Historical Organizations – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:05:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Historical Organizations – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 MDA partners with NGO to use historical satellite data to fight illegal fishing https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/mda-partners-with-ngo-to-use-historical-satellite-data-to-fight-illegal-fishing/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/mda-partners-with-ngo-to-use-historical-satellite-data-to-fight-illegal-fishing/ Lacey Malarky, Oceana’s illegal fishing and transparency campaign manager, monitors the GPS location of a fishing boat in the Atlantic Ocean from her computer at the headquarters of the NGO Oceana on June 10, 2019 in Washington, DC .ERIC BARADAT An organization dedicated to monitoring illegal fishing will use satellite data from a major Canadian […]]]>

Lacey Malarky, Oceana’s illegal fishing and transparency campaign manager, monitors the GPS location of a fishing boat in the Atlantic Ocean from her computer at the headquarters of the NGO Oceana on June 10, 2019 in Washington, DC .ERIC BARADAT

An organization dedicated to monitoring illegal fishing will use satellite data from a major Canadian space company to help guide sea patrols and other law enforcement activities.

Global Fishing Watch announced at a United Nations conference in Lisbon on Tuesday that it will use 14 years of archived data from MDA Ltd’s Radarsat-2 radar satellite. to identify previously unmonitored fishing activities. David Kroodsma, director of research and innovation at Global Fishing Watch, said the analysis will help determine where and when the coastguard is deploying ships and planes.

Mr Kroodsma said it was difficult to monitor activity at sea until recently. “You have to find the activity patterns to know where you are focusing your patrols,” he said.

According to an oft-cited estimate, “illegal, unregulated and unreported” (IUU) fishing accounts for around one in five fish caught globally. It is often accompanied by forced labour, money laundering, tax evasion and other criminal activities, and is disconcerting to uncover: offenders routinely conceal ownership of vessels and regularly repaint, rename and reflag vessels. ships.

On Monday, US President Joe Biden signed a memorandum to combat IUU fishing. The White House said in a statement that the United States, United Kingdom and Canada will launch an alliance aimed at increasing ambition and momentum in the fight against IUU fishing. Nearly two dozen US federal agencies are due to release a five-year plan to address the problem by the end of next month.

For years, private companies like MDA and organizations like Global Fishing Watch have used analytics technology to monitor illegal fishing. Most large ocean-going vessels are required to have an automatic identification system (AIS) on board, for example, which broadcasts a vessel’s identity and location and helps prevent collisions. These data may reveal movements indicative of standard fishing techniques such as trawling.

Some illegal fishers turn off their AIS before venturing out of bounds, such as into another country’s territorial waters or a marine protected area. (They’re known as “darkships.”) Another tool, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) can detect bright lights at night, but criminals darken to thwart it.

This is where radar satellites come in. Unlike true-color imagery of the type available with Google Earth, they can monitor vast expanses of ocean even when obscured by clouds or darkness. They can also be used to count metal objects in the water, and are therefore useful for identifying large vessels.

Global Fishing Watch previously studied data from the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 radar satellite, which Kroodsma said produced “incredible information”. However, this data only captures fishing activity within a few hundred nautical miles of shore. MDA covers much larger expanses of ocean, he said, and over a longer period of time. Since satellites can detect vessels that have been overnight, the data can provide a more complete picture of fishing activity than AIS alone.

Mr. Kroodsma added that historical data shows that fishing patterns are quite predictable. “So if you can look at what’s happened in the last five months of June in the southern part of the ocean, that gives you an idea of ​​what’s likely to happen this year to plan your patrols.”

He said his organization had identified hundreds of vessels fishing in North Korean waters in violation of UN sanctions. Mike Greenley, CEO of MDA, said some illegal operations coordinate the activities of as many as 300 fishing vessels, supported by others who refuel them and collect and freeze the catch.

“Historical analysis can allow you to analyze the behavior of these operations and how they have evolved,” he said, which can help law enforcement officials in future operations.

Dyhia Belhabib of Ecotrust Canada and Nautical Crime Investigation Services said that until recently most authorities had to guess where to deploy patrols. “Not only did they not catch anything, but it was also very inefficient and illegal fishing was not discouraged,” she said.

Dr Belhabib said the increased use of data and intelligence has led to a “direct increase” in enforcement action. She added, however, that she doesn’t think offenders are reconsidering their activities, in part because the data is rarely enough to prove in court that the crimes took place. Moreover, the penalties are not severe enough in many jurisdictions.

“So, does this have a deterrent effect? This will be the case in the future, but we are not there yet.

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Oakland County Community Calendar for June 26 and Beyond – The Oakland Press https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/oakland-county-community-calendar-for-june-26-and-beyond-the-oakland-press/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 09:34:59 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/oakland-county-community-calendar-for-june-26-and-beyond-the-oakland-press/ Career/education activities • A virtual information session will be held on July 9 for a pre-apprenticeship program at Oakland Community College. The session will discuss OCC’s no-cost pre-apprenticeship program and how it can provide students with a manufacturing career path with OCC employment or apprenticeship with a local partner company. Classes for the next 5-week […]]]>

Career/education activities

• A virtual information session will be held on July 9 for a pre-apprenticeship program at Oakland Community College. The session will discuss OCC’s no-cost pre-apprenticeship program and how it can provide students with a manufacturing career path with OCC employment or apprenticeship with a local partner company. Classes for the next 5-week program begin September 12. Register for the information session at eventbrite.com/e/pre-apprenticeship-program-information-session-tickets-133249473763.

• STEM in Nature Camp, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., July 11-15, Farmington Hills Nature Center at Heritage Park, 24915 Farmington Road, Farmington Hills. There will be an optional evening campfire and evening hike on Thursday, July 14 after camp. Participants ages 12-14 will experience nature up close as they explore and study the forests and rivers of Heritage Park. Call the Nature Center at 248-477-1135 or email Nature Center Supervisor Ashlie Smith at asmith@fhgov.com

• The Oakland County Head Start Enrollment Lounge will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 13 at 196 Cesar E. Chavez Pontiac, OLHSA.org. No need for tickets come rain or shine, ice cream and free games.

