage-month-latin-women-in-science-john-lindsey-john-lindsey/ I want to recognize the achievements and contributions of Hispanic Americans. This is the story of two Latino marine biologists who are making a difference in our understanding of our local and global marine ecosystems. They have also become role models for others in their field. Let’s start by telling the story of the growing […]]]>

I want to recognize the achievements and contributions of Hispanic Americans. This is the story of two Latino marine biologists who are making a difference in our understanding of our local and global marine ecosystems. They have also become role models for others in their field.

Let’s start by telling the story of the growing numbers of great white sharks along the California coast, especially north of Point Conception, drawn to their favorite food choice: seals. The population of elephant seals and sea lions has increased dramatically along the California coast, mainly due to the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, which allowed these pinnipeds to thrive. Not only has shark prey numbers increased, but they have also increased the size of their range, which has expanded north along the coasts of central and northern California due to warmer temperatures. sea ​​water.

Over the years, warm ocean water events have become more common along the California coast. “The blob”, a hot water event that began in 2013, was followed in October 2015 when sea water temperatures hit record highs along the central coast during a very strong event El Niño. A few years later, in 2018, the Scripps Nearshore Waverider buoy hit 81.3 degrees in Southern California Bright, breaking the old record of 80.4 degrees set during the 2015 El Niño event.

In other words, great white sharks seem to benefit from climate change. However, a study in the journal Current Biology published an article declaring that: “One-third of the world’s chondrichthyan fish – sharks, rays and chimaeras – are threatened with extinction, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

To better understand the great white shark population, I decided to ask Melissa Cristina Marquez, nicknamed the “mother of sharks”. She has studied chondrichthyan fish, including great white sharks, for years. She told me that while the numbers of great white sharks are increasing along the California coastline and around the world, sharks, rays and chimaeras are in decline.

“Chondrichthyan fish are exceptionally sensitive to overfishing as they tend to grow slowly and produce few young, compared to other fish. Overfishing has far outstripped efficient resource management for these species,” Marquez said. “They play an important role in our marine ecosystems, transferring nutrients from the high seas to coral reefs. Not only is their extinction leading to an imbalance of the oceans, but it” ruins opportunities for sustainable fishing, tourism and food security. long term”.

During our phone interview, I asked her why she became a marine biologist? Marquez told me that she was inspired by the study of sharks when she first saw a great white shark on Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week”.

In 2011, she entered the undergraduate school of the New College of Florida in Sarasota. During one of her independent study projects at the Bimini Shark Lab in the Bahamas, she found her calling: sharks.

“The following [independent study project] I went to South Africa and studied great white sharks, ”she said. “This led to my graduation thesis, which focused on monitoring great whites; I am always interested in knowing why an animal is where it is and what it does. This is basically my slogan. People will say to me, “What are you, like a public relations shark? And I say, ‘Yeah, I can handle that description.’ “

Since then she has obtained a Masters degree from Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand and is currently pursuing her PhD at Curtin University in Australia.

Marquez is involved in multiple forms of public engagement and is passionate about making the science industry more diverse and inclusive, including making all of its educational content bilingual. His @mcmsharksxx Twitter account has nearly 25,000 followers. She writes monthly articles for Forbes Science; his work has been featured in the Washington Post and many other publications. It was recently announced that Marquez will be named to Fuse Media’s Hispanic Future History class of 2021.

Locally, Gaby Morales was born and raised in Santa Maria. Her parents immigrated to the United States in their twenties and began working in the fields.

“My parents only had a sixth grade education so they didn’t know the potential of what college can bring. Growing up I lived 30 minutes from the beach but never visited Ocean My parents worked Monday through Sunday and never had the chance to take my siblings to many places.

“In high school I had no idea what I wanted to be or what I could even dream of doing until my high school teacher took us on a field trip to the Central Coast Aquarium, and that day- there had an impact on my life because I saw the ocean for the first time in my life.

