Historical Organizations – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 01:31:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Historical Organizations – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Activists recount ‘red fear’ trauma and new concerns https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/activists-recount-red-fear-trauma-and-new-concerns/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/activists-recount-red-fear-trauma-and-new-concerns/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 01:31:35 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/activists-recount-red-fear-trauma-and-new-concerns/ There was a fear of speaking to strangers, harassment from the FBI, public exposure and shame by the local media. William Dere, an activist from the San Francisco Bay Area, recalled how his family and many other Chinese Americans suffered from “red fear” in the 1950s. “The FBI would ring on doors, talk to children […]]]>

There was a fear of speaking to strangers, harassment from the FBI, public exposure and shame by the local media.

William Dere, an activist from the San Francisco Bay Area, recalled how his family and many other Chinese Americans suffered from “red fear” in the 1950s.

“The FBI would ring on doors, talk to children in the playground, tell lies to intimidate Chinese Americans into obtaining information that would expose a person as a ‘son of paper.’ The targeted person may then be charged with immigration violations, ”Dere told a recent webinar hosted by the Chinese Historical Society of America.

The main vehicle for the government to attack the left and progressives at the time was to investigate Chinese use of false papers to immigrate to the United States, William Dere’s sister Jean Dere wrote. also an activist, in an article published by the Journal of the Chinese Historical Society of America.

Their father, Kai Dere, was a member of the Chinese American Democratic Youth League, a progressive group in San Francisco. Because its members showed support for the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, the group was part of several Chinese community organizations targeted by the FBI during the Cold War and the McCarthy era, according to the article. .

The government also created a “confession program” in 1956, pressuring the Chinese community to “confess” to immigration in exchange for immunity.

“An atmosphere of fear enveloped Chinatown. One person’s confession inevitably incriminated many others,” writes Jean Dere in the article.

As a result of the program, her father was tried in court, his citizenship was eventually revoked and threatened with deportation.

“There was a lot of fear and anxiety within our family. We were told not to talk to strangers, especially white males, not to answer any questions when the FBI came to our door. There were arguments and estrangements between the parents, “said Guillaume Dere. “There were relatives we had not seen for years because of resentment and feelings of betrayal as a result of the persecution by the US government.

Her father was not deported because there was no diplomatic relations between the United States and China at the time. “My father became stateless without a passport, without the ability to leave and return to the United States. He was never even able to gain permanent resident status,” Dere said.

Besides the emotional and psychological toll, her family also suffered the economic impact due to legal fees to fight the charges and maintain her residence in the United States.

“They (the government) got rid of their propaganda and tried to change people’s opinions. Although they have done this several times for the ‘Red Fear’, we should learn that it is about a tactic and a strategy, ”Dere said. “I think it’s really important that we learn from history and don’t repeat mistakes.”

“Unfortunately, the US government has learned nothing from history,” said Lillian Sing, a founding member of many human rights and women’s rights organizations in San Francisco.

“It is so sad that our government is repeating what it did to Japanese Americans in WWII, and what it did in the 1950s to Chinese Americans and other activists in the McCarthy era, ”she said, referring to the“ China Initiative, ”a program launched by Donald Trump’s administration to fight economic espionage.

After three years of a thorough FBI investigation, none of the cases initiated under the initiative involved espionage-related charges, Sing said.

A 2009 study found that the majority of those accused of espionage began to switch from individuals with Western names to those with Chinese names.

Andrew Chongseh Kim, lawyer at the law firm Greenberg Traurig, and the Committee of 100 co-authored the report “Racial Disparities in Economic Espionage Act Prosecutions: A Window into the New Red Scare”.

Their research analyzed data from 1996 to 2020 involving 276 individual defendants in 190 cases brought under the Economic Espionage Act.

“Most of the defendants with Western names received a subpoena ordering them to appear in court, while 78% of the defendants with Chinese names were arrested with handcuffs,” Kim said. “Being arrested is a truly traumatic experience.”

Xiaoxing Xi, a physics professor at Temple University in Philadelphia, was handcuffed and taken out of his home in front of his wife and two young daughters; Sherry Chen, an employee of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Ohio, was handcuffed and left her office, friends and co-workers, and taken to a federal detention center, Kim said.

For those with Chinese names, the US Department of Justice issues press releases for 80% of cases. By issuing the statements and naming an initiative after a specific country, the government “makes it easier for Americans to imagine that people who look Chinese are Chinese spies,” Kim said.