• Buckfire & Buckfire, PC with an office in Southfield, offers four annual scholarships to support students who demonstrate a commitment to academic excellence at accredited schools in the United States. Scholarship applications are due October 1, buckfirelaw.com/scholarships.

Charitable activities

• The Gleaners Community Food Bank Food Distribution Event will be held at the Oakland County Farmers Market, 9-11 a.m., June 29, while supplies last, for those in need. Drive-up and stay in the vehicle, or distribution without an appointment, no need for proof of eligibility. For more information, call 248-858-5495 or email OCmarket@oakgov.com.

• Arising Images, a local Lake Orion portrait studio, is offering the opportunity to submit applications for a charitable grant. Organizations must be a 501(c)3 within 75 miles of the Lake Orion community and provide child-focused programs and/or services. Several grants between $15,000 and $30,000 will be awarded. Applications should be submitted by July 31, 248-720-5848.

Farmers Markets/Garden Activities

• Museum at Farmers Market: 10am-11am July 2, downtown walking tour at Downtown Rochester Farmers Market, 202 E. 3rd St. Rochester,rochesterhills.org/museum, free.

• The 15th Annual Southfield Garden Club Walk of Southfield Parks and Gardens will take place June 26 from 2-5pm at 15 gardens in the Beacon Square area, 11 Mile and Winchester. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased the day of the event. The walk starts at the old Leonhard Elementary School in Winchester and Devonshire. A shuttle will make a continuous loop through the neighborhood. Free Leonhard School parking and refreshments are included, southfieldparksandgarden.org.

festivals

• Berkley Pride Block Party is from noon to 4 p.m. June 26, Robina, North at 12 Mile, Downtown Berkley, Entertainment, Music, Games, Food Trucks, Booths, Free Event, downtownberkley.com/berkleypride.

• Annual Michigan Rib Fest: July 1-4, Canterbury Village, 2325 Joslyn Ct., Orion Twp., live entertainment for all ages, ribs and other dishes, monster truck rides, registration for sessions at michiganribfest.com , $7 per person, free for active duty military veterans with ID and children under 3), parking $5.

Golf outings

• Drive for Life Invitational presented by Beaumont Urgent Care by WellStreet East July 11, registration 8:30 a.m., jamming 10 a.m., July 11, Oakland Hills Country Club, 3951 W Maple Rd, Bloomfield Hills, benefiting Walter & Marilyn Wolpin Comprehensive Breast Care Center in Beaumont, Royal Oak and the Wilson Cancer Resource Center in Beaumont, Troy, register at (947) 522-0092 or visit beaumont.org/driveforlife.

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A wonderful day for democracy| National Catholic Registry https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-wonderful-day-for-democracy-national-catholic-registry/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:46:24 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-wonderful-day-for-democracy-national-catholic-registry/ It seems impossible for me to write the following words: Today, the United States Supreme Court overturned the two decisions that had fabricated a constitutional right to legal abortion: Roe vs. Wade and Family planning c. Casey. His opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Center means that the Constitution no longer protects abortion. Abortion […]]]>

It seems impossible for me to write the following words: Today, the United States Supreme Court overturned the two decisions that had fabricated a constitutional right to legal abortion: Roe vs. Wade and Family planning c. Casey. His opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Center means that the Constitution no longer protects abortion. Abortion is again – as it was before the date of the deer opinion, January 22, 1973 – a matter for state legislation.

This long paragraph of the majority opinion summarizes its conclusions:

deer was on a collision course with the Constitution from the day it was decided. deer concluded that the Constitution implicitly conferred the right to obtain an abortion, but that she did not base her decision on text, history, or precedent. It relied on an erroneous historical account; he paid great attention and presumably relied on matters which have no bearing on the meaning of the Constitution; it ignores the fundamental difference between the precedents on which it relies and the question before the Court; he concocted an elaborate set of rules, with different restrictions for each trimester of pregnancy, but he did not explain how this real code could be extracted from anything in the Constitution, the history of the laws on the abortion, precedents or any other source cited; and its most important rule (that states cannot protect fetal life before “viability”) has never been raised by any party and has never been plausibly explained. deer‘s reasoning quickly drew scathing criticism, even from proponents of broad access to abortion.

The Casey plurality, while reaffirming Deer’s central outfit, ostensibly refrained from endorsing most of his reasoning. He revised the textual basis of the right to abortion, silently abandoned deer‘s erroneous historical account, and abandoned the framework of the quarter. But he replaced that diet with an arbitrary “overload” test and relied on an exceptional version of watch the decision which, as explained below, this Court had never applied before and has never invoked since.

Justice Alito wrote the majority opinion for himself and Justices Thomas, Gorsuch, Kavanaugh and Barrett. Justice Roberts, in a deeply disappointing judgment-only agreement, would let deer and Casey standing, and only agree that the Mississippi law could be upheld based on a new standard he just invented on the reasonable opportunity for women to obtain an abortion. Justices Kagan, Sotomayor and Breyer dissented.

Today’s opinion means that some states will continue – as they have done in recent months – to protect unborn human life in the womb according to the will of their people. Others, however, will continue to legislate – as they too have done in recent months – to allow the destruction of human life in the womb at every stage of pregnancy for any reason. Many states will take “in-between” positions, prohibiting abortion at certain times and/or for certain reasons. They could also regulate the conditions under which legal abortions could take place – for example, health facilities, waiting periods, parental involvement, etc. There will be a lot of work for local pro-life organizations to do in all State.