“During this field trip, we had the opportunity to board a research boat. We were moving forward, and I was so excited, nervous and I felt a lot of emotions; I even said to myself: is am i seasick? over there on that boat we saw a sea otter, and it was cleaning itself, and that’s when i decided i needed to know everything about the ocean. I decided at that point that I wanted to be a marine biologist, “said Morales.

She graduated from UCSB with a degree in Aquatic Biology and returned to the place that made the difference for her childhood: the Central Coast Aquarium. Today, she is the museum’s director of operations.

“I have many tasks, but the most important for me is to be a role model for students like me, minorities and under-represented students,” said Morales.

These women have overcome many adversities to make science more diverse and inclusive, enabling all of us, regardless of race and gender, to reach our full human potential.

John Lindsey is the marine meteorologist for Pacific Gas and Electric Co.’s Diablo Canyon Power Plant and a media relations representative. Email him at pgeweather@pge.com or follow him on Twitter @PGE_John.


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrating-hispanic-heritage-month-latin-women-in-science-john-lindsey-john-lindsey/feed/ 0
New study on Man Ray sheds light on artist’s long-hidden Jewish heritage https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/new-study-on-man-ray-sheds-light-on-artists-long-hidden-jewish-heritage/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/new-study-on-man-ray-sheds-light-on-artists-long-hidden-jewish-heritage/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 09:37:48 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/new-study-on-man-ray-sheds-light-on-artists-long-hidden-jewish-heritage/ Mischievous, self-contradictory, sometimes obscene, Man Ray (1890-1976) refused to be understood. The painter and photographer underestimated much of his own work, such as the poll portraits that paid the bills in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. that of Arthur Lubow Man Ray: The Artist and His Shadows is a graceful and compact look at […]]]>

Mischievous, self-contradictory, sometimes obscene, Man Ray (1890-1976) refused to be understood. The painter and photographer underestimated much of his own work, such as the poll portraits that paid the bills in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s.

that of Arthur Lubow Man Ray: The Artist and His Shadows is a graceful and compact look at man and the many types of art he created, much of which manipulated light. The study is part of Yale University Press’s “Jewish Lives” series – self-appointed Man Ray barely admitted he was Jewish.

Shadow is a key word here. Man Ray pioneered cameraless photography in images called rayographies and solarizations, from the shadows of objects on paper. These dreamlike shapes gave everyday objects a staged grandeur. He took photographs in the shadow of painting, his avowed vocation, while his first paintings were in the shadow of Marcel Duchamp. He has also relegated his origins, his Jewishness, to the shadows.

Man Ray was born Emmanuel Radnitsky in Philadelphia in 1890 to Jewish parents, a tailor and a seamstress, who emigrated from Russia. Determined to be a painter, he also turned to photography and photographers exploring this still young medium.

Marcel Duchamp, the Cubist and Dadaist Man Ray met during an artists retreat in New Jersey, was his lead to Paris, where Man Ray found a home and a shared conceptual language. Later, the strict rule maker of Surrealism, André Breton, called Man Ray a “pre-surrealist”.

Lubow names five chapters in his short study for the companions of Man Ray. The artist regularly offers accommodation to young women who need it. Many have become her lovers, such as Kiki de Montparnasse (née Alice Prin), the cheeky artist and model in so many of her photographs. Their bond was as crazy as any wacky comedy. Man Ray’s images of her, such as The Violin d’Ingres (1924), where he superimposes f-holes as if his body were a musical instrument – resounding with innuendo – are images that define this era. The sex in his work and the subject of who was which muse will occupy scholars.

Man Ray separated from another lover, the Guadeloupean dancer Adeline Fidelin, when he recognized his Jewishness enough to flee the invasion of France by Nazi Germany. He ended up in Los Angeles, where he found a new wife and few fans, and worked on repainting paintings he had left behind. After the war, New York was the capital of art. The abstract expressionism of Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko never spoke to the spiritual and conceptual Man Ray, back in Paris. There, while Duchamp gave up making art, Man Ray buried himself in his studio, stuck in an idea of ​​Paris that was no longer.