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Tri Cities Civil War Roundtable Welcomes Gordon Rhea | Sunday Stories https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/tri-cities-civil-war-roundtable-welcomes-gordon-rhea-sunday-stories/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/tri-cities-civil-war-roundtable-welcomes-gordon-rhea-sunday-stories/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/tri-cities-civil-war-roundtable-welcomes-gordon-rhea-sunday-stories/ The Tri Cities Civil War Roundtable will welcome nationally renowned historian Gordon Rhea to Kingsport on Monday for its monthly program. Rhea will present “JEB Stuart at the Battle of the Yellow Tavern” at the Renaissance Center Little Theater. The program starts at 7 p.m. Entrance is free and open to the public. The use […]]]>

The Tri Cities Civil War Roundtable will welcome nationally renowned historian Gordon Rhea to Kingsport on Monday for its monthly program.

Rhea will present “JEB Stuart at the Battle of the Yellow Tavern” at the Renaissance Center Little Theater. The program starts at 7 p.m. Entrance is free and open to the public. The use of face masks is optional.

Rhea will discuss Stuart, the person, his life, his performance as a cavalry commander, his fatal wounds in the Battle of Yellow Tavern and his “Bold Dragoon” culture. He will also delve into the controversial question of whether his replacement, Wade Hampton, was more suited to the changing nature of war.

After Stuart’s death, Flora Stuart honored her husband’s request to raise their children in the South, and for a short time after the war she lived in the nearby town of Saltville, Va., With the brother of JEB Stuart, William Alexander Stuart, and his family. The log cabin where they resided is still standing. She also opened a school in Saltville. In 1878, she moved to Staunton where she taught at a Methodist school. In 1880, she became director of the Virginia Female Institute in Staunton, an episcopal school for girls created in 1844.

Rhea has lectured extensively on military history topics at United States Army Training and Doctrine Command, and as a speaker at several National Military Parks, Historical Societies and Civil War Roundtables across the country. He has served on numerous boards of historical societies, magazines, and historic preservation organizations, including the Philadelphia Civil War Library and Museum and North and South Magazine. He has appeared in programs related to American history on the History Channel, A&E and Discovery Channel. He has published extensively and published a book in November titled “Stephen A. Swails: Black Freedom Fighter in the Civil War and Reconstruction”.

Rhea’s earlier work on the Virginia Overland campaigns of 1864 established him as the most knowledgeable scholar of the period. He has a remarkable skill at explaining the intricate maneuvers and events of those confusing weeks, and he is adept at creating engaging narratives as well.

TCCWRT members are invited to dine with the presenter Monday at 5 p.m. at The Chop House in Kingsport. However, reservations are required. Email Wayne Strong at trustwrks@aol.com or call 423-323-2306 to reserve a seat for dinner.

Anyone with Civil War books or magazines to give away for the November 8 sale should bring them to the October meeting. The guest speaker for November will be Kennesaw University professor Brian Wills, who will introduce “Major General George H. Thomas, The Rock of Chickamauga”.


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Colonial Williamsburg and W&M renew their partnership with the Omohundro Institute https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/colonial-williamsburg-and-wm-renew-their-partnership-with-the-omohundro-institute/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/colonial-williamsburg-and-wm-renew-their-partnership-with-the-omohundro-institute/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 13:44:56 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/colonial-williamsburg-and-wm-renew-their-partnership-with-the-omohundro-institute/ by the staff | October 8, 2021 Colonial Williamsburg has renewed its commitment to independent academic research by joining William & Mary in financially supporting the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture. The Omohundro Institute (OI) was established by the two institutions in 1943 and has become the country’s leading academic center for […]]]>


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A Leif festival for fall | News, Sports, Jobs https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-leif-festival-for-fall-news-sports-jobs/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-leif-festival-for-fall-news-sports-jobs/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 06:01:52 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-leif-festival-for-fall-news-sports-jobs/ The organizers of the LEIF ERIKSON FALL FESTIVAL – left to right, Carol Sundstrom, John Sundstrom and Nancy Sundstrom – decorate the park in Norway for the annual event this weekend. Activities start at 10 a.m. on Saturday in downtown Norway. (Photo by Terri Castelaz / Daily News) NORWAY – The city of Norway will […]]]>

The organizers of the LEIF ERIKSON FALL FESTIVAL – left to right, Carol Sundstrom, John Sundstrom and Nancy Sundstrom – decorate the park in Norway for the annual event this weekend. Activities start at 10 a.m. on Saturday in downtown Norway. (Photo by Terri Castelaz / Daily News)

NORWAY – The city of Norway will celebrate Leif Erikson this weekend with its annual Fall Festival.