It also seems quite likely that the Court’s pronouncements that the Constitution does not deal with abortion at all – particularly with Justice Kavanaugh’s agreement insisting on this point – will reignite a debate that has been going on since 1973 about whether the 14th Amendment to the Constitution opposite from what Roe had concluded: protect unborn life from intentional destruction. After all, this amendment guarantees: that no state “shall deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws” (emphasis added). Important thinkers are already urging the pro-life movement to move in this direction once more.

Lawyers, activists and the media will spill oceans of ink over this opinion for months and years to come. There are so many wonderful facets that I could immediately spill several gallons myself. But for the sake of length, I’m only highlighting a few key themes below.

First, the Court pointed out that not only respect for abortion, but respect everything since claimed “federal constitutional rights” do not appear in the text of the Constitution itself, the Court will no longer equate them with the personal preferences of five or more unelected judges. Instead, he will consult actual American legal history and tradition, both at the time the claimed constitutional provision was enacted, and from that time to the present, to determine whether the guarantee of ” freedom” of the Constitution includes the claimed right.

Accordingly, the majority opinion scrutinized state abortion laws at the time of the enactment of the 14th Amendment (1868) – the amendment whose “freedom” clause was the claimed source of the right to abortion. He found that a large majority of states in 1868 banned abortion early in pregnancy, and the remaining states did so in the years immediately following. He also cataloged the continued prohibition by states and territories of most or all abortions from that time to the time. Roe vs. Wade was decided in 1973. She therefore forcefully concluded in this part of her opinion that “The inescapable conclusion is that a right to abortion is not deeply rooted in the history and traditions of the Nation. On the contrary, an unbroken tradition of prohibiting abortion on pain of criminal penalties persisted from the earliest days of the common law until 1973.

This is no small legal victory, but a wonderful development that respects democracy. Citizens and states have ratified the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Citizens and states can change the Constitution if they wish. But it’s not up to federal judges to make things up and call it constitutional law.

An interesting aside here. If the Court means what it says here about how “non-textual” constitutional rights are advertised, then Oberfell v. Hodges, the same-sex marriage case, could fall later. This opinion is largely based on a method of reading the Constitution that is now violently repudiated in Dobbs, namely: ignoring the history of the constitutional provision on which the claimed right is based; ignoring the laws of all 50 states from that time to the time of the current case; and instead consult the personal opinions of five judges, the laws of certain foreign countries and the evolution of public opinion not expressed in law. Oberefell also relies heavily on the Casey the patently ridiculous assertion of the opinion that the “liberty” clause of the 14th Amendment protects “the right to define one’s own concept of the existence, meaning, universe, and mystery of human life.”

Repeatedly in its opinion, the Court states that it is not to spill Oberefell, and that is technically correct. But the logic of Dobbssubstantially rejects Oberefell However. Only time will tell if a case arises, providing the Court with an opportunity to reconsider this case.

Second, and equally remarkable for its clarity and meaning, is the Court’s beating of the deer and Casey opinions – not only their holdings, but their absurd and even non-legal “methods”. He calls them “obviously false”. This is the main reason why the Court has decided to deviate from its practice of watch the decision, which implies respecting and applying previous decisions to later cases. Majority Dobbs basically calls deerand Casey garbage – irrational, not legal absurdity.

This is all so obvious as a matter of common sense and legal reasoning that reading it is like reading the best pro-life constitutional legal scholarship of the last 50 years. Every once in a while you must shake your head vigorously and realize that you are reading a Supreme Court majority opinion – the first majority opinion to use constitutional reasoning that respects the document itself, constitutional precedent and democracy, since 1973.

Third, a note on Roberts’ deeply disappointing and legally convoluted opinion. He refuses to engage the majority’s devastating analysis of how the Court (including Roberts himself) promised to interpret the content of the 14th Amendment’s liberty guarantee. It ignores history, tradition and precedents. And he invents a new rule from scratch – exactly as did deer and Casey. It would guarantee women the right to have “real choice”, “adequate opportunity” and “sufficient time” to “decide for themselves”, whether to “exercise the right deer protected. As a result, Roberts would vote to uphold Mississippi’s 15-week ban because it gives women that time and opportunity, but not vote to cancel deer. Thus, he subscribed only to the judgment, but not to the opinion of the majority.

The dissent of Kagan, Breyer and Sotomayor is, predictably, hysterical. She spares no quarter to the interests of any human being before her birth. It completely sidesteps the Majority’s argument about the American people’s democratic choice to protect unborn life from the founding of the country until 1973. It characterizes the Majority as continuing a sexist tradition begun in the 19th century. It predicts future disasters for women’s health, freedom and equality in the future.

June 24, 2022 is a new and wonderful day for life advocates. It is the culmination of relentless effort – relentless scholarship, relentless willingness to endure the slings and arrows of elite opinion, relentless witness to the value of every human life, relentless care for women pregnant and post-abortion mothers and women, and relentless marches, letter-writing campaigns, visits to legislative offices, and fundraising campaigns. It is also a wonderful day for the United States on the world stage. One of the most powerful nations on the planet has stopped declaring the destruction of innocents a “human right” and instead allowed governments to protect helpless human beings. Finally — and allow me this end of jurist — it is a marvelous day for democracy, and for the Constitution which guarantees it.

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The Smithsonian picks four potential locations for women’s and Latino museums https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-smithsonian-picks-four-potential-locations-for-womens-and-latino-museums/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-smithsonian-picks-four-potential-locations-for-womens-and-latino-museums/ Placeholder while loading article actions The Smithsonian narrowed its search of the sites of the future National Museum of Latin American and Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum to four locations on the National Mall. The historic Arts and Industries Building, on Jefferson Drive SW adjacent to the Smithsonian Administration Building known as the Castle, is […]]]>
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The Smithsonian narrowed its search of the sites of the future National Museum of Latin American and Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum to four locations on the National Mall.