Lubow’s evocation of Man Ray is full of intuitions, often dramatic, and is sincere about the artist’s friendship with Duchamp, but it does not innovate. The few images are far from the massive production of Man Ray. In addition, the Jewishness of Man Ray has been examined in AKA Man Ray, a rigorous exhibition and catalog from the Jewish Museum, New York, in 2009-10. So far, Man Ray still frustrates those who want to bring him out of the shadows. They will keep trying.

• Arthur Lubow, Man Ray: The Artist and His Shadows, Yale, 216pp, 30 colors + 1 ill. b / w, £ 16.99 (hb), pub. September 14, 2021 (United States), November 9, 2021 (United Kingdom)


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/new-study-on-man-ray-sheds-light-on-artists-long-hidden-jewish-heritage/feed/ 0
Community members work to preserve Hispanic heritage in Fort Collins https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/community-members-work-to-preserve-hispanic-heritage-in-fort-collins/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/community-members-work-to-preserve-hispanic-heritage-in-fort-collins/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 05:37:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/community-members-work-to-preserve-hispanic-heritage-in-fort-collins/ FORT COLLINS, Colorado – Whether you can see it or not, the Hispanic heritage is ingrained in Fort Collins. “So many people don’t even know the history of Fort Collins when it comes to Hispanics. A lot of people say, ‘Well, where are they,’ said Betty Aragon-Mitotes with Mujeres de Colores. Hispanics make up just […]]]>

FORT COLLINS, Colorado – Whether you can see it or not, the Hispanic heritage is ingrained in Fort Collins.

“So many people don’t even know the history of Fort Collins when it comes to Hispanics. A lot of people say, ‘Well, where are they,’ said Betty Aragon-Mitotes with Mujeres de Colores.

Hispanics make up just over 10% of Fort Collins’ population, but their history dates back decades. For many, it started in a sugar beet field in the 1930s, now called Sugar Beet Park.

“They worked a lot, from sun to sunset. It was grueling work,” said Aragon-Mitotes.

For Aragon-Mitotes, this is a work that is largely unknown.

“It’s forgotten. It’s not there. It’s under the rug. I don’t want it to be under the rug anymore,” said Aragon-Mitotes.

So she and a local artist set to work to shed light on this history and culture. With the help of the community, enough money was raised to create an imposing bronze sculpture to be placed in Sugar Beet Park.

“To me it actually symbolizes some sort of daily grind, like you can imagine someone who’s been in … Garza said.

The sculpture depicts a hand firmly holding a short-handled hoe – an agricultural tool that has since been banned – which has caused years of pain to those who have used it.

“It was part of the Hispanic story that we want to shed light on,” Aragon-Mitotes said.

But even then, this sculpture is just a step toward telling the story of Hispanic culture, heritage, and art in Fort Collins.

“We have to fight constantly, you know, to make sure that whatever has an impact on the Hispanic community, that we’re at the table and that’s not always the case,” said Aragon-Mitotes.

It’s a fight that erupted years ago and shows no signs of slowing down.


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/community-members-work-to-preserve-hispanic-heritage-in-fort-collins/feed/ 0
Dow Swimming wins over Heritage https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/dow-swimming-wins-over-heritage/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/dow-swimming-wins-over-heritage/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:03:53 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/dow-swimming-wins-over-heritage/ Dow High topped Saginaw Heritage 142-41 in the Saginaw Valley League women’s swim on Tuesday to improve to 2-4 overall. Ella Roberson advanced to the state finals in the 200 medley and 100 backstroke for the Chargers, who are ranked ninth in Division 2. Next up for Dow is the MISCA demo meet at Calvin […]]]>

Dow High topped Saginaw Heritage 142-41 in the Saginaw Valley League women’s swim on Tuesday to improve to 2-4 overall. Ella Roberson advanced to the state finals in the 200 medley and 100 backstroke for the Chargers, who are ranked ninth in Division 2.

Next up for Dow is the MISCA demo meet at Calvin University this weekend, with qualified divers competing on Friday at 6 p.m. and qualified swimmers entering the pool on Saturday at noon.

Here are the Chargers’ top three in each event in Tuesday’s game:

200 YARDS MEDLEY RELAY – 1. Dow (Ella Roberson, Mia Behm, Naomi Coyer, Sophia Sower) 2: 07.05; 3. Dow (Lindsay Humburg, Lauren Burgard, Emily Thackery, Natalie Nussear) 2: 09.47


200 FREESTYLE – 1. Chloe Stafford 2: 05.21; 2. Emmy Semeur 2: 05.38; 3. Alea Casipit 2: 10.22

200 INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY – 1. Roberson 2: 07/14; 3. Thackery 2: 28.51

50 FREESTYLE – 1. Eryn Murphy 27.03; 2. Burgard 28.41; 3. Catherine Gray 29.48


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/dow-swimming-wins-over-heritage/feed/ 0
Preserving the taste of the High Country at Crossnore Heritage Orchard | Avery https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/preserving-the-taste-of-the-high-country-at-crossnore-heritage-orchard-avery/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/preserving-the-taste-of-the-high-country-at-crossnore-heritage-orchard-avery/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/preserving-the-taste-of-the-high-country-at-crossnore-heritage-orchard-avery/ CROSSNORE – Apple season is in full swing in Avery County. Apple tree owners and orchards harvest early fall apples in the High Country, where the apples grow spectacularly. One of those orchards bearing substantial fruit is the Crossnore Heritage Orchard. Launched in 2009, Crossnore Orchard contains around 22 different varieties of apples on around […]]]>

CROSSNORE – Apple season is in full swing in Avery County.

Apple tree owners and orchards harvest early fall apples in the High Country, where the apples grow spectacularly. One of those orchards bearing substantial fruit is the Crossnore Heritage Orchard.

Launched in 2009, Crossnore Orchard contains around 22 different varieties of apples on around 38 different trees. The public orchard is owned by Crossnore Communities for Children and is used by the Avery Cooperative Extension for environmental education and agricultural demonstrations. The orchard is also a living embodiment of Avery’s agricultural history which helps to remember what has helped support the people of the area for years. Some of the trees in the orchard have nameplates with informational and historical messages to describe the variety.

The apple varieties in this orchard consist of many types that are not usually found in a general store. Strains such as American Golden Russet, also known as Rusty Coat, Virginia Beauty, and Newtown Pippin ripen around this time. They are a tasty way to get a taste of historic High Country culture.

Thanks to the interest of local citizens, these heritage varieties have been identified and grafted to create a culture that preserves history, educates and satisfies the community.

This season has been particularly strong to bear fruit for the Crossnore Heritage Orchard. Bill Hoffman, agricultural extension officer, said this year has provided “an incredible harvest of apples.” He noted that there were “good conditions, less frost and just the right time for them to endure.”

One of the perks of Crossnore’s location is that it’s a bit too residential for large expanses of deer to roam, which Hoffman refers to as one of the crop’s biggest pests. The site offers good soil, good sun disposition and air circulation which contributes to proper growth.

Apples, a versatile fruit, can be more than just eaten on the branch. Applesauce and cider are delicious ways to ingest the vitamins inherent in the fruit. Most of the apple varieties found in the orchard are ideal for both uses. Apple cider, a popular fall drink, can be made easily using a cider press.

The Avery Extension Service has a press that can be hired by the day for personal use. The press crushes the apples into a pulp, then an attached crank is used to squeeze all the sweet nectar from the fruit. When finished, the cider comes out ready to drink.

Cider is a nuanced drink and can be made from any type of apple. Some, like the Grimes Golden, are better suited than others. However, mixing different varieties in one cider is a great way to personalize the drink. The different ripeness of apples can also alter the flavor, bringing a bit of mystery to the mixture. Hoffman explained that cider freezes extremely well, so it can be stored for an extended period of time and enjoyed later.