October 9 is a day dedicated to the honor of the Nordic explorer who would be the first European to reach North America.

The majority of the festivities will take place outside, as there are always safety concerns in the event of a pandemic, organizer Nancy Sundstrom said.

The extended weather forecast predicts fine fall weather – perfect for the event, she added.

The celebration kicks off at 10 a.m. on Main Street in downtown Norway on Saturday.

Viking reenactments will once again have a camp set up in front of the town’s bandshell to share their history and provide a glimpse into the past.

Everyone is encouraged to walk around the camp, asking questions and taking pictures.

At 11 a.m., Viking reenactors will present a combat demonstration at the bandstand.

The Day Dreamers will perform from noon to 1:30 p.m. in the grandstand. “They performed at Out To Lunch and Music in the Park this year and are fan favorites,” Sundstrom said. “They are really good. “

They play a variety of covers and an occasional original, she added.

The city of Norway will announce its Public Safety Week award winners at 1:30 pm This will only be open to city residents who have registered to participate.

The coronation of Miss Norway and the Nordic King will follow at 1:45 p.m.

The Leif Erikson parade starts at 2 p.m. on Main Street and Fourth Avenue, near St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

Children will be able to make their own viking costume, as well as a costume for their pets on a leash, from 10 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. at the children’s kiosk.

Each child in the parade who has a costume will receive a prize. “It’s gonna be something they’ll like,” Sundstrom said.

Prizes will also be awarded to adults and organizations registrations. “The prizes will consist of Viking bucks, which are redeemable at any Norwegian business”, Sundstrom said. All the prizes will be presented in the grandstand after the parade.

A “The taste of Norway” will feature several restaurants and local organizations offering a variety of foods until 4 p.m. next to the bandstand.

Cart rides can be taken until 2:00 p.m. on Main Street.

Other highlights include the sale of crafts and vendors at the American Legion, 621 Main St .; and blacksmithing demonstrations and a farmers market, both in the Veterans Park area on Main Street.

“This is the perfect opportunity to get pumpkins and fall produce”, Sundstrom said.

The event will also include pony rides and a petting zoo for the kids to enjoy.

New this year will be a visit to the hydraulic dam in the city of Norway. Bus services will be provided from Main Street and Railroad Avenue near the Knight Owl. The first bus will leave at 2:30 p.m., the last bus at 5:00 p.m. Tours and bus trips are free.

“They will also provide free children to those who participate in the tour”, she said.

Those interested in the tours are advised to take the buses, as parking is very limited.

The dedication of Jake’s Cabin will take place at 10 a.m. at the Jake Menghini Historical Museum, 105 Odill Drive in Norway. After the dedication, all museum buildings can be visited until noon. Everyone is requested to wear a mask to enter. Admission is $ 5 for adults and free for students up to high school.

Viking Day will conclude with a torchlight parade at 8 p.m. around Strawberry Lake to the Viking burial and reenactment of the funeral pyre. Participants are to meet at the Knights Kingdom Playground.

Adults must bring a flashlight to navigate the lake path, and children will receive a free glow stick while supplies last.

“It’s fun for the whole family” Sundstrom said.

On Sunday, the community can enjoy a “Breakfast fit for a Viking” 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Mike’s On Main.

The Leif Run takes place Sunday at 10 a.m., and will feature competitive 5K and 10K races as well as a fun 3K run / walk. The race starts at Marion Park on US 8. Registration is required for the 5K and 10K races, but not for the 2 mile fun race. The forms are available on leiferiksonfest.com.

Many Norwegian companies will also be offering music, events and specials.

Donations from the Curtis J. Brackett Memorial Fund and the Norwegian Downtown Development Association help make the festival possible.

“After canceling last year, we are just happy to be able to organize the event”, Sundstrom said. “Next year we plan to be bigger and better. “

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The Buffalo History Museum will receive $ 144,500 in ARP funding https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-buffalo-history-museum-will-receive-144500-in-arp-funding/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-buffalo-history-museum-will-receive-144500-in-arp-funding/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 16:17:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-buffalo-history-museum-will-receive-144500-in-arp-funding/ BUFFALO, NY – The Buffalo History Museum receives more than $ 144,000 thanks to the US bailout. The money will help protect jobs and support the museum’s programs. “I have had the opportunity to visit the Buffalo History Museum twice in the past two months and each visit offers a new appreciation for the historical […]]]>

BUFFALO, NY – The Buffalo History Museum receives more than $ 144,000 thanks to the US bailout.