The historic Arts and Industries Building, on Jefferson Drive SW adjacent to the Smithsonian Administration Building known as the Castle, is the only site with a structure and the only one under Smithsonian control.

The other three options are undeveloped land: the North West Capitol site, located on the east side of the Mall north of the Capitol Reflecting Pool; the South Monument site, on Jefferson Drive SW, across from the National Museum of African American History and Culture mall; and the Tidal Basin site, home to a rugby pitch and bordered by Raoul Wallenberg Place SW and Maine Avenue SW.

The United States Capitol has jurisdiction over the Northwest Capitol site, and the rest are controlled by the National Park Service. The Arts and Industries Building was envisioned for the African American Museum.

Their proximity to the mall led to their selection, said Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III.

“Thinking about the African American museum, I understood the power of having sites on or near the mall,” said Bunch, the museum’s director. founding director. “It was not my endgame. The process has brought us to this moment, but I understand the power of this symbolism.

In December 2020, Congress authorized the Smithsonian to establish the two museums and set a two-year deadline for selecting their locations. The institution hired the Baltimore Ayers Saint Gross design office to analyze the sites according to six criteria: the symbolism of the place, the existing conditions of the site, access to transport, environmental factors, the cost and the challenges of acquiring the site. The company started with more than two dozen possibilities; the Smithsonian revealed at a public hearing in March that it had narrowed the options down to 14.

Congress authorizes Smithsonian museums focused on Latin Americans and women’s history

Officials will continue to evaluate the four finalists while consulting with members of Congress, the National Capital Planning Commission, the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts and the Capitol’s architect, as required by authorizing legislation. The Smithsonian The Board of Regents is expected to meet the Congress deadline by choosing two sites before the end of the year.

“There is no perfect site,” Bunch said, noting that ongoing analysis will reveal the trade-offs each site has. Officials will need to weigh the size and design challenges of each site and the barriers to land acquisition. The Arts and Industries building will need to be studied to find out how it can be reinvented as a 21st century museum, he said.

Latino Museum backers push for pride of place on National Mall

Defenders of the museums have pushed for them to be built on the mall, considered by many to be the lawn of the country. The two newest Smithsonians, the African American Museum, which opened in 2016, and the National Museum of the American Indian, which opened in 2004, sit at opposite ends of this symbolic space.

Finding a place for each new museum is now more difficult because open space on or near the mall is limited, Bunch said, and finding two at the same time is even more difficult.

“It’s a bit like having children. You have two kids, it’s not just twice the work,” Bunch said. “You want to make sure that each museum feels it has received the respect, the attention, the visibility that it deserves.”

The Board of Regents announcement comes days after the opening of the Molina Family Latino Gallery at the National Museum of American History. As a precursor to Latino museum, gallery will host exhibits and programs until the museum opens.

The Smithsonian has assembled advisory boards for both museums. Jorge Zamanillo was hired as founding director of the Latino Museum earlier this year. Officials interview candidates for the position of director of the Women’s History Museum.

Zamanillo said he was excited about all the options.

“Whatever the choice, I’m sure we’ll build a significant and amazing museum,” he said. “But what impresses me the most is the rigor and transparency of the process. We informed everyone, met people from the community, national and local leaders of Latin American organizations. For me, it’s the best thing that came out of it. »

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The Pryor Center presents “The Arkansas Delta Blues” Wednesday, June 22 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-pryor-center-presents-the-arkansas-delta-blues-wednesday-june-22/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 05:10:55 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-pryor-center-presents-the-arkansas-delta-blues-wednesday-june-22/ Photo by Orson Weems “The Juke Joint Project: An Exhibition” As part of the Pryor Center Presents lecture series, blues historian Cliff E. Jones will present “The Arkansas Delta Blues” at 6 p.m., Wednesday, June 22, at the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History in the Fulbright […]]]>



Photo by Orson Weems

“The Juke Joint Project: An Exhibition”

As part of the Pryor Center Presents lecture series, blues historian Cliff E. Jones will present “The Arkansas Delta Blues” at 6 p.m., Wednesday, June 22, at the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History in the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. The conference is organized in collaboration with The Juke Joint project: an exhibition, which is co-sponsored by the Pryor Center and The Music Education Initiative and is currently on display in the atrium of the Pryor Center.

The conference will take place in person and via Zoom. If you would like to attend virtually, please register in advance with an email address associated with your Zoom account. Registration is not required for in-person participation.

The Arkansas Delta Blues played an important role in the development of American music. The area maintained a vibrant blues scene from the 1920s through the 1970s. Early blues musicians such as Son House, Robert Johnson, Johnny Shines, and Howlin’ Wolf performed at area juke joints and cafes. Folklorist Alan Lomax recorded St. Francis County blues musicians on his Southern Journey expedition in 1959 and chronicled these experiences in his classic work, The land where the The blues have started. Over the following decades, many musicians died and the music changed, but the stories of these legendary artists and their important cultural contributions remain strong.

In conversation with Rex Nelson, Jones said, “Mississippi has done a great job preserving and promoting its history of blues music. It has a trail of historical landmarks, festivals, magazines, and college conferences. But the Arkansas Delta was also home to a vibrant blues scene from the 1920s through the 1970s. This history is still alive but rare. We must support all efforts to record, document and perform the Arkansas blues. Jones’ presentation will highlight some of Arkansas’ connections to the blues and share stories from those who attended the performances and frequented the venues.

Jones is associate director of the Delta Center for Economic Development at Arkansas State University. He began his career as Executive Assistant to the Chancellor and Assistant Instructor at Baton Rouge Community College. Jones later served as a founding faculty member and department chair, then dean of arts and technology at Cy-Fair College in Texas. He returned to Arkansas in 2008, working as Vice Chancellor for Academics at the University of Arkansas Community College in Batesville. He later served as Senior Vice Chancellor for Learning and Teaching at Arkansas State University Mid-South.

Jones received his BSBA and MPA degrees from the U of A and his Ph.D. in Educational Administration from the University of Texas at Austin.

Register to attend via Zoom at the Pryor Center Presents Cliff E. Jones – “The Arkansas Delta Blues”.

The Pryor Center is located at 1 E. Center St., Suite 120. The event is free and open to the public, and parking is available in Fayetteville Square.

About the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History: The David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History is an oral history program whose mission is to document the history of Arkansas through the collection of spoken memories and visual records, to preserve the collection at life and to connect Arkansans and the world to fundraising through the Internet, television shows, educational programs and other means. The Pryor Center records audio and video interviews about Arkansas history and culture, collects recordings from other organizations, organizes those recordings into archives, and provides public access to archives, primarily through the pryorcenter website. uark.edu. The Pryor Center is the state’s only oral and visual history program with a seventy-five county statewide mission to collect, preserve and share audio and moving image recordings of the Arkansas history.

About Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences: The Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences is the largest and most academically diverse unit on campus with three schools, 16 departments, and 43 academic programs and research centers. The college provides the majority of the core curriculum for all University of Arkansas students.

About the University of Arkansas: As Arkansas’ flagship institution, the U of A offers an internationally competitive education in more than 200 academic programs. Founded in 1871, the U of A contributes more than $2.2 billion to the Arkansas economy through teaching new knowledge and skills, entrepreneurship and employment development, discovery through research and creative activity while providing training in professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation ranks the U of A among the few American colleges and universities with the highest level of research activity. US News and World Report ranks the U of A among the top public universities in the nation. Learn how the U of A is working to build a better world at Arkansas Research News.

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Montgomery County Celebrates 25th Annual Juneteenth Event in Germantown https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/montgomery-county-celebrates-25th-annual-juneteenth-event-in-germantown/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 13:02:36 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/montgomery-county-celebrates-25th-annual-juneteenth-event-in-germantown/ Langston Hughes II, pictured playing saxophone, performs with his bandmates at the 25th annual Montgomery County Juneteenth event Saturday at the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown. Thousands of county residents and visitors gathered in and around the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown as the county held its 25th annual Juneteenth event […]]]>

Langston Hughes II, pictured playing saxophone, performs with his bandmates at the 25th annual Montgomery County Juneteenth event Saturday at the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown.

Thousands of county residents and visitors gathered in and around the BlackRock Center for the Arts in Germantown as the county held its 25th annual Juneteenth event on Saturday.

Dozens of vendors lined the brick sidewalks, selling everything from African artwork to energizing tea. Local bands entertained attendees of the BlackRock outdoor stage, and dozens of people enjoyed the facilities inside, ranging from an art exhibit by local artist Alonzo Davis to films celebrating the culture black, dance performances by several local groups and other attractions.

Juneteenth — which was only celebrated at multiple events all weekend — is a federal holiday that recognizes the emancipation of enslaved African Americans.

The County Human Rights Office, along with BlackRock, helped organize the event along with dozens of other partners. Germantown resident Fiona Thomas worked as the volunteer coordinator for the event and said she helped lead about 100 volunteers for the county event.

Jim Stowe, director of the Office of Human Rights, said in an interview that the event has grown significantly since the county began hosting Juneteenth. He was housed in various locations around the county, Stowe added.

Saturday’s event was different from previous years as county officials and other partners worked to include more businesses and partners, including the county library system, historical society, American Film Institute and many other organizations.

“We want everyone to take ownership of this holiday, not just us in the coordinating positions,” Stowe said.

Lynn Arndt, CEO of BlackRock, said the preparation for Saturday’s effort was extensive.

Arndt added that BlackRock sits in the middle of Germantown, one of the most diverse regions in the country. So it’s imperative that the Juneteenth event at BlackRock reflects that diversity not just in Germantown, but for Montgomery County and the entire region, Arndt said.

“In the bigger picture, we’re making a statement about the significance of the date…I think what’s really important is that in this space, on this lawn, on this date, we bring the community together and c is what I try to do every day here,” Arndt said.

“A lot of organizations say they want to reflect their community,” she added. “And unless you’re actually doing things like that, you’re not reflecting that, you’re not.”

Stowe said he hopes Montgomery County can continue to champion its diversity at events like Saturday’s. He added that some communities may struggle to reflect on the nation’s past and the struggles that Juneteenth reflects.

There have been recent challenges, Stowe noted — the murder of George Floyd, the recent mass shootings around the country, among other incidents. But he added that he has seen older and younger generations come together to champion diversity and inclusiveness in the county.

Bad news often fills our minds, Stowe said. But events like Saturday at BlackRock can show us at our best, he added.

Thomas, standing in the volunteer headquarters room on the second floor of BlackRock, agreed. Each time Juneteenth arrives, she thinks of the strength with which her ancestors and others fought for freedom and sees the holiday as an opportunity for all cultures and ethnicities to celebrate those efforts.

There’s always room to grow, Thomas said – but Saturday’s event marked how much has been achieved.

“[It’s] how far we have come, and [how] we still have a lot to do,” said Thomas. “There is a lot going on in the world – not just African Americans, but all culturally and minority. We still have a long way to go. And I just can’t wait for the country to recognize more minorities, open more doors for us, and celebrate everything and everything that we’ve brought to this country.

June 19 events were also held in Kensington and Macedona Baptist Church by the Bethesda African Cemetery Coaltion.

Steve Bohnel can be reached at steve.bohnel@bethesdamagazine.com

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History of the Manistee National Forest Festival https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/history-of-the-manistee-national-forest-festival/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:09:16 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/history-of-the-manistee-national-forest-festival/ The first Manistee National Forest Festival began when a group of like-minded individuals decided to do something different from what had always been done before. Summer festivals have a long and storied history with the town of Manistee. From the late 19th century, the main summer festival was called “Homecoming” as it was not just […]]]>

The first Manistee National Forest Festival began when a group of like-minded individuals decided to do something different from what had always been done before.