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/preserving-the-taste-of-the-high-country-at-crossnore-heritage-orchard-avery/feed/ 0
Hispanic heritage receives meme treatment: “Mordida, Mordida” https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/hispanic-heritage-receives-meme-treatment-mordida-mordida/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/hispanic-heritage-receives-meme-treatment-mordida-mordida/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 13:39:38 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/hispanic-heritage-receives-meme-treatment-mordida-mordida/ “His neck would start to hurt from being in this position for a while,” he said. Not all memes were created for Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs September 15 through October 15. The radio caller who mistook “Rythm of the Night” for Reeboks or Nikes has already gone viral. (Sally Moon, 27, said on Twitter […]]]>

“His neck would start to hurt from being in this position for a while,” he said.

Not all memes were created for Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs September 15 through October 15. The radio caller who mistook “Rythm of the Night” for Reeboks or Nikes has already gone viral. (Sally Moon, 27, said on Twitter that the clip had been “permanently tagged” in their brains for over 10 years.) But in a world dominated by Twitter, Instagram, TikTok, and Facebook, where it all ends online, memes took on new meaning during Hispanic Heritage Month.

“For me, it means a time to appreciate where we’ve all come from,” Mr. Sanchez said. “It’s also a time when we all realize and relate to each other. That even though we come from different places or countries, we all have similar customs and the same idiosyncrasies.

Hispanic Heritage Month began as a week-long celebration after President Lyndon Johnson enacted the National Hispanic Heritage Week bill in 1968. Twenty years later President Ronald Reagan signed into law which extended the celebration to a full month.

“Hispanic Heritage Month also gives other ethnicities the opportunity to see that we are not very different from each other and to appreciate the rich cultural diversity that we bring to the table,” Sanchez said. , who was born in Nicaragua and now lives in Virginia.

Companies like Target, T-Mobile, and the NFL are taking their own steps to recognize the month. Target has partnered with Hispanic designers and entrepreneurs to create a limited-time collection of shirts, coffee mugs and other accessories. T-Mobile, in conjunction with iHeartMedia, has pledged to donate over $ 100,000 to the Hispanic Heritage Foundation. And the NFL put a tilde over the N in its logo, among other efforts.

While the company’s actions and initiatives take steps to recognize the month and the people who support it, tweets are a way of honoring your legacy with a laugh.

Yet some believe that a month is not enough to recognize a group that represents millions in the United States.



Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/hispanic-heritage-receives-meme-treatment-mordida-mordida/feed/ 0
Pokémon TCG base set box breakage happens at Heritage auction https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pokemon-tcg-base-set-box-breakage-happens-at-heritage-auction/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pokemon-tcg-base-set-box-breakage-happens-at-heritage-auction/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 19:27:13 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pokemon-tcg-base-set-box-breakage-happens-at-heritage-auction/ | Heritage Auctions, a Dallas, Texas-based auction house known to handle auctions primarily focused on comics, video games, trading cards, and other collectibles, is now holding a very special auction series: they have a Basic box break Set unlimited boosters from the Pokémon Trading Card Game! Box breaks, for those not yet in the know, […]]]>

|

Heritage Auctions, a Dallas, Texas-based auction house known to handle auctions primarily focused on comics, video games, trading cards, and other collectibles, is now holding a very special auction series: they have a Basic box break Set unlimited boosters from the Pokémon Trading Card Game! Box breaks, for those not yet in the know, is where bidders bid on individual packs from a sealed recall box of a deck of cards and then the auctioneer unseals them. packs and gives bidders what they’re bidding on, sometimes with the freedom to open packs live or otherwise. Potential bidders for this Pokémon TCG box breaks have until Monday, October 4 to bid on one of the Base Set Unlimited booster box packs.

Heritage Auctions.” src=”data:image/svg+xml,%3Csvg%20viewBox%3D%220%200%20600%201003%22%20width%3D%22600%22%20height%3D%221003%22%20xmlns%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww.w3.org%2F2000%2Fsvg%22%3E%3C%2Fsvg%3E” alt=”An example of one of the possible boosters available in this box break. The Pokémon TCG Base Set Unlimited booster box is sealed, so please note that this style of pack is not guaranteed. Currently run by Heritage Auctions.” width=”600″ height=”1003″/>
An example of one of the possible boosters available in this box break. The Pokémon TCG The Base Set Unlimited booster box is sealed, so please note that this style of pack is not guaranteed. Currently run by Heritage Auctions.

Box breakages have been a big problem over the past couple of years, when the price of Pokémon TCG spiked cards due to what we can call the “Logan paul effect “. The market for Pokemon cards has never been higher than it is today, even considering the absolute “Poké-mania” that swept the nation in the late 1990s. This booster box is likely to contain more than a dozen holographic cards, all in a suspected Gem Mint condition, which means that if you win any of those 36 chances to open a pack, you could have a serious opportunity to open an extremely valuable card. This includes the legendary Charizard map from the base set, so this is a box-breaking opportunity that you probably won’t want to miss.

If you want to bid on a pack in this Pokémon TCG Base Set Unlimited box break, please keep in mind that you have until Monday, October 4 to place a bid on one or more of these packs. You can find the box auction listings on the Heritage Auctions website by clicking here. Good luck!

Posted in: Card games, Games, Heritage Sponsored, Pokémon TCG, Tabletop, Wizards of the Coast | Tagged: Base Set, booster, box break, Charizard, pokemon, TCG

Did you like it? Thanks for sharing on social media!



Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pokemon-tcg-base-set-box-breakage-happens-at-heritage-auction/feed/ 0
Fall Festival Gathers Hundreds of People at Andresen Center, Heritage Canyon | Local News https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/fall-festival-gathers-hundreds-of-people-at-andresen-center-heritage-canyon-local-news/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/fall-festival-gathers-hundreds-of-people-at-andresen-center-heritage-canyon-local-news/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 18:54:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/fall-festival-gathers-hundreds-of-people-at-andresen-center-heritage-canyon-local-news/ FULTON, Ill. – Andresen Nature Center and Heritage Canyon welcomed hundreds of visitors this weekend during the Fulton Fall Festival. Andresen was busy on Saturday, manager Kyle Kopf said, although turnout was slow on Sunday morning. High school students earned volunteer hours working at the Center on Saturday, Kopf said, and 23 visitors brought packets […]]]>

FULTON, Ill. – Andresen Nature Center and Heritage Canyon welcomed hundreds of visitors this weekend during the Fulton Fall Festival.

Andresen was busy on Saturday, manager Kyle Kopf said, although turnout was slow on Sunday morning.

High school students earned volunteer hours working at the Center on Saturday, Kopf said, and 23 visitors brought packets of seeds home.

A meadow of native plants grows next to the Andresen Center. The Center distributes seeds to people who want to create their own meadow. Unlike most seeds people plant, grassland plants take two to three years to establish, Kopf said.

Educating people who want to plant grasslands is important, Kopf said. The Andresen Center meadow was planted between three and seven years ago.

Nearly 500 visitors visited Heritage Canyon on Saturday, volunteer Carol Fritz said on Sunday. “We had an absolutely fabulous day yesterday.”

Visitors were in awe of America’s early artisans who dress according to the era and perform tasks like they did in the early 19th century, she said.

Saturday visitors missed the petting zoo. Paula Adams and Chris McCauley of P&C Little Rascals, LLC of Chadwick hauled a trailer full of animals to Heritage Canyon on Sunday.

“We do a lot of children’s zoos around [Illinois]Adams said. Hooligan the alpaca, Larry the llama, Annabelle the miniature cow, sheep and chickens were among the animals ready to welcome visitors.

Aaliyah Sikkema and Mia Meiners from Fulton cycled to Heritage Canyon. Meiners also visited the Canyon on Saturday, she said while petting sheep. “It’s like a family tradition.

Meiners said his favorite part of the Canyon is the ice cream shop.

John Mallow of Bellevue became a fur trader over the weekend in Fulton. His camp and clothing was a picture of the fur trade from 1825 to 1840, he said.

Lucille Paul and Cami Bengtson of Clinton occupied the summer kitchen on Sunday. “I’ve been doing this since I was 9,” said Paul.

Paul typically volunteers alongside his grandmother, Liz Keller, chair of the board of the Early American Crafters. It was Paul’s first year alone in the kitchen, but she brought a friend to help her.


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/fall-festival-gathers-hundreds-of-people-at-andresen-center-heritage-canyon-local-news/feed/ 0
Celebrate your Italian heritage with “Thirty-one Days of Italians” https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrate-your-italian-heritage-with-thirty-one-days-of-italians/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrate-your-italian-heritage-with-thirty-one-days-of-italians/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 01:03:55 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrate-your-italian-heritage-with-thirty-one-days-of-italians/ Each year since 2007, “Thirty-one Days of Italians” has provided a list of accomplished Italians and Italians to be honored for each day of October, Italian-American Heritage Month. On the website, thirtyonedaysofitalians.com, more than 70 extraordinary people of Italian descent are recognized for their significant contributions to America, with a condensed biography and links to […]]]>

Each year since 2007, “Thirty-one Days of Italians” has provided a list of accomplished Italians and Italians to be honored for each day of October, Italian-American Heritage Month. On the website, thirtyonedaysofitalians.com, more than 70 extraordinary people of Italian descent are recognized for their significant contributions to America, with a condensed biography and links to selected resources provided for each person.

Fifteen are honorary members, on the list each year. Undeniably, each person on the list is remarkable, but the contributions of Honorary Members are deeply rooted in America’s growth and culture: from becoming our country’s namesake to forming the basis of the States’ Declaration of Independence. -United ; from the revolution of the banking system to the advancement of technologies in science and communications; for their sincere compassion in helping immigrants; to be part of American society in art, architecture, education, recreation and music; and – of course – for the man who connected uncharted land to Europe.

In alphabetical order, they are Father Pietro Bandini, Constantino Brumidi, Mother Francis Cabrini, Enrico Caruso, Christophe Colomb, Enrico Fermi, Amadeo Pietro Giannini, Guglielmo Marconi, Filippo Mazzei, Antonio Meucci, Maria Montessori, Andrea Palladio, Antonio Pasin , Arturo Toscanini, and Amerigo Vespucci.

The greatest honor, however, goes to Italian immigrants. Our ancestors who had the courage to leave their beautiful country and travel to a land that not only offered them hope, but also allowed them to pass on the legacy of opportunity to their descendants. The first day of October is reserved in their honor, because without their trips to America, where would we be?

The last day of October has many connotations, so it’s an appropriate day to honor anyone of Italian descent. Maybe a family member or a whole family, a friend or friends, or your personal superstar.

With only 14 days remaining, other Italian heritage notables are rotated each year, giving everyone on “Thirty-one Days of Italians” a chance to have their day – even if only once every. every four to five years. This year’s list includes a hero from the War of Independence; a Jesuit missionary who could soon be canonized a saint; a former soldier who partnered with La Salle to explore the Mississippi River and claim Louisiana territory for King Louis XIV; and a cowboy who has become an undercover Pinkerton detective crossing paths with Billy the Kid, Butch Cassidy, Wyatt Earp and many other legendary figures of the Old West.

The list also includes mid-20th century pioneers who made an impact in medical research, fashion photography, rink coating, hang gliding, frozen food, and many other industries. The 2021-22 list includes (in alphabetical order) John Buscema, Eusebio Francesco Chini (Kino), Fred De Luca, Enrico de Tonti (Henri), Robert Charles Gallo, Jeno F. Paulucci, Leonard Riggio, Francis Rogallo, RA Salvatore, Giorgio Santelli, Francisco Scavullo, Charles Angelo Siringo, Giuseppe Maria Francesco Vigo and Frank Zamboni.

Spend time with these Italian-American icons. Read their biographies, check out the resources provided, and immerse yourself in their lives for an hour or two. Then share your knowledge with others. Education is the key to the preservation of Italian-American history, heritage and culture.

Check out the full name schedule and learn more about them on the Italians’ thirty-one day 2021-22 roster.


Source link

]]>
https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrate-your-italian-heritage-with-thirty-one-days-of-italians/feed/ 0