The money will help protect jobs and support the museum’s programs.

“I have had the opportunity to visit the Buffalo History Museum twice in the past two months and each visit offers a new appreciation for the historical museum itself as well as the engaging nature of its various collections,” said the Congressman Higgins. “Cultural institutions play a vital role in the economy and quality of life in West New York. This federal funding helps people keep working and maintains public access to all of the history museum’s offerings. “

The Buffalo History Museum is one of several historic organizations nationwide to raise money for the federal government.

“In light of COVID-19, the community now has extensive options to access and learn about the history of our region through the museum’s online programs, virtual tours, a series of podcasts, and more” , said Melissa Brown, executive director of the Buffalo History Museum. . “With the continued support of this US bailout funding, the museum can ensure that staff are able to not only maintain, but also build on these innovative new services for our community.”

The American Rescue Plan allocated $ 135 million to cultural organizations and educational institutions.


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City cleans up environmental contamination from historic train stations https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/city-cleans-up-environmental-contamination-from-historic-train-stations/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/city-cleans-up-environmental-contamination-from-historic-train-stations/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 22:45:38 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/city-cleans-up-environmental-contamination-from-historic-train-stations/ October 4, 2021 at 4:45 p.m. On Saturday, Mayor Tim Keller and a group of city leaders provided an update on the historic cleanup of train stations from environmental contamination on the property. Due to the historical uses of the site, the marshalling yards have suffered environmental impacts due to both petroleum hydrocarbon and metal […]]]>


On Saturday, Mayor Tim Keller and a group of city leaders provided an update on the historic cleanup of train stations from environmental contamination on the property. Due to the historical uses of the site, the marshalling yards have suffered environmental impacts due to both petroleum hydrocarbon and metal contamination. The city has received a certificate of conditional completion for environmental remediation on the northern half of the property, as outlined in the state Department of Environment’s voluntary remediation program.

The city has removed hundreds of windows containing asbestos and lead contaminated soil and has met critical remediation requirements to keep the property healthy for the environment and visitors. The conditional certificate also requires ongoing monitoring of hazardous materials on the property through groundwater sampling and soil sampling.

“We bought the train stations with the goal of redeveloping this historic site and creating a space that the whole community can enjoy,” Keller said. “This site is a historic piece of Albuquerque and we are pleased to make significant progress in revitalizing the yards.”

“Much of the work being done here has left behind hazardous materials like lead and asbestos,” said Acting Department of Environmental Health Director Mark DiMenna. “Thanks to our remediation work, we can now use the space safely and continue to monitor to ensure public and environmental health.”

“The Environmental Department will continue to work closely and in conjunction with the City’s Environmental Health Department to certify the remainder of the Rail Yards property,” said Water Protection Division Manager John Rhoderick.

The city began a streetscape project on Monday that will add a wide pedestrian path with green spaces and benches. The project will also add traffic calming devices on Second Street to make the area safer for pedestrians and cyclists. In addition to the work on the footpath, a new entrance will be added for pedestrians and bicycles on the north side of the Rail Yard property.

“Creating a safe and walkable space along the Rail Yards property will make the space more inviting and easier to access while ensuring it blends in with the surrounding neighborhoods,” Lawrence said. Rael, city operations manager. “There is a lot of work to be done here and we can’t wait to see more and more people using the yards. “

Currently, train stations are not available for private rentals, such as weddings, due to a large film production using the entire property. Some public events, like Family Portrait Day, will take place in the fall depending on production schedules.

“We are delighted to see this historic district undergo much-needed renovations and upgrades,” said Department of Arts and Culture Director Dr. Shelle Sanchez. “The Rail Yards remains a popular place to host events. We look forward to partnering with community organizations to bring more arts and culture programs and public events to this space.


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Lehman College hosts shows, concerts and cultural activities throughout October https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/lehman-college-hosts-shows-concerts-and-cultural-activities-throughout-october/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/lehman-college-hosts-shows-concerts-and-cultural-activities-throughout-october/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 00:49:01 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/lehman-college-hosts-shows-concerts-and-cultural-activities-throughout-october/ By SÍLE MOLONEY Lehman CollegePhoto by Ruth Yesenia Pazmino Lehman College hosts a number of performances, concerts and cultural activities throughout the year. Events are open to the public and admission is free, unless otherwise specified. Below is a list of what’s happening for the rest of October. October 5 On Freedom and Forgiveness: A […]]]>

By SÍLE MOLONEY

Lehman College
Photo by Ruth Yesenia Pazmino

Lehman College hosts a number of performances, concerts and cultural activities throughout the year. Events are open to the public and admission is free, unless otherwise specified. Below is a list of what’s happening for the rest of October.