Summer festivals have a long and storied history with the town of Manistee. From the late 19th century, the main summer festival was called “Homecoming” as it was not just to celebrate the 4th of July, but to welcome former residents who had moved to Manistee . Alongside the Homecoming, there was a typical series of summer festivities which included dancing, picnics and a parade.


In the summer of 1935, the Homecoming Festival included a tour of the Manistee National Forest as well as a parade that included many displays from the U.S. Forest Service. With this back-to-basics aspect considered a success, it was decided that next year’s summer celebration would be replaced with a forest theme and focus on the Manistee National Forest purchasing unit, which has was created in 1933.

An article published on July 11, 1935 (just days after the Homecoming Festival of that year) explains the formation of a new festival society. Parts of the original article follow:

“From the rich historical background of its early days of logging and the promise held for future forest development throughout the Manistee National Forest, the City and County of Manistee will draw material for an annual forest festival that will rival with any celebration in Michigan, according to plans formulated yesterday afternoon by a group of local men assembled in the Ranger’s office of the Federal Building.

“The Festival, it is expected, will replace the annual 4th of July return, although alumni are invited to attend each year, it will be national in scope, the first effort of its kind in the world to draw attention to the reconstruction of the country’s forest resources.

“Yesterday’s meeting of a small group of interested people was preliminary to the formation of a Forest Festival Corporation, in which all organizations in the city will be represented.

“Work on the Festival will begin immediately, securing some of the necessary funds months before the event. Benefit shows, dancing, games of keno, some held under the auspices of the Festival Corporation and others under cooperating groups have been advanced as a way to raise at least $1,000 in preliminary fundraising efforts before April or May of next year.Full cooperation from the US Forest Service has been assured.

Additionally, it was also noted that the official name of the new festival would be the Manistee National Forest Festival and that its creation, “…is an attempt to bring back the glamor and color of the logging era, to show the area as a summer playground, and to draw attention to the development due in this part of the state as a result of federal and state programs emphasizing conservation, recreation and reforestation.

On July 15, 1935, the Forest Festival Corporation was formally organized with Tom Hauck named president; Harry Musselwhite as Honorary President; Harold Hill, the first vice president; Ted Brown the second vice president; Ewald Pfeiffer, secretary; and George Kruse as treasurer.

Likewise, a number of committees have been formed to assist in the planning of the new festival. The committees included: a planning committee, an advertising director, a special housing committee, an audit committee and a finance committee. The Forest Festival Corporation as well as the committees have also partnered with representatives from local organizations and businesses to help with celebration plans.

Over the months, donations were solicited through letters sent to chains and businesses that served local retailers. Other funds were donated by individuals and businesses and as the $6,000 goal neared its target, local factories chirped every time $500 was donated.

As is tradition with many festivals in the region, the subject of selecting a queen to rule the festivities came up during the early planning stages. In November 1935, a 20-year-old Ottawa woman named Wabisheshikwe, who lived in Lower Brethren Camp near the Manistee River, was named the Indian Festival Princess.

While Wabisheshikwe was originally used as a marketing ploy to promote the Forest Festival, it was later judged that since the festival was to emphasize the old days of logging (with less of emphasis on the modern world), the edict was issued that there would be no queen of rest because “…the celebration of Manistee would gain distinction by eliminating a queen and concentrating on the Indian princess which would be truly symbolic of the whole theme of the festival.”

The list of events and activities that took place (July 2, 3, 4 and 5) during the first festival is exhaustive but included: the inauguration of Chittenden Nursery, a village of Indian tipis displayed near the channel of the Manistee River , naval training ships on display in the channel, coronation baseball games, a State Police exhibit at Rotary Hall, local historical exhibits, forest fire demonstrations, a ceremonial dance in Ottawa, a large parade with 75 allegorical floats, banquets, marching bands, log rolling contests, etc.

On July 6, 1936, the first Manistee National Forest Festival was considered a resounding success with over 50,000 people in attendance. The Forest Festival continued as the town’s summer festival for several years, but was later replaced by the Sports Festival in the 1950s.

After reverting to the Forest Festival, the summer party was replaced by the National Strawberry Festival in 1966. Finally in 1977 it was again replaced by the National Manistee Forest Festival where it continues to be celebrated every 4th of July holiday.

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Active Ingredients Market – In-depth information regarding significant factors influencing market growth https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/active-ingredients-market-in-depth-information-regarding-significant-factors-influencing-market-growth/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:25:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/active-ingredients-market-in-depth-information-regarding-significant-factors-influencing-market-growth/ Market data center The global active ingredients market size is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.2% during the forecast period (2022-2030). Pune, June 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Active Ingredients Market By Vendor Assessment, Technology Assessment, Partner & Customer Ecosystem, Type/Solution, Service, Organization Size, End-Use Industries & Region – […]]]>

Market data center

The global active ingredients market size is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.2% during the forecast period (2022-2030).

Pune, June 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Active Ingredients Market By Vendor Assessment, Technology Assessment, Partner & Customer Ecosystem, Type/Solution, Service, Organization Size, End-Use Industries & Region – Global Active Ingredients Market Forecast to 2030, Released by market data center, the active ingredients market is expected to grow at a steady pace during the forecast period. The presence of key players in the ecosystem has led to a competitive and diverse market. The advancement of digital transformation initiatives across several industries is expected to drive the global Active Ingredients Market over the study period.

This report COVID-19 analysis includes IMPACT COVID-19 on production and demand, supply chain. This report provides detailed historical analysis of the global Active Ingredients market from 2017 to 2021 and provides detailed market forecast from 2022 to 2030 by region/country and sub-sectors. The report covers the revenue, sales volume, price, historical growth and future prospects of the Active Ingredients market.

The global active ingredients market size is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.2% during the forecast period (2022-2030).

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Regional analysis:

Based on geography, the global active ingredients market is segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World (RoW). North America is expected to hold a considerable share of the global active ingredients market. Due to increased investment in the research and development process and adoption of solutions in the region, Asia Pacific is expected to grow at a faster rate during the forecast period.

The growing number of Active Ingredients market players across all regions is expected to further drive the market growth. Additionally, increasing investment by major vendors in product capabilities and business expansion is expected to fuel the market during the study period. Many market players are finding lucrative opportunities in emerging economies like China and India, where large populations are coupled with new innovations in many industries.

Market assessment

Technology Assessment

Supplier evaluation

Market dynamics

Key Innovations

Product scope and capabilities

Trends and Challenges

Adoption trends and challenges

Technological architecture

Drivers and fasteners

Deployment Trends

Competitive differentiation

Regional and industrial dynamics

Industrial applications

Price/performance analysis

Regulation and compliance

Strategy and Vision


In the deep ToC includes

233 – Tables

45 – Numbers

300-pages


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Contents

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1. Market definition
1.2. Market segmentation
1.3. Geographic scope
1.4. Years considered: historical years – 2017 and 2020; Base year – 2021; Forecast Years – 2022 to 2030
1.5. Currency used
2. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
2.1. Research framework
2.2. Data collection technique
2.3. Information source
2.3.1. Secondary sources
2.3.2. Primary sources
2.4. Market estimation methodology
2.4.1. An in-depth approach
2.4.2. Top-down approach
2.5. Data validation and triangulation
2.5.1. Market Forecast Model
2.5.2. Study limitations/assumptions
3. SUMMARY OF THE STUDY
4. ASSESSMENT OF MARKET DYNAMICS
4.1. Insight
4.2. Drivers
4.3. Obstacles/Challenges
4.4. Opportunities
5. VALUE CHAIN ​​ANALYSIS
6. PRICE ANALYSIS
7. SUPPLY CHAIN ​​ANALYSIS
8. MARKET SIZE AND FORECAST
8.1. Global – Active Ingredients Market Analysis and Forecast, By Region
8.2. Global – Active Ingredients Market Analysis and Forecast, By Segment
8.2.1. North America Active Ingredients Market, By Segment
8.2.2. North America Active Ingredients Market, By Country
8.2.2.1. WE
8.2.2.2. Canada
8.2.3. Active Ingredients Market in Europe, by Segment
8.2.4. Active Ingredients Market in Europe, by Country
8.2.4.1. Germany
8.2.4.2. UK
8.2.4.3. France
8.2.4.4. Rest of Europe (ROE)
8.2.5. Asia-Pacific Active Ingredients Market, By Segment
8.2.6. Asia-Pacific Active Ingredients Market, By Country
8.2.6.1. China
8.2.6.2. Japan
8.2.6.3. India
8.2.6.4. Rest of Asia-Pacific (RoAPAC)
8.2.7. Rest of the World (ROW) Active Ingredients Market, By Segment
8.2.8. Rest of the World (ROW) Active Ingredients Market, By Country
8.2.8.1. Latin America
8.2.8.2. Middle East and Africa

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Answers to key questions in this report:

  • How does our portfolio of products and services compare to major competitors?

  • What are the main changes in customer demand given the changing economy?

  • What are the new pricing and consumption models in the market and how should we align our portfolio?

  • What are the main decision factors for service buyers?

  • How can we speed up our bidding process?

  • What is the potential of the active ingredients market?

  • What is the impact of COVID-19 on the Global Active Ingredients Market?

  • What are the major strategies adopted by companies in the Active Ingredients market?

  • What are the challenges faced by SMEs and major vendors in the Active Ingredients market?

  • Which region has the highest investments in the active ingredients market?

  • What is the latest research and activity for the Active Ingredients market?

  • Who are the major players in the Active Ingredients market?

  • What is the potential of the active ingredients market?

Supplier evaluation

Vendor assessment includes an in-depth analysis of how vendors are meeting demand in the active ingredient market. The MDC CompetetiveScape model was used to assess the qualitative and quantitative information for this assessment. MDC’s CompetitiveScape is a structured method for identifying key players and describing their strengths, relevant characteristics and outreach strategy. MDC’s CompetitiveScape enables organizations to analyze the environmental factors that influence their business, set goals and identify new marketing strategies. MDC Research analysts conduct in-depth investigation into solutions, services, programs, marketing, organization size, geographic focus, organization type, and vendor strategies.

Technology Assessment

Technology has a huge impact on business productivity, growth and efficiency. Technologies can help companies develop competitive advantages, but choosing them can be one of the most demanding decisions for companies. Technology assessment helps organizations understand their current technology situation and offers them a roadmap towards which they might want to evolve and grow their business. A well-defined process for evaluating and selecting technology solutions can help organizations reduce risk, achieve their goals, identify the problem, and fix it the right way. Technology assessment can help companies identify which technologies to invest in, meet industry standards, and compete with competitors.

Business ecosystem analysis

Advances in technology and digitalization have changed the way companies do business; the business ecosystem concept helps companies understand how to thrive in this changing environment. Business ecosystems offer organizations the opportunity to integrate technology into their day-to-day business operations and improve their research and business skills. The business ecosystem comprises a network of interconnected businesses that compete and cooperate to increase sales, improve profitability, and succeed in their markets. An ecosystem analysis is a business network analysis that includes the relationships between suppliers, distributors, and end users in the delivery of a product or service.


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Regions and countries covered

North America (US, Canada), Europe (Germany, UK, France, Spain, Italy and Rest of Europe), Asia-Pacific (Japan, China, Australia, India, Rest of Asia- Pacific) and Rest of the world (Line).

Report cover

Active Ingredients Market Dynamics, Impact of Covid-19 on Active Ingredients Market, Vendor Profiles, Vendor Assessment, Strategies, Technology Assessment, Product Mapping, Industry Outlook, Economic Analysis, Segmental Analysis, Market Sizing active ingredients market, analysis charts.

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Wyoming State Archives offers archives and digitization workshop https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wyoming-state-archives-offers-archives-and-digitization-workshop/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 21:40:25 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wyoming-state-archives-offers-archives-and-digitization-workshop/ CHEYENNE — The Wyoming State Historical Records Advisory Board (WY SHRAB) has announced that it is hosting a free two-day workshop on archiving and digitizing. The Archives and Digitization 101 workshop is scheduled to take place June 21-22 at the Wyoming State Library. During this event, attendees will learn basic archival best practices for managing, […]]]>

CHEYENNE — The Wyoming State Historical Records Advisory Board (WY SHRAB) has announced that it is hosting a free two-day workshop on archiving and digitizing.

The Archives and Digitization 101 workshop is scheduled to take place June 21-22 at the Wyoming State Library. During this event, attendees will learn basic archival best practices for managing, preserving, and digitizing collections. Those working with local history collections or working in smaller archival repositories and those who may have no formal archival training are encouraged to attend.

While day one will be instructor-led sessions by Leigh Jeremias and Amy Hitchner, day two of the workshop is dedicated to one-on-one sessions with historical collections specialists for collections advice or hands-on training in scanning. Digitization kits will be provided for use by the Colorado State Library. Digitization kits from the WY SHRAB via the Wyoming State Archives will be available for viewing. Participants will learn how to consult a digitization kit for their own historical collection needs.

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Leigh Jeremias is the Digital Collections Coordinator for the Colorado State Library, where she manages the Colorado Historical Newspaper Collection and the Plains to Peaks Collective, the Colorado-Wyoming Service Center of the Digital Public Library of America. Ms. Jeremias has over 21 years of experience in making historical collections more accessible to the widest audience possible. She has extensive experience in the development, care and refinement of archival and digital collections as well as knowledge of multiple collections management databases, metadata schemas and aggregations, copyright and appraisal. risk and project management.

Prior to working at the State Library, Ms. Jeremias worked at History Colorado and the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, PA. In her current role, she works to expand state and national access to all types of historical collections found in small and large cultural heritage institutions.

Amy Hitchner is Manager of Metadata and Integration Services at Colorado State Library, where she manages CVL Collections, a program that helps small cultural heritage organizations bring their digital collections online using the Omeka platform. The program is also an on-ramp to participate in the Plains to Peaks Collective, the Colorado and Wyoming center of the Digital Public Library of America. In addition to managing CVL collections, Amy publishes the Friday Grab Bag, a weekly series highlighting Colorado library programs and events. She has 15 years of library experience in cataloguing, metadata, technical services, electronic resources, serials, and collections management in university and school libraries.

For more information about the council and events, please contact Sara Davis, WY SHRAB Coordinator and Wyoming State Archivist, Wyoming State Archives, Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources at (307 ) 777-8691, or visit the SHRAB website. Please email Sara Davis, sara.davis@wyo.gov, and/or Leigh Jeremias, ljeremias@coloradovirtuallibrary.org for more information about this workshop.

The Wyoming SHRAB promotes the identification, preservation, and dissemination of historical state records, encouraging and supporting continuing education programs for state, tribal, and local governments, local repositories, organizations, and other individuals involved in archival preservation in Wyoming. Grants are made available by the Wyoming SHRAB through the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. The program is administered by the Wyoming State Archives, part of the Department of State Parks and Cultural Resources.

Please contact Sara Davis at the Wyoming State Archives at 307-777-8691, email sara.davis@wyo.gov, or use the online form at to register for the workshop.

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Virginia Museum of History & Culture reopens after $30 million renovation https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/virginia-museum-of-history-culture-reopens-after-30-million-renovation/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:35:45 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/virginia-museum-of-history-culture-reopens-after-30-million-renovation/ Published on Friday, June 10, 2022 at 5:32 p.m. Join the 100,000 AFP subscribers on Facebook Buy an AFP subscription Subscribe to AFP podcasts on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Pandora News, press releases, letters to the editor: [email protected] Advertising requests: [email protected] The Virginia Museum of History & Culture has reopened after a landmark reimagining of […]]]>

Virginia Museum of History and CultureThe Virginia Museum of History & Culture has reopened after a landmark reimagining of the Richmond-based institution.

Through its collection of more than 9 million objects, its renowned research library, its galleries and its public programs, the VMHC shares the history of Virginia and the United States.

On opening weekend, more than 4,000 visitors enjoyed a renewed, innovative and welcoming museum experience after the most comprehensive and transformative renovation in the institution’s nearly 200-year history.

Designed to engage, inform and inspire, the revamped museum seeks to open the minds of young and old, offer different perspectives and make connections between then and now by presenting history through a fresh lens and accessible.

The exhibits on display now include:

  • Our Commonwealth: A permanent exhibition under a marquee is the centerpiece of the museum’s novelties. It offers an in-depth, multi-sensory exploration of Virginia’s five major regions, featuring stories and artifacts from partner organizations and cultural institutions across the state.
  • American Democracy: A great leap of faith: An exhibit curated by the Smithsonian that brings America’s Great Experiment of Democracy to life
  • Virginia Treasures: Featuring artifacts associated with Virginians who, through extraordinary leadership and creativity, have worked to shape the future of our state and nation
  • Commonwealth Explorers: A new interactive learning space for the museum’s youngest visitors
  • Story Questions: An introductory exhibit that talks about how history connects us all

The new Orientation Theater screens “Imagine Virginia,” a 17-minute film highlighting moments and scenes from Virginia’s history.

VMHC is owned and operated by the Virginia Historical Society – a private, nonprofit organization established in 1831.

For more information, visit VirginiaHistory.org

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