Historical Organizations – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:54:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Historical Organizations – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Inauguration of the Texas and Pacific Railway Depot Rehabilitation Project https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/inauguration-of-the-texas-and-pacific-railway-depot-rehabilitation-project/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:54:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/inauguration-of-the-texas-and-pacific-railway-depot-rehabilitation-project/ The following was communicated to us by the Cane River National Heritage Area: NATCHITOCHES, La. – The Town of Natchitoches, Cane River National Heritage Area, Cane River Creole National Historical Park and DSW Construction held a groundbreaking ceremony for the Texas and Pacific Railway Depot Rehabilitation Project on Thursday, January 13, 2022 . The Texas […]]]>

The following was communicated to us by the Cane River National Heritage Area:

NATCHITOCHES, La. – The Town of Natchitoches, Cane River National Heritage Area, Cane River Creole National Historical Park and DSW Construction held a groundbreaking ceremony for the Texas and Pacific Railway Depot Rehabilitation Project on Thursday, January 13, 2022 .

The Texas and Pacific Railway Depot was built in 1927 and closed to passenger rail in the 1960s, encapsulating its separate entrances and waiting rooms. Today, the structure remains one of the last segregated train stations in Louisiana and has a deep connection to the city’s African American community.

“For nearly four decades, the community of Natchitoches has attempted to preserve and rehabilitate the Depot into a museum that depicts the stories of African Americans in Natchitoches,” noted Rebecca Blankenbaker, executive director of the National Heritage Area of CaneRiver. “Today is a celebration of all those people and partner organizations who have shared their energy and passion to bring this project to fruition,” Blankenbaker continued. Early efforts by the Cane River National Heritage Area in 2001, 2007, and 2015 stabilized the structure until future use could be determined.

Edd Lee (City of Natchitoches), Rebecca Blankenbaker (Cane River National Heritage Area), Ronnie Williams, Jr. (Mayor of the Town of Natchitoches), Carrie Mardorf (Cane River Creole National Historical Park), Randy LaCaze (City of Natchitoches) , and David Mains (DSW Construction).(Source: Cane River National Heritage Area)

The grand opening marks the start of the rehabilitation of the depot to house new park offices, a visitor center and a conference hall/community theater for the Cane River Creole National Historical Park. “We are honored to be able to tell the difficult story of slavery to segregation to civil rights with the walls of the Depot, where we can tell all the stories of all the people of Natchitoches,” commented Cane River Superintendent Carrie Mardorf. National Creole. Historical park. “Since the construction of the Depot in 1927, 95 years ago, the building has withstood decades of use, followed by long periods of neglect and limited repairs. We are extremely grateful to be a partner in this project and are excited to be the building’s new stewards and tenants for the next 95 years,” continued Mardorf.

In 2019, the town of Natchitoches, which owns the Texas and Pacific Railway Depot, signed a lease with the National Park Service, Cane River Creole National Historical Park granting the park use of the building as a visitor center and headquarters.

(Source: Cane River National Heritage Area)

“On behalf of the Town of Natchitoches, we are thrilled to embark on this project with the National Park Service, DSW Construction and Cane River National Heritage Area,” remarked Mayor Ronnie Williams, Jr. He continued his remarks by stating, “Not only will this rehabilitation project serve to spark more community revitalization efforts in the surrounding area, but also encourage economic development in West Natchitoches.

Other speakers included Claire Prymus of the Ben D. Johnson Educational Center, Edward Ward, Jr. of the Natchitoches Black Heritage Committee, Randy LaCaze of the Town of Natchitoches Community Development Office and David Mains, owner of DSW Construction.

Copyright 2022 Cane River National Heritage Area. All rights reserved.

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Orchestra 914 connects to Westchester https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/orchestra-914-connects-to-westchester/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:00:38 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/orchestra-914-connects-to-westchester/ Music Director Russell Ger promises to present “accessible, energizing, open” music. After a pandemic hiatus that lasted for a year, the former Chappaqua Orchestra has a new leader, a new home base and a new identity. After the suspension of public performances from March 2020, the group was anything but inactive during their forced hiatus. […]]]>
Music Director Russell Ger promises to present “accessible, energizing, open” music.

After a pandemic hiatus that lasted for a year, the former Chappaqua Orchestra has a new leader, a new home base and a new identity.

After the suspension of public performances from March 2020, the group was anything but inactive during their forced hiatus.

He hired an Australian Russell ger as musical director, moved to Pleasantville of Chappaqua, and renamed itself Orchestra 914 (O914), underlining its new mission to reach a wider audience, regardless of location.

Founded in 1958 as the Chappaqua Orchestra, O914 was originally a local affair, with a mix of amateur and professional musicians. Today, the 39 members of the orchestra are professional musicians.

***

O914 will perform at the Ossining Library (13 Feb., a brass trio), at Supreme Hudson Valley (March 20), and Chappaqua Performing Arts Center (April 23).

Co-Executive Director of the 914 Orchestra David Restivo, also the group’s violinist, calls Paramount an “incredible historic hall,” noting that Leonard Bernstein executed there.

The orchestra continues its Concertos Competition, open to “Juniors” (12 to 17/18 years old) and to “Seniors” (18 to 25 years old). It culminates with a winners concert at Paramount Hudson Valley on May 21, 2022.

The orchestra’s annual family concerts will take place at Tarrytown Music Hall March 6, 2022 (on the theme “Music is science”) and at the Chappaqua Performing Arts Center April 23, 2022. The program highlights the community with special needs playing with the orchestra.

***

Maestro Russell Ger, who graduated at the top of his class in 2010 at Boston Conservatory at Berklee, exudes enthusiasm for his new role as Music Director: “O914’s mission aligns with my personal mission: to present music as accessible, energizing and open. I personally guarantee it! (He might not be a native of New York but he’s already channeling Joe willie namath.)

To enhance the audience’s appreciation of music during performances, Ger will briefly discuss each piece, communicating “the expression, color and content that the piece demands.”

Regarding the move to Pleasantville, Restivo says that O914 wanted “to find a community that is dedicated to the arts and thrives in it.” We believe Pleasantville has a proven track record as a city committed to cultural organizations, such as Jacob Burns Cinema Center, ARC Steps, Pleasantville Music Festival and Pleasantville Farmers Market. “

> orchestra914.org/performances

Lee Hemphill, resident of Briarcliff Manor, regularly contributes to North River Log.