October 5

On Freedom and Forgiveness: A Conversation with Ray Hinton

The Office of Campus Life and the Lehman Reentry Committee welcome prison reform advocate Anthony Ray Hinton, author of “The Sun Does Shine”. Hinton survived 30 years on Alabama death row. Its story is a decades-long journey towards freedom and freedom. In 2018, he published his book which was shortlisted for the Oprah’s Book Club and is a New York Times bestseller. This event takes place on Tuesday October 5th 5:30 p.m. RSVP for this online presentation at CLUBS.LEHMAN.EDU.

October 5

Eye Tracking and UX Research to Inform Design: Jennifer Romano

Jennifer Romano is a researcher and user experience (UX) manager at Google and is an established leader in the UX field. His research specialties include usability, eye tracking, survey design, experimental design, and cognitive aging. Eye tracking is a unique technology that allows UX researchers to study eye movements to better understand how people perceive information.

In this talk, Romano will discuss what eye tracking adds to studies, use real-world examples where eye tracking has been used to inform design, and discuss how eye tracking can reveal information to particular populations, such as the elderly. The event will take place on Tuesday, October 5 at 1 p.m.

October 5 – 26

“The Eyes Have It”: Sara Little Turnbull’s Annual Guest Designer Speaker Series

The annual Sara Little Turnbull Visiting Designer speaker series, a program that aims to attract more women and minorities to design, resumes this fall with a six-speaker program, “The Eyes Have It”. The series will focus on design and the eye, both human and technological, to examine the themes of visualization, technological mediation, perception and surveillance as pressing societal issues.

The presentations take place online every Tuesday at 1 p.m. and are moderated by David Schwittek, Assistant Professor of Digital Media & Graphic Design in the Art Department at Lehman College. Click on here save.

12 october

The Dark Database: Facial recognition and its “failure” to register: Dennis Delgado

Dennis Delgado is an artist and visual arts teacher born in the South Bronx whose work examines the ideologies of colonialism and their historical presence in the present moment. Whether working with video games, drone footage, or viewing historic sites (like the Bronx Zoo), his practice reflects Eurocentric perspectives present in popular institutions and in American visual culture.

The Dark Database: facial recognition and its “failure” at registration examines the Dark Database project, which is examining the presence of darkness in facial recognition systems. It recognizes systems favoring Caucasian skin as the central definition of skin tone. This event takes place on Tuesday, October 12 at 1 p.m.

12 october

Latinx Researchers and Research

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, the CUNY Institute for Health Equity will host panel discussions on the research and leadership of key organizations. Discuss professional trajectories and the impact of their scholarship on communities and populations. Panel Chairs: Fernando Delgado, President of Lehman College, and Juan DelaCruz, Director of the Institute of Mexican Studies at CUNY. This event takes place on Tuesday, October 12 at 11:30 a.m. here.

October 15 – 16

OPEN BORDERS: TRANSLATION AND ITS DANGERS: A virtual conference exploring the advantages and dangers of translation across genres, theory and post-colonialism. Organized by Professors Lehman Alexandra Coller and Amin Erfani, Department of Languages ​​and Literatures, this virtual conference via Zoom includes a presentation on October 15 at 4 p.m. by Christopher Winks of Queens College – CUNY and other speakers from around the world.

The conference is sponsored by the School of Arts & Humanities at Lehman College and the doctoral programs in French, Italian, Spanish and Comparative Literature at the Graduate Center at City University of New York. Click on to see the full conference program.

Friday October 15, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Join via Zoom link

Meeting ID: 885 9621 3576, Access Code: 314933

Saturday October 16 from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Join via Zoom link

Meeting number: 821 5220 1458, access code: 810549

October 19

Peep-o-rama and other adventures in the perception of the 21st century: Carla Gannis

Carla Gannis is an interdisciplinary artist, educator, speaker and designer based in Brooklyn, New York. She produces works that examine the bizarre complications between grounded and virtual reality, nature and artifice, science and science fiction in contemporary culture. She is known for combining digital imagery with well-known works of art such as her 2013 emoji version of the painting by Hieronymus Bosch The Garden of Earthly Delights.

His work has been featured in exhibitions, screenings and publications around the world and has been featured in Wired and Fast business. This event takes place on Tuesday, October 19 at 1 p.m.

October 26

Surveillance, Subversion and Seduction: Zach Blas

Zach Blas is an assistant professor, artist, filmmaker, and writer whose practice spans moving image, computation, theory, performance, and science fiction.

Blas addresses the materiality of digital technologies while bringing out the philosophies and imaginaries hidden in artificial intelligence, biometric recognition, predictive policing, airport security, the Internet and biological warfare. He has exhibited, lectured and organized screenings in international venues including the de Young Museum, Tate Modern, Walker Art Center, Gwangju Biennale 2018, 68th Berlin International Film Festival, Matadero Madrid, Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Institute of Contemporary Arts Singapore. This event takes place on Tuesday, October 26 at 1 p.m.

As reported, Lehman College just hosted the New York International Book Fair from October 3-5. The sessions can still be viewed online. Check out our story for more information.


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PCHS hosts a successful fall rally https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pchs-hosts-a-successful-fall-rally/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pchs-hosts-a-successful-fall-rally/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 13:00:29 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pchs-hosts-a-successful-fall-rally/ EATON – The Preble County Historical Society held their annual fall gathering from Saturday September 25 through Sunday September 26. While the fall gathering was only due to start on Saturday, the festivities began on Friday with two ribbon cuts organized for the opening of a new trail and the Society’s new outdoor education and […]]]>

EATON – The Preble County Historical Society held their annual fall gathering from Saturday September 25 through Sunday September 26.

While the fall gathering was only due to start on Saturday, the festivities began on Friday with two ribbon cuts organized for the opening of a new trail and the Society’s new outdoor education and events center. historical.

In addition to exhibits open all weekend, Saturday there were performances at the Historical Society‘s open-air amphitheater, including Preble County Line Band and 4Low Band.

“On Saturday we had an incredible turnout,” said Lisa White, executive director of business, marketing and education at PCHS. “We had 10 hay drives that were completely full, full of people. We had Dale Lewis, the chainsaw artist who carved our new educational owl all day in the education center, which is awesome. He’s going to be the Education Center mascot, so we’re excited about that. Benjamin Anspaugh came over and gave a presentation on how to make historic coffee, which is really cool. He was cooking over there in the log house, so people really enjoyed that. We had our re-enactors, and we asked the people of Antler Ridge to do beekeeping programs. “

On Sunday, in addition to other amphitheater performances by the Richmond Jazz Orchestra and Soul2Soul, an a capella group from the University of Miami, the Historical Society inducted three new members into the Hall of Honor.

According to their website, “To celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2011, the Preble County Historical Society (PCHS) established a Hall of Honor. The PCHS Board of Trustees has designated the Hall of Honor as the Sara Swartsel Hall of Honor in recognition of the legacy and philanthropy of the Swartsel family, as evidenced by Sara’s enduring donation to the Preble County Historical Society and to his family’s Preble County community. farm in southeast Preble County.

Class 2021 is the eleventh class of members. The criteria for inductees are as follows: inductees must be deceased and have lived in Preble County at some point in their life; in addition, they must meet one or more of the following requirements: have been outstanding in the fields of agriculture, the arts, the professions, politics, public service, education or sports; or have a reputation that brings honor to the county, or a personal commitment and service to the county; or had a lasting impact on the county.

Inductees for 2021 included Gregory Alan Arnett, William Morton Hildebolt and Horace “Junior” Kramer.

Gregory’s induction plaque reads: “Arnett loved people and demonstrated that love by mentoring and mentoring people professionally and in community organizations. He has directed the Preble County Historical Society, the Preble County Park District, the New Paris Kiwanis, and the National Trail Athletics Hall of Fame. He went from a line chemist to a national coach during his 38-year career with Cargill. “

William’s plaque induction reads: “One of Ohio State University’s ‘100 Buckeyes You Should Know’, Hildebolt has had a distinguished career in food science and environment. He held over 20 patents and recorded his role as the primary inventor of Prego spaghetti sauce in his book “It’s in There!”. In Preble County, he expanded the family farm to over 800 acres and secured his legacy as a 200-year-old single-family property recognized by the state of Ohio.

Horace’s plaque enthronement reads: “Known as an ‘auctioneer,’ Kramer conducted over 10,000 auctions during his 70-year career and was inducted into the Temple of the fame of the Ohio Auctioneers Association. He initiated the Preble County 4H Champions Sale and provided leadership and charity auctions for the American Legion, Eaton Little League, Eaton Country Club and many other community organizations. He facilitated the donation of his farm by Sara Swartsel to the Preble County Historical Society.

Nominations to the Hall of Honor can be made by visiting the Preble County Historical Society website at www.preblecountyhistoricalsociety. org and uploading an application to fill out and submit. You can also email the Company at lisa@preblecountyhistoricalsociety.com or call the Company at 937-787-4256 and leave a message requesting a nomination form.

“Turnout was good,” White said of the weekend. “We were very happy. The artisans, the salespeople were very happy, so they had a good steady flow of people. I think that was great, especially our first year back after being canceled last year.”

White urged those who have not yet done so to join the Preble County Historical Society.

“Thanks to everyone who showed up to support us and took a bit of history this weekend and continue to support us,” she said. “I want to cheer – a lot of people said they wished they knew. My advice would be to make sure they sign up to become a member so they can be on our monthly mailing list. They can see and follow all the activities and events of the Historical Society.

For more information, visit www.preblecountyhistoricalsociety.com.

Gregory Alan Arnett, William Morton Hildebolt and Horace “Junior” Kramer were all inducted into the Hall of Honor on Sunday September 26th.

Three new members inducted into the Hall of Honor

Contact Braden Moles at 937-683-4056 or on Twitter @BradenMoles


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Kennebunkport Renaissance man honored at 105 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kennebunkport-renaissance-man-honored-at-105/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kennebunkport-renaissance-man-honored-at-105/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 22:16:13 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kennebunkport-renaissance-man-honored-at-105/ It would be difficult – indeed, impossible – to dispute Peter Whalon’s description of his friend Frank Handlen as a “Renaissance man.” During his 105 years, Handlen was a gifted shipyard worker, carpenter and artist who donated dozens of his paintings to organizations in Kennebunkport and surrounding areas for auction to raise funds. Oh, and […]]]>

It would be difficult – indeed, impossible – to dispute Peter Whalon’s description of his friend Frank Handlen as a “Renaissance man.”

During his 105 years, Handlen was a gifted shipyard worker, carpenter and artist who donated dozens of his paintings to organizations in Kennebunkport and surrounding areas for auction to raise funds. Oh, and there’s this 40-foot sailboat that he built in his backyard. And his sculpture of a fisherman and his wife, commemorating the town’s first inhabitants, which can be found in the village square of Kennebunkport.

Frank Handlen’s 1995 sculpture “Our Ancestors on the Coast” at Kennebunkport Village Green is one of the many lifelong accomplishments for which Handlen was honored on Friday by the Kennebunkport Historical Society. Ben McCanna / Personal Photographer

On Friday, the Kennebunkport Historical Society honored Handlen with an hour-long talk from Whalon, a past president of the historical society, about his friend, followed by a reception and birthday cake. Handlen walked in on his own – he had a walker, but seemed to do little to no work at all – and made a few remarks on his own after Whalon recounted a remarkable life.

Handlen was born on September 26, 2016 in Brooklyn, New York, but there is an intriguing story to even this mundane fact. Whalon said the 26th was the date of Handlen’s birth certificate, although Handlen’s mother always insisted he was born on the 27th.

The Handlens moved to New Jersey, where a family friend told Handlen after graduating from high school that Maine was a land of opportunity, especially for an artist.

So at 18 he came north to Biddeford Pool, worked in a shipyard, and continued to paint – seascapes and boats at anchor were favorite subjects – to the side. During World War II he was not drafted as he was 25, married and had two children, but he did contribute to the war effort by helping to assemble machine guns.

He moved to Kennebunkport in 1970, where he indulged his passion for shipbuilding by hand-building a 40-foot sailboat, often using tools he himself made, in his garden. After four years of construction, the launch was apparently quite a city event, with the boat being trucked through Dock Square to be christened and launched in the Kennebunk River.

Frank Handlen, 105, blows out a candle on a birthday cake on Friday with the Kennebunkport Historical Society, which honored him as the city’s oldest resident. Ben McCanna / Personal Photographer

Without any assurance that it would not sink immediately, Handlen “seriously considered launching it at night, without a moon,” Whalon said, but the Salt Wind remained afloat and frequently carried Handlen and his second wife offshore. coasts of New England and as far as the Bahamas.

But art has always been at the center of Handlen’s life, Whalon said, and at one point his work caught the attention of Charles Cawley, founder of MBNA, a rapidly growing credit card issuer.

Cawley bought a few of Handlen’s paintings – then a few more, and more after that, Whalon said.

“Cawley was like an ATM for Frank,” Whalon said.

Handlen listened and chuckled as Whalon recounted his stories, then stood to add some personal remarks. And, he told the fifty or so people present at the historical society gathering that he still paints daily – but, “honestly, I had to give up tap dancing.”


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Much More Than Chocolate: Hershey History Center tells a story of the Township of Derry stretching back almost three centuries. https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/much-more-than-chocolate-hershey-history-center-tells-a-story-of-the-township-of-derry-stretching-back-almost-three-centuries/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/much-more-than-chocolate-hershey-history-center-tells-a-story-of-the-township-of-derry-stretching-back-almost-three-centuries/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 10:45:17 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/much-more-than-chocolate-hershey-history-center-tells-a-story-of-the-township-of-derry-stretching-back-almost-three-centuries/ Hershey History Center Lisa Maloy has an affinity for locomotives. As a volunteer with the Hershey History Center, the popular historical society of the Township of Derry, she relishes the opportunity to put her passion to work. “You could travel in the day by train and streetcar and just walk around the country,” said Maloy. […]]]>

Hershey History Center

Lisa Maloy has an affinity for locomotives.

As a volunteer with the Hershey History Center, the popular historical society of the Township of Derry, she relishes the opportunity to put her passion to work.

“You could travel in the day by train and streetcar and just walk around the country,” said Maloy. “And Hershey, Derry Township, is just one stop on it all.”

This year, the Hershey History Center hosted an exhibition of narrow gauge model trains called the “Chocolate Town Special,” which depicts life in Hershey and Derry Township in the 1920s.

Maloy and the rest of the Hershey History Center team jumped at the chance to put on a limited-time exhibit. It shows period locomotives and wagons amid the main buildings of Chocolate Avenue, as well as the rolling countryside of central Pennsylvania, all in one seamless display.

The now 30-year-old Historical Society began as a way to catalog the rich history of the Township of Derry (Hershey was only given its name in 1903, long after the township was incorporated in 1729).

“We started out as most historical societies start – in the living room of someone’s house,” said Maloy.

At the time, they were called the Derry Township Historical Society, before becoming the Hershey-Derry Township Historical Society.

“And here we are today as the Hershey History Center,” said Maloy.

Despite their name, the Hershey History Center covers a lot more than chocolate and despite Maloy’s interests, the center covers a lot more than trains.

The Hershey History Center aims to be a repository for genealogical research, records, land maps and more. However, they also want to represent the voices and stories that reflect the community. It means covering military history, the history of sport and all the other facets that make the Township of Derry what it is today.

The centre’s executive director, Nikki Soliday, is the only full-time employee working to preserve, promote and interpret the history of the Township of Derry. She works alongside a large number of volunteers dedicated to maintaining the center.

“Our story is more based on the voices of the people — those who created the community, lived in the community,” Soliday said.

Since joining the Hershey History Center, Soliday has learned more about the Hershey Bears hockey team than she expected. The center is home to the world’s largest public collection of Hershey Bears artifacts. The Bears, the seventh longest-serving hockey team in all of North America after the original six in the NHL, are the winningest team in the American Hockey League. The centre’s original documentary, “B’ars to Bears,” covers all of this and more.

Then there is the exhibit which discloses the legacy of brown stone making in Hershey.

“We had one of the most extensive brownstone industries on the East Coast,” Soliday said, adding that countless brownstones in Brooklyn, Boston, St. Louis and beyond have Hershey roots.

The “Dick Winters” exhibit on the decorated World War II veteran is an event not to be missed.

“He lived here in town on Elm Avenue,” Soliday said of Winters.

When Winters died, he donated his entire collection to the center. The collection then inspired the book and the HBO miniseries produced by Steven Spielberg, “Band of Brothers”.

As they compete with Entertainment, Amusement, and other organizations with significant foundations, they want to be the historical repository of the community.

The Hershey History Center has an archival library, museum, and event space, and the company runs off-site programs as well. The 24th Annual Preservation Gala will be held at Sainte-Jeanne-d’Arc Parish on October 2. This year’s theme, “La Festa Italiana”, pays homage to the rich Italian history of the Hershey region.

And, of course, the center is now gearing up for its most popular feature: the annual Holiday Train Show.

Looking ahead, a few other permanent exhibits are underway, focused on Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Hershey Estates.

Often times the Hershey History Center looks like a hidden gem, but they don’t want to be hidden away.

“We think we’re pretty cool, but we don’t want to be strangers,” Soliday said.

The Hershey History Center is located at 40 Northeast Dr., Hershey. For more information visit www.hersheyhistory.org.

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