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Organizations Address Health Equity Issues, To Receive $ 1.2 Million In Grants From Connecticut Health Foundation – Connecticut by the Numbers https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/organizations-address-health-equity-issues-to-receive-1-2-million-in-grants-from-connecticut-health-foundation-connecticut-by-the-numbers/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 01:26:27 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/organizations-address-health-equity-issues-to-receive-1-2-million-in-grants-from-connecticut-health-foundation-connecticut-by-the-numbers/ Discretionary grants, selected by Foundation President Tiffany Donelson, are awarded to organizations and institutions that meet the foundation’s overall mission or priority areas. CT Health Access, Hartford: $ 25,000 – This funding will support the first phase of establishing a Broker Academy to increase the number of trusted, local and culturally competent insurance brokers in […]]]>

Discretionary grants, selected by Foundation President Tiffany Donelson, are awarded to organizations and institutions that meet the foundation’s overall mission or priority areas.

CT Health Access, Hartford: $ 25,000 – This funding will support the first phase of establishing a Broker Academy to increase the number of trusted, local and culturally competent insurance brokers in Hartford, New Haven and Bridgeport. In the first phase of this work, Access Health CT will focus on outreach to community organizations to identify potential candidates for the academy, recruiting students for the brokerage academy, and recruiting brokerage agencies. to serve as mentors to students.

Connecticut Citizens Research Group, Hartford: $ 25,000 – This grant will support the Medicaid Strategy Group in their work to raise awareness of healthcare affordability issues, protect Medicaid coverage at the end of the COVID-19 public health emergency and develop an advocacy plan and campaign for 2022 based on data and stakeholder input.

Connecticut Health Policy Project, Hamden: $ 25,000 – This funding will support the Connecticut Health Policy Project’s work on its CT Health Policy Toolkit to expand capacity and understanding of health policy among state residents by enabling readers to quickly learn about health issues in as much detail as they want. It will cover topics such as Medicaid, health equity, insurance, health financing, social determinants of health and the impact of COVID-19.

Greater Bridgeport Prevention Program, Bridgeport: $ 25,000 – This funding will support the Greater Bridgeport Area Prevention Program in the creation of the Sankofa Resiliency Training Institute. The institute will build on the organization’s existing Black Men and Trauma program and offer training on topics such as historical trauma and their link to poor health outcomes; racial trauma and black men; and peer leadership. The training institute is designed to develop leaders who can bring the often under-represented perspectives of black men to discussions of racial trauma and healing in contexts such as town halls, community organizations and legislative discussions.

Meriden Record-Journal: $ 25,000 – This funding will help Record-Journal hire a health equity reporter who will take a solutions-based approach to reporting on health disparities affecting Black and Latino residents. The journalist’s work will be distributed in English and Spanish to other publications and through a local network of Latino speakers.

Connecticut Office of Health Strategy, Hartford: $ 25,000 – This funding will support technical assistance to provide advice on the financial structure and investment strategy to establish a health equity trust that would be designed to address health inequalities.

Laurel house, Stamford: $ 25,000 – This funding will support Laurel House’s efforts to improve access to mental health care for people of color in Connecticut through outreach as well as the development of additional content for the website www.rtor.org.

Interruptions: disrupting the silence, New Haven: $ 10,000 – This project aims to break down barriers to psychotherapy and long-standing distrust of behavioral health care among communities of color, using Let’s Talk, a program that facilitates conversations about trauma , mourning and healing. This funding will support the training of religious leaders, nonprofit staff, community leaders and others on the Let’s Talk model, as well as the development and evaluation of training materials.

Connecticut Council for Philanthropy, Hartford: $ 7,000 – This grant supports the Connecticut Council for Philanthropy by providing Racial Equity Institute training on the ‘Groundwater Approach,’ which emphasizes how systems and structures contribute to the racial inequity.

Connecticut Psychological Association Educational Foundation, North Haven: $ 4,800 – This grant will help the organization increase participation in its free monthly social justice lecture series, which is designed to educate behavioral health clinicians on topics such as disparities, differences of power, racism, advocacy and alliance.

The foundation also provides what it describes as “Trusted Messenger Grants” because “information is essential in a public health crisis and often the messenger is as important as the message itself.” Officials point out that “messages are much more effective when delivered from trusted sources,” noting that the foundation has been providing grants to trusted messaging organizations since 2020. Among the latest:

  • New Haven Community Action Agency, New Haven: $ 15,000

  • Cross Street Training and Academic Center, Middletown: $ 15,000

  • Grace Baptist Church, Waterbury: $ 15,000

  • Greater Bridgeport Prevention Program, Bridgeport: $ 15,000

  • Access to the New Haven project, New Haven: $ 15,000

  • The Hartford Heritage Foundation, Hartford: $ 15,000


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Obituary of Frederick Humphrey (1926 – 2022) – Hartford, CT https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/obituary-of-frederick-humphrey-1926-2022-hartford-ct/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:01:06 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/obituary-of-frederick-humphrey-1926-2022-hartford-ct/ Frederick Griswold Humphrey II (known as “Fred”), 95, died peacefully of natural causes in Brattleboro, VT on January 5, 2022. Fred was born on the family dairy farm in Canton Center, CT on October 28, 1926 , to Genevieve Stockwell Humphrey and Harold William Humphrey. Cherry Brook Farm had been home to Humphreys for eight […]]]>

Frederick Griswold Humphrey II (known as “Fred”), 95, died peacefully of natural causes in Brattleboro, VT on January 5, 2022. Fred was born on the family dairy farm in Canton Center, CT on October 28, 1926 , to Genevieve Stockwell Humphrey and Harold William Humphrey. Cherry Brook Farm had been home to Humphreys for eight generations and Fred was proud of his Yankee heritage. He had two brothers, Sam and Harold, both deceased, and two sisters, Ruth (deceased) and Lucy Wong (who lives in Killingly, Connecticut). Growing up during the Depression, Fred walked or rode his pony to a one-class school and was responsible for endless farm chores. He never forgot his rural roots. He was too young to serve in World War II but enlisted in the Air Force Cadets at the end of the war, where he trained as an electrician. Subsequently, Fred received a degree in social work from the University of Connecticut and married his girlfriend Dorothy Marie Peterson, a graduate of the Hartford School of Nursing. Fred and Dot moved often during their early years together: to Philadelphia, PA, where he received his MSW from the University of Pennsylvania; Garrison, NY, where he worked as a counselor at the local Veterans Hospital; Brattleboro, VT where he was a family counselor; back to Philadelphia, where he earned an EdD at the University of Pennsylvania; then to Storrs, Connecticut, where he was professor of child development and family relations at the University of Connecticut for 25 years, specializing in human sexuality. Along the way, Fred and Dot raised three children: Brian (formerly of Guilford, VT, now deceased), Heidi (Shaftsbury, VT) and Alan (Ventnor City, NJ and Ardmore, PA). Fred loved his job and became the president of the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. He has also developed a thriving marriage counseling practice. After retiring from UConn in 1991, Fred and Dot returned to Guilford, VT, just up the street where they had lived 35 years earlier. Fred had a lifelong love of skiing, from conquering the Head Wall at Tuckerman’s Ravine to ski patrolling in his beloved Hogback to adventure in western Utah. He continued to ski until he was 80 years old. His family shared his passion and it became the reason for many family adventures. In retirement, he became a dedicated volunteer and fundraiser for many nonprofits including the Vermont Land Trust, the Guilford Fire Department, the Guilford Historical Society and the Friends of Algiers, for which he helped raise funds to acquire and renovate the Guilford Country Store. During the 1990s he helped establish the 4th of July celebration in Guilford and often acted as master of ceremonies. He could be found on his tractor year round, mowing in the summer and plowing in the winter, and helping out on his family’s Christmas tree farm every year in Canton Center, CT. He also liked to read history, especially books about WWII. He enjoyed meeting new people and chatting. Fred is survived by his beloved children Alan and Heidi, their wives Wendy Rosen Humphrey and Ben Benedict, as well as four grandchildren: Lincoln Benedict, Ian Humphrey, Margot Benedict and Erica Humphrey, as well as their wives and partners; and her special friend Mary Sargent. He was very proud of his family and loved to chair family reunions. Three years ago he moved from his hilltop home in Guilford to Bradley House in Brattleboro, where he received kind attention and loving care. The family are very grateful to Bradley House for providing such a welcoming home in their later years. Fred’s memorial service will take place when we can safely assemble in person. Donations can be made in memory of Fred to Garden Path Elder Living (Bradley House), the Guilford, VT Historical Society, or the Dr. Frederick G. Humphrey Fellowship in Family Studies at the University of Connecticut.

Posted by Hartford Courant on January 10, 2022.


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WishBone and SpineGuard sign national distribution https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wishbone-and-spineguard-sign-national-distribution/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 21:15:37 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wishbone-and-spineguard-sign-national-distribution/ WARSAW, Ind. and BOULDER, Colorado and PARIS, France, January 6, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – WishBone Medical, Inc., a leader in pediatric orthopedic medical devices, and SpineGuard (FR0011464452 – ALSGD), an innovative company deploying its Dynamic Surgical Guidance (DSG) to secure and streamline bone implant placement, today announced a long-term collaborative partnership with, for the exclusive […]]]>

WARSAW, Ind. and BOULDER, Colorado and PARIS, France, January 6, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – WishBone Medical, Inc., a leader in pediatric orthopedic medical devices, and SpineGuard (FR0011464452 – ALSGD), an innovative company deploying its Dynamic Surgical Guidance (DSG) to secure and streamline bone implant placement, today announced a long-term collaborative partnership with, for the exclusive distribution rights of the PediGuard® Smart Spinal Drilling Devices to pediatric hospitals in across the United States.

“This strategic alignment with SpineGuard enables WishBone’s spine division to support and focus 100% on the pediatric spine community. Our goal is to provide clinical solutions to the unmet needs of surgeons related to improving patient safety and improving practice outcomes, ”said Jeff Wertz, Executive Vice President of Spine, WishBone Medical . “Increasing accuracy rates when making a pilot hole in axially rotating spines during scoliosis surgery is critical to a successful outcome. Additionally, surgical teams can dramatically reduce the amount of radiation exposure in children associated with preoperative CT scans and intraoperative x-rays taken during surgery, a significant risk factor that can be significantly reduced and minimized in AIS procedures.

“We will implement this very promising collaboration in close cooperation to integrate with our existing network of US agents, taking advantage of the new DSG Connect platform which adds visual display and data logging capabilities. Despite the evolution of today’s spine surgery solutions, the design logic inherent in the DSG continues to elevate the key elements that have kept DSG technology extremely relevant in this risk mitigation, low exposure. radiation, minimal setup, and a 12-year clinical history of providing true -time accuracy that rivals all other much more expensive modalities, ”said Patrick Pilcher, vice president of sales and marketing, SpineGuard America. North.

Pierre Jérôme, CEO and Co-Founder of SpineGuard, adds: “We are delighted to partner with WishBone to bring our X-ray-free real-time guidance technology to more US surgeons and hospitals providing pediatric orthopedic care. and help them make spine surgery safer. This congruent alliance will significantly expand our trade footprint in the United States. WishBone has the passion, leadership and access to drive faster and wider adoption of our DSG technology in spinal deformity correction, a historical foundation that is an integral part of SpineGuard.

“Thanks to the contracts WishBone has with several group purchasing organizations, we are now networked with 242 of the 268 independent children’s hospitals performing orthopedic surgery,” said Nick Deeter, Founder, President and CEO of WishBone Medical. “This level of access will provide surgeons with the ability to immediately use the DSG and minimize radiation exposure for their patients. This technology is a perfect complement to WishBone’s sterile spine solutions as we strive to raise surgical standards for children.

The safety and efficacy of using DSG for spinal surgery has been proven by more than 85,000 surgeries worldwide and supported by 17 peer-reviewed scientific publications.* DSG probes provide haptic and tactile sensation, act as an internal GPS system inside the pedicle, and enhance the ability of residents and fellows to place spinal implants more precisely for increased patient safety.1 The literature maintains that DSG accuracy rates are equal to or better than navigation / robotic alternatives, without the inconvenience of disrupting surgical workflow and avoiding intraoperative CT scans. The combination of DSG technology with the ASTRA Spine Deformation System will provide a clinical solution to help meet the growing needs of the pediatric spine surgeon community.

* A complete list of support publications is available on the manufacturer’s website: https://www.spineguard.com/dynamic-surgical-guidance-technology
1. Williams, John and Samdani, Amer and Defino, Helton and George, Keri and Gaughan, John and Betz, Randal. (2014). Anticipation of the breach of the vertebral pedicle by dynamic surgical guidance. Coluna / Columna. 13. 210-213. 10.1590 / S1808-18512014130300R85.

About SpineGuard®

Founded in 2009 in France and the USA by Pierre Jérôme and Stéphane Bette, SpineGuard is an innovative company deploying its proprietary real-time detection technology without DSG® radiation (Dynamic Surgical Guidance) to secure and rationalize the placement of implants in the skeleton . SpineGuard designs, develops and markets medical devices that have been used in more than 85,000 surgical procedures worldwide. Seventeen studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals have demonstrated the multiple benefits offered by DSG® to patients, surgeons, surgical staff and hospitals. On the strength of these solid fundamentals and several strategic partnerships, SpineGuard has extended its technological platform with a breakthrough innovation: the “intelligent” pedicle screw launched at the end of 2017 and broadens the field of applications in dental implantology and surgical robotics. DSG® was co-invented by Maurice Bourlion, Ph.D., Ciaran Bolger, MD, Ph.D., and Alain Vanquaethem, biomedical engineer. SpineGuard is engaged in several ESG initiatives. For more information visit www.spineguard.com.

Warning

SpineGuard securities may not be offered or sold in the United States because they have not been and will not be registered under the Securities Act or any securities law of the United States, and SpineGuard has not intends to make a public offering of its securities in the United States. This is an announcement and not a prospectus, and the information contained in this document does not constitute and does not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, and there will be no nor any sale of the securities referred to herein in the United States in which such an offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration or exemption from registration.

Contacts

About WishBone Medical
WishBone Medical is a global pediatric orthopedics company committed to providing anatomically appropriate implants and instruments in sterile, single-use intervention kits designed to prevent infections, reduce overall costs to clients, and achieve the best results. best results for children around the world. The WishBone Medical family of companies offers a comprehensive product line of “head to toe” innovative systems with operations in Warsaw, IN; Istanbul and Singapore. For more information, visit www.WishBoneMedical.com or contact Kaitlyn Hughes, Director of Marketing and Communications, at + 1-574-306-4006.

Contact:
Kaitlyn hughes
Phone. : + 1-574-306-4006
KHughes@WishBoneMedical.com
www.WishBoneMedical.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/ed3cdf7f-e7cc-4017-b8f6-92e98883356b


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A new year offers opportunities to make a difference in your community: https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-new-year-offers-opportunities-to-make-a-difference-in-your-community/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 21:55:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/a-new-year-offers-opportunities-to-make-a-difference-in-your-community/ PARMA, Ohio – The new year is a time to come away with a new slate. Many people make resolutions, some of which can be difficult to keep. Why not consider something useful that will help a local group? One such opportunity is the historic Stearns Homestead in Parma, the last working farm in town […]]]>

PARMA, Ohio – The new year is a time to come away with a new slate. Many people make resolutions, some of which can be difficult to keep.

Why not consider something useful that will help a local group? One such opportunity is the historic Stearns Homestead in Parma, the last working farm in town and home to many animals. It is also the site of two historic houses. The farm offers tours and opportunities for people to learn about animals and farm operations. Visitors come from across the South West region and beyond to experience the property and its assets.

Even if volunteering to work on the farm isn’t your thing, there are opportunities to make a difference and help the homestead – owned by the city and managed by the Parma Area Historical Society – remains a valuable asset to the community.

One easy way is to purchase items from the property’s “wish list”. The list includes animal feed and care, which means purchasing the following feeds:

Plain cheerios / generic O’s cereals

Leaf lettuce and other green vegetables

Canned pumpkin (no pie mix)

Cat food (box or dry)

Apples (except Granny Smith)

Empty egg cartons (size of a dozen)

Buy stream

Donations can also be made on behalf of the Parma Area Historical Society / Stearns Homestead to the Grace Brothers in North Royalton. Donations will be used directly to cover food costs.

The following items are still needed:

· Straw

Pet bedding packs

Canned and dry cat food

Small rubber or metal bowls that won’t tip over or heavy feeding dishes

Cloth napkins

· Paper napkins

Cleaning cloths

Individually wrapped hand warmers (for our volunteers and on-farm cats)

The Historical Society of the Parma Region provides food and care for all farm animals and maintains the farm through the sale of animal feed, animal “adoptions”, items purchased from the store campaign and donations from farm friends. There is also an Amazon Wish List on the Facebook page. Use “AmazonSmile” to add donations to the property.

The farm, which is closed for the winter, is located at 6975 Ridge Road, Parma. Visit stearnshomestead.com or the Facebook page for more information.

Gift of life: Another opportunity to help others in the New Year is to donate blood. There is a serious shortage right now.

Independence will be hosting a Red Cross blood drive from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on January 10 in the Red Oak Room at the Independence Civic Center, 6363 Selig Drive, Independence.

Appointments are highly recommended. Visit redcrossblood.org or call 800-733-2767 to make an appointment or for more information.

Donors must be at least 17 years old (16 with parental permission), meet height and weight requirements (at least 110 pounds based on height), and be in good general health.

Donors should bring their Red Cross blood donor card or other identification.

Help others: Another opportunity is to join a nonprofit community service organization to help give back to the community. One such group is the Kiwanis Club, an international organization of volunteers dedicated to making the world a better place, one child at a time. Many communities, including Parma and Independence, have clubs.

The Independence Kiwanis Club meets at 6 p.m. on the second and fourth Monday of the month at the Independence Civic Center, 6363 Selig Drive, Independence. The club is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year and had planned a celebration on January 14. Unfortunately, rising COVID-19 rates forced the event to be canceled.

Some of the group’s activities include Santa’s delivery service, pancake breakfasts, Easter egg hunt, fishing tournament, fall chicken barbecue, participation in the annual Home Days celebration of the city, the treasure hunt, the golf outing, garage sales (the next one is scheduled for April 2). , a flag contest and more. They also sponsor a Builders Club at Independence Middle School.

The club’s mailing address is Kiwanis Club of Independence, 8208 Hillside, Independence, Ohio 44131

The Parma Area Kiwanis Club meets at 7.15am on the first Wednesday of the month at the Pappou Café Restaurant, 8320 Snow Road, Parma.

If breakfast is not suitable, the club invites potential members to join them for lunch at noon on the third Wednesday, also at Pappou’s.

Some of the events the club participates in include Halloween Trunk or Treat and the annual Christmas Parade. The group also sponsors key clubs in high schools in the region.

For more information visit parmaareakiwanis.org, call 440-882-2012 or email bob@fourstarinsurance.com.

History buffs: If you enjoy preserving local history, consider learning more about the community’s historical society.

In Brooklyn, the Historical Society Museum is located at 4442 Ridge Road, Brooklyn. Regular hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, by appointment at other times. The museum is closed on public holiday weekends. The library – which is not a lending library – is accessible only by appointment.

Historical Society meetings are normally held at 7:00 p.m. on the last Wednesday of the month in March, April, May, June, September, and October.

Organizations and groups are encouraged to plan visits to the museum. Call 216-749-2804 during business hours for special events, meeting dates and tour planning. If there is no response, call one of the numbers suggested on the recording or send an email message to groundhogsgarden@wowway.com.

Information, please: Readers are encouraged to share information about themselves, their families and friends, organizations, religious events, etc. in Brooklyn, Independence, Parma, Parma Heights and Seven Hills for the Sun Postings column, which I write as a freelance writer. Awards, distinctions, milestone anniversaries or anniversaries and other items are welcome. Submit information at least 10 days before the requested publication date to carolkovach@hotmail.com.

Read more of the Parma Sun Post.


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New studies suggest omicron is a less virulent strain https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/new-studies-suggest-omicron-is-a-less-virulent-strain/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 21:48:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/new-studies-suggest-omicron-is-a-less-virulent-strain/ Year-over-year data comparison from December 31, 2021 to the same date 2020 of the number of COVID-19 cases statewide. With COVID-19 hospitalizations continuing to increase at an alarming rate across North Carolina, reminders remain the most important thing you can do to keep yourself and your loved ones out of hospital, according to officials from […]]]>

Year-over-year data comparison from December 31, 2021 to the same date 2020 of the number of COVID-19 cases statewide.

With COVID-19 hospitalizations continuing to increase at an alarming rate across North Carolina, reminders remain the most important thing you can do to keep yourself and your loved ones out of hospital, according to officials from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. noted last week.

Hospitalizations of COVID cases in North Carolina have increased to levels never seen before in its entirety for the pandemic, and sadly, we are not alone. In the past seven days, North Carolina has reported 67,913 new cases of the virus. Compare that with the previous seven day average of 29,701 new cases and the numbers speak for themselves.

For Surry County, in the past 14 days, 798 new cases of the virus have been reported and 440 in the past seven days. Overnight 93 new cases were reported, if that number were to hold up that would mean 651 new cases next week.

The trend is not unique to North Carolina, as the country twice broke its record for daily COVID cases last week, according to data from the New York Times. As of Thursday alone, the United States recorded more than 580,000 new cases of COVID. However, in the past two weeks, as the number of COVID cases in the United States has increased by 181% and the number of hospitalizations has increased by 19%, the number of deaths has decreased by 5%.

“Now is the time to get your booster shot,” said Kody H. Kinsley, Deputy Chief Health Secretary and DHHS incoming secretary. “We have a lot of vaccines around, and getting a booster, or getting the shot if you haven’t already, dramatically lowers your risk of serious illness and hospitalization from the Omicron variant.” Vaccines are available free of charge to anyone aged 5 and over from county health departments, your doctor, and county pharmacy chains.

The NCDHHS also adopted revised guidelines from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, which outline what individuals should do if they contract or are exposed to COVID to help slow the spread to others. What has not changed is that if you have symptoms, regardless of your vaccination status, you need to get tested and isolate yourself from others while you wait for a result.

Not all of today’s COVID news is bad news, as more studies of the omicron variant are published which now suggest that omicron, “is doing its own thing in many ways,” according to Ravindra Gupta, a researcher on viral variants at the University of Cambridge, and author of one of the studies. “The biology of the virus is not the same as before. It’s almost a novelty.

These published studies included lab tests that found that the omicron variant produced less damaging infections to the lungs and instead limited its damage to the nose, throat, and windpipe.

“It seems to be less virulent,” said Dr Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. “We seem to have so much more immunity in December 2021” than in previous waves.

Now is not the time for anyone to let their guard down, simply because omicron may not be as deadly as previous variants. Justin Lessler, professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina, said: “With Omicron our flare-ups are so big, even though they are on average… much less severe than the previous variants, the number of cases is so high. that hospital systems are going to be overwhelmed and there are risks to individuals as it is so likely that you will be infected. “

Overcrowding in hospitals and pressure on scarce medical resources have been a concern since the start of the pandemic. Memories of tired nurses reusing the same mask for a month while people at home made masks out of t-shirts and handkerchiefs weren’t long gone. Everyone has the power to prevent this from happening again and can alleviate some of the pressure on local health workers and public health officials by following the guidelines.

The Surry County Health and Nutrition Center has sent the following reminder that if you cannot be tested, follow the instructions below as if you tested positive.

If you are exposed to someone with COVID-19 and you are:

• Unvaccinated – stay away from others for 5 days, get tested on the 5th day after exposure, and if your test is negative, resume normal activities while wearing a mask for an additional 5 days.

• Vaccinated and eligible for a booster, but not yet boosted – stay away from others for 5 days, get tested on the 5th day after exposure, and if your test is negative, resume normal activities while wearing a mask for an additional 5 days.

• Vaccinated and received your booster or not yet eligible for a booster – you don’t need to stay away from others, but you must wear a mask for 10 days.

If your test is positive, regardless of your vaccination status, and:

• Do not have any symptoms – isolate yourself from others for 5 days, then wear a mask for an additional 5 days when you resume your normal activities.

• Show symptoms – isolate yourself from others until you have no fever for 24 hours and your symptoms improve. You should self-isolate for at least 5 days from the onset of your symptoms. Once you stop isolating yourself, you must wear a mask for an additional 5 days.

People who received two doses of Pfizer or Moderna vaccines are eligible for a booster after 6 months, and those who initially received a single dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine should be boosted after 2 months.

According to the CDC, those who are eligible for the boosters and have not received them should follow the more stringent guidelines for quarantine and masks.

The CDC guidelines cites initial data from South Africa showing that two doses of mRNA offer 35 percent protection against infection. With a recall, this drops to 75 percent.

The CDC recommends a properly fitted mask and, if possible, people are encouraged to wear a surgical or procedural mask, KN95 or N95 respirator. In general, the CDC recommends that all unvaccinated people 2 years of age or older wear a mask indoors.

The Surry County Health and Nutrition Center will offer vaccines and booster doses Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call 336-401-8400 to make an appointment, but visits without appointments will be accepted.

The CDC, NCDHSS, and Surry County Health and Nutrition Center are asking you not to go to the emergency room to get tested. The golden rule of COVID remains: if you are not feeling well, err on the side of caution for the protection of your loved ones and neighbors and stay home.

For more information on COVID-19 vaccines, testing and counseling, please call the Surry County Health and Nutrition Center or visit www.facebook.com/SurryCountyHealthandNutritionCenter


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[OPINION] On history, lost time and ‘Nadine Luster’ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/opinion-on-history-lost-time-and-nadine-luster/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 04:51:52 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/opinion-on-history-lost-time-and-nadine-luster/ A few days ago, a certain Twitter user, allegedly Nadine Luster, tweeted that although she had learned a lot in school, she thought six years of “repeated history” was a “waste of time”. She further tweeted that it was about the characteristic of having the same topic for six years and that the only thing […]]]>

A few days ago, a certain Twitter user, allegedly Nadine Luster, tweeted that although she had learned a lot in school, she thought six years of “repeated history” was a “waste of time”. She further tweeted that it was about the characteristic of having the same topic for six years and that the only thing that had changed was the branding of the books. She later added that this repetitive topic makes it counterproductive and called for effective and efficient history teaching.

These series of tweets have elicited mixed reactions from Internet users, especially teachers. Some accused her of being stupid because there was no “repeated history” due to the spiraling nature of the Filipino basic social science curriculum. Some even took it as a manifestation of Filipino academics’ problem with the emergence of historical distortion (not revisionism, as some would say) and fake news. Even the National 50th Anniversary Committee, in a now-deleted Facebook post, invited her to their page to learn more about the pre-colonial history of the Philippines and thanked her for making them aware of the need to popularize more. the story.

As a teacher and graduate student, I personally understand where she comes from. Apparently his frustration also stems from what is happening now, where historical distortions and fake news are rampant. So, one might really think that studying history for six years is just a waste of time. It is as if the Filipinos had learned nothing at all about their past. Sometimes I also have this kind of frustrations, which sometimes make me wonder if I am really up to the professional vocation I have chosen.

However, one must also understand the implicit issues that his tweet revealed. Perhaps for some learners, history lessons are a ‘waste of time’ due to (1) some problems in the curriculum and teaching strategies of history teaching in the Philippines, (2 ) the inaccessibility of some important primary sources for history lessons in the Philippines; and (3) the issue of trivialization when discussing Philippine history both in classrooms and in public discourse. It should also be added that these problems, however, are not new: historians like the late National Scientist Teodoro Agoncillo already stated 60 years ago. Unfortunately, these problems persist in the Philippine education sector, whether public or private, basic or higher.

Curriculum and educational blues

Curricular and pedagogical problems can be at the origin of this negative impression of history lessons. In the usual Filipino school experience, one could say that history lessons are boring and dreaded because instructors resort to rigid memorization of people and places, dates and events that are irrelevant to the subject. own life of students. Some students even share that their teachers, instead of discussing the lesson, instead assign topics for students to bring back to class without addressing them afterwards. Others also note that their history teachers don’t teach and instead let them watch movies until the end of the school year or semester. These anecdotal experiences may traumatize some learners, making them hateful or disinterested in the subject by the time they leave school.

To this problem is also added the question of the qualifications of the instructors who deal with this kind of subject. Some educators would say that some schools, both at the elementary and college level, allocate history classes to those who are not specialized in their teaching, due to the lack of social science graduates capable of dealing with the subject. Some would even say that the curriculum for the Baccalaureate in secondary education, majoring in human sciences, does not offer future social science teachers sufficient knowledge in historiography and research in the social sciences. Likewise, skills and knowledge in historical research and analysis are not included in their professional development training, especially before the start of the school year.

Others criticize the curriculum prescribed by the Ministry of Education as insufficient for students. Some social science teachers criticize the removal of Philippine history from the K-12 junior high school curriculum and its integration into other high school social science courses as insufficient. For them, this can lead some students to believe false rumors and distorted historical facts. They also argue that some important topics in Philippine history, such as the rule of martial law, the effects of colonialism and the marginalization of indigenous peoples, would be left out and therefore likely to be repeated. Therefore, organizations such as the High School Philippine History Movement and the Philippine Historical Association campaigned for the return of Philippine history to junior high school. The HSPHM, in particular, began as a signature campaign in Change.Org, led by educator Jamaico Ignacio.

Inaccessibility of reliable and precise historical sources

Another problem with history teaching in the Philippines that merits discussion is the lack of access to major important historical sources. This is important because the ability of educators and the public to access historical documents can help them gain a better understanding of history directly from primary sources. However, this is not the case in the Philippines: most, if not all teachers, do not have access to primary sources, nor the ability to research with them. Besides the usual language barrier problem (in the case of documents written in Spanish, Japanese or pre-colonial script), this was also caused by the control of certain sectors of Philippine history and culture, for bureaucratic, institutional and sometimes personal reasons.

In addition, most, if not all archival material in the Philippines remains undigitalized and inaccessible to Internet users due to lack of resources and manpower. Despite the passage of the National Archives of the Philippines Act 2007 (Republic Act No. 9470), some institutions, both public and private, do not have a systematic archiving system, which makes some documents unavailable or, unfortunately, lost in time. It is unfortunate that Filipino records are easier to obtain abroad through foreign websites (for example, the Portal de Archivos Españoles or PARES in Spain, and the National Archives and Records Administration in the United States) than on our own ribs.

The problem of precise and reliable sources is not confined to archival documents either. Despite DepEd’s assurances regarding the quality control of teaching materials, textbooks with erroneous information still reach the classroom. These materials, which are used by students across the country, can give learners misinformation. Some schools even use books from the martial law era while in the 21st century! Additionally, some textbooks in the Philippines lack good aesthetics (i.e. grayscale colors, use of caricatures), which does not help learners to effectively visualize past events. .

[OPINION]    Account with the Marcos

The trivialization of the history of the Philippines

Last but not least of these issues is the seemingly trivialized approach to discussing Philippine history in both academic and public settings. This problem, although seen more on social media pages, is also evident in the classroom. This happens when a historical event or a personality is presented through meaningless anecdotes and instruments of entertainment. This also happens through the emphasis on nicknames and titles of individuals or events instead of their actual essence or heritage (negative or positive) to society.

Instead of helping people see the relevance of the story in their daily lives, it makes the story feel like a bunch of trivial facts. History is thus reduced to its entertainment value, instead of being an instrument of meaningful reflection. Therefore, we have misconceptions about the role history plays in our personal and social lives.

[OPINION]    On the Filipino's obsession with patriotism and heroism

Objective: to make history alive and usable!

So what then is the solution to this predicament? As Agoncillo wrote decades ago, educators and historians should bring history to life in the classroom. Instead of forcing learners to simply memorize facts, history lessons should invite them to visualize past events as if they were there. Instead of forcing them to relate, learners should be given stories that demystify the events, and they should be delivered barkada style. kuwentuhan or the tsismisan of your Marites neighborhood.

Most importantly, discussions of Philippine history, whether in the academic or public sphere, should always answer the question “So what?” »Or find his say say (relevance or meaning) in our lives, helping us to reflect on our past, present and future as individuals and as a nation. It would turn the story from a simple narrative into a usable past, as Renato Constantino would say. However, this will only become possible if institutional interventions are made for educators. Sufficient, inclusive and empowering training, accessible historical documents and mentoring should be made available for our teachers to be qualified to deal with these topics.

And yes, the story has to be an enjoyable subject, like a good Netflix movie or a good K drama series! – Rappler.com

Michael Anjielo Tabuyan is a high school teacher at St. Scholastica’s College, Manila, and received his MA in Philippine Studies, specializing in Sociocultural Studies, at the Asian Center, University of the Philippines. A graduate in political science, he has taught humanities and social sciences at both college and basic education level.



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As the Kremlin revises history, a human rights champion becomes a victim https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/as-the-kremlin-revises-history-a-human-rights-champion-becomes-a-victim/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:17:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/as-the-kremlin-revises-history-a-human-rights-champion-becomes-a-victim/ MOSCOW – In 1990, the year before his death, Zipporah Rosenblatt Kahana first spoke publicly about his imprisonment in Russian labor camps 50 years earlier. She did heavy labor and worked as a seamstress, but the conditions were so severe that she lost her left eye. Her husband was executed as an enemy of the […]]]>

MOSCOW – In 1990, the year before his death, Zipporah Rosenblatt Kahana first spoke publicly about his imprisonment in Russian labor camps 50 years earlier. She did heavy labor and worked as a seamstress, but the conditions were so severe that she lost her left eye. Her husband was executed as an enemy of the state. Her “crime” was to be married to him.

His account came as testimony at Memorial International, then a newly formed human rights organization chronicling political repression in the Soviet Union.

“For a long time after her release, she felt that it was kind of a dark side of her past that no one needed to know about,” said her great-grandson Nikolai Dykhne. Memorial’s work to collect information about the labor camps, or gulag system, gave him “the courage to finally tell his story fully,” he said.

Memorial has become the country’s most important human rights organization and the emblem of a nascent democratic movement in post-Soviet Russia. But today, its records of traumatic events and victims of persecution make the Kremlin uncomfortable. The country’s Supreme Court issued a ruling on Tuesday to shut down Memorial International, the parent organization, and on Wednesday it also ordered the closure of the Memorial Human Rights Center.

Memorial denounced the two verdicts as political and pledged to appeal and find legal avenues to continue its work with its 60 affiliated organizations across the country.

The measures taken against Memorial, critics say, are emblematic of how President Vladimir V. Putin attempted to whitewash Russia’s Soviet history and reframe the modern image of those decades – in a manner similar to pressure from Chinese President Xi Jinping to downplay traumatic parts of his country’s communist history, such as famine and political purges.

This week’s court rulings sparked outrage from activists and dissidents, as well as condemnation from the United States and the European Union.

But the most poignant reactions came from Russians, like Mr. Dykhne, whose families have been touched by Memorial’s work.

Co-founded by Andrei D. Sakharov, Nobel Peace Prize laureate, and recorded by former President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, another winner of this prize, Memorial was born out of a popular movement to erect a monument to commemorate the victims of Joseph Stalin’s machine of terror. It quickly spread beyond its original cause.

In 1989, candles in hand, Memorial members and their supporters surrounded the KGB headquarters in central Moscow, a protest that would have been unthinkable a few years earlier. It seemed like a sign that times were changing.

This week’s verdicts have proven that the changes are not irrevocable, said Svetlana Gannushkina, memorial board member and one of Russia’s most renowned human rights defenders, who was part of the chain. demonstrators.

Ms Gannushkina remembered the security guards who hid in the giant fortress-like building in Lyubyanka Square. “They didn’t feel comfortable at the time,” she recalls. “But today they feel very comfortable, they are in power.”

Under Memorial’s auspices, Ms. Gannushkina set up a program to help migrants, refugees and internally displaced people. Today, she works with a team of 55 lawyers across Russia who help up to 5,000 people each year. Some remained stateless for up to 20 years, until Memorial lawyers helped them, she said.

“We’re not doing anything other than making sure the state respects its laws,” said Ms. Gannushkina, who was nominated for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize.

In addition to the migration program, Memorial representatives worked in all the major conflict zones of the former Soviet Union and Russia. It was the last independent human rights organization to leave Chechnya. It is one of the few organizations actively working in Central Asia.

In Moscow and St. Petersburg, Memorial helped install monuments to victims of Stalinist crimes. The Moscow Monument, a rock brought from one of the first Soviet prison camps, stands in front of the KGB headquarters. Every year at the end of October, thousands of people line up at a microphone to read the names of victims of political persecution.

Today, Memorial includes more than 50 organizations in Russia and six in Ukraine as well as chapters in Germany, France, Italy and other countries, engaged in historical research and human rights work.

Recently, younger generations of Russians have taken an interest in Memorial’s work. 40-year-old Ksenia Kazantseva said Memorial helped her discover what her great-grandfather looked like.

The great-grandfather, Mikhail N. Malama, was a former collaborator of Tsar Nicholas II, she said. He was arrested in 1937 and charged with conspiracy to commit a terrorist act.

What happened to her next was a family mystery for decades. In 2019, however, Ms Kazantseva discovered her name in Memorial’s database, which contains more than three million files. Memorial representatives helped her submit a request with the Archives, which eventually sent her a package. It contained the photo of Mr. Malama. For the first time, Ms. Kazantseva was able to see his face.

“It was a very special feeling to see a person for the first time and to realize that they look like your relative,” said Ms. Kazantseva, a freelance songwriter.

“The memorial preserves the memory of what happened in our country, if you erase it then everything can be rewritten,” Ms. Kazantseva said.

While the government recognizes the trauma of the Stalinist era, it is also trying to stimulate patriotism among Russians. The centerpiece of it celebrates Russia’s contributions to WWII and the defeat of the Nazis, which laid the foundation for the Soviet Union as a world power.

Some Russians find Stalin’s iron-fisted rule appealing in a world full of chaos and uncertainty. In a 2019 poll conducted by the independent Levada Center, 70% of those polled believed that Stalin had played an “entirely” or “mostly positive” role in Russian history, the highest since Levada began posing the question in 2003.

Stalin was the leader of the Soviet Union at the time, which is why, in the eyes of the Kremlin, his image should not be completely tarnished, said Aleksandr Baunov, editor-in-chief of the Carnegie Moscow Center website.

Mr. Baunov drew a comparison between the closing of Memorial and the actions of the Chinese Communist Party as he rewrites his history under Mr. Xi.

“This is a real shift towards a Chinese attitude towards history,” he said, describing the approach as “’Yes, there have been individual mistakes, there have been casualties. including unjustified sacrifices, but it was all for the greatness of the country, ”he said. », Said Mr Baunov.

Xi used the Soviet Union as a warning to China, saying it had collapsed because its leaders had failed to quell “historical nihilism,” referring to critical accounts of political persecution or attempts to chronicle government mistakes that have led citizens to lose faith in communism.

Mr Dykhne, who at 24 does not remember any Russian leader other than Mr Putin, said the Gulag system was never discussed at his school in Moscow. He said what he learned about the Soviet dissident movement and his family history came from his elders.

In November, after prosecutors announced their investigation into Memorial, he donated his great-grandmother’s complete personal records to the organization and hopes they can find a way to preserve them.

Mr Dykhne, who works as a sculptor, said his experience weighs on him as he assesses events in Russia today. He said his family background made it difficult for him to trust Russian authorities.

“A lot of people are now losing hope for some sort of normal future in this country,” he said.

But he also said the brutality of the Soviet state had made him painfully aware of the consequences of dissent. He mentioned the brutal crackdown on protesters in January this year after dissident Aleksei A. Navalny returned from Germany, where he was recovering from what doctors called Russian-made nerve agent poisoning, and said then was sent to a penal colony. The protests that followed were large-scale and spread across the country, but they were violently suppressed, with thousands of arrests.

“If, a year ago, someone could have believed in all kinds of street protests, the authorities have already shown us what it leads to,” he said. “I don’t see any solution.

“They are trying to erase our memory,” he said. “There is a feeling that they are somehow trying to paint what happened then, so we can’t compare it with what is happening now.”

Alina Lobzina contributed reporting.


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How Indian liberalism helped the rise of the right – OpEd – Eurasia Review https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/how-indian-liberalism-helped-the-rise-of-the-right-oped-eurasia-review/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 00:40:11 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/how-indian-liberalism-helped-the-rise-of-the-right-oped-eurasia-review/ The Indian liberal front is wading through the deep waters of confusion and inaction. The rapid rise of the right-wing Bharatiya Janata (BJP) party caught him off guard, creating a political moment characterized by what an editorial in the “Krisis” newspaper called “the feeling of being caught in a wave, heading to a dangerous place, […]]]>

The Indian liberal front is wading through the deep waters of confusion and inaction. The rapid rise of the right-wing Bharatiya Janata (BJP) party caught him off guard, creating a political moment characterized by what an editorial in the “Krisis” newspaper called “the feeling of being caught in a wave, heading to a dangerous place, but feeling unable to change direction. An important feature of this “image of citizens caught in a right-wing wave” is that it includes “those it pushes back but unable to find anchor points for resistance or to imagine viable alternatives. ”What explains the failure to build a strong counter-narrative? In India, the liberal political class – instead of adapting to changing realities – resigned himself to his tradition of blissful righteousness, unwilling to understand the value of his electoral bromides.

The volatile changes in politico-historical tectonic plates in India make it clear that the far right has emerged from the bosom of a flawed liberal ideology that has slowly become antithetical to the interests of the people. In response to the imperialist depredations of the British Empire, a sustained anti-colonial struggle was launched which – to gain some effectiveness – had to foster mass participation and which in turn required some degree of accommodation of alternative perspectives. Thus, mainstream Indian nationalism developed a relatively unifying and subordinate mainstream – although it was held in check by a congressional leadership made up of high-caste and middle-class professionals with important properties and commercial clout.

From the dynamic interplay between the overflowing energy of a genuinely popular movement and the calibrating control exercised by a conservative domestic elite, modern pathologies of communitarianism are born. As the oppressed sectors of the independence movement pushed forward a largely socialist and secular agenda, the bourgeois nationalist establishment weakened the power of these programmatic horizons by decoupling politics from economics. Secularism was thus emptied of its radical message of civil equality of individuals and faithfully different communities.

What was the need for this ideological operation? Aijaz Ahmad writes:

“The idea of ​​a kind of equality leads, necessarily and logically, to other ideas of equality: the idea of ​​secularism leads to ideas of political democracy; the idea of ​​political equality leads to the idea of ​​economic equality; the idea of ​​socio-economic equality between men leads to similar ideas about equality between men and women, between individuals of one caste and another, of a race or a nation and on the other hand … ideas of equality in one area necessarily lead to ideas of equality in other areas; that the logic of such ideas would take us – and should take us – well beyond the conventional limits of democracy, socialism or secularism; that the logic of secularism, the logic of democracy would lead us, step by step, to communism itself ”.

After disobedience to secularism, there remained only the timid notion of tolerance – castigated by KN Panikkar as a “dubious” alternative to secularism. In his own words: “Tolerance is suffering or endurance and can even turn into tyranny, when exercised by a religious majority. The Hindutva’s “tolerance”, for example, grants non-Hindus a subordinate position, devoid of rights and privileges. The practical failures of this strategy of tolerance were evident in the bloody partition of the subcontinent that accompanied the transition to independence.

In the years immediately following partition, then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru contained these communal explosions by forging a social contract dominated by modernist developmentism. Economic planning and sovereignty, the provision of some basic services to the poor and illiterate, the principle of affirmative action for Dalits and agricultural subsidies were accepted as standard tariffs. However, effective implementation was lacking. Tanika Sarkar comments: “Most of these policies have remained only on paper, while the poor have continued to live their lives without the protection of any safety net. Nonetheless, the tenacity of certain principles has opened a space for the challenge of poverty and class exploitation. Rights and equality have been given the status of absolute goods, desirable standards.

Although the normative consensus around the need to eradicate poverty has been politically progressive, the cultural domain has not been integrated into this framework. A civilizational discourse of multiculturalism – built on the myth of an enduring Indian nation from Vedic times to modern times – inadvertently promoted Hindu religiosity and symbolism. Through her inclusive notion of “unity in diversity”, Nehru constructed the contours of what Anna Guttman called “nationalist classicism”. It is worth quoting it at length:

“Nationalist classicism, however, is opposed to the discourse of colonial classicization, in that it seeks to conceive of ancient civilizations as living rather than dead, by emphasizing the link between the ancient and contemporary inhabitants of the earth … this This claim is double-edged: the proximity of the ancients and the modern Hinduism could show just as convincingly the backwardness of the modern form as the enlightened nature of the ancient. Resorting to classicism can also lead to a distortion of history that favors certain types of identity. In India, the consequences of this situation are particularly problematic. Although Nehru rejects the British periodization of Indian history and its creation of separate Hindu and Muslim eras, there is no doubt that he is particularly interested in ancient India. The classical period excludes not only Indian Muslims per se, but Islam itself and, by extension, their entire way of life. Any insistence on the continuity between the Indus Valley civilization and contemporary South Asia inevitably made non-Hindus uncomfortable. “

Thus, Nehru – in his efforts to highlight the achievements of the colonized people in response to the ideological violence unleashed by the British rulers – adopted a rather static view of Indian history, frequently allowing culture to permeate the entire arena of the country’s history. It had to do with the need he felt to build a strong nation. Pritam Singh notes:

“Nehru was not a believer… but his almost romantic notion of the unity of India from time immemorial meant that he equated religion with nation. In his very famous book “The Discovery of India”, Nehru writes: “Hinduism has become the symbol of nationalism. It was indeed a national religion, with all those deep, racial and cultural instincts which form the basis of nationalism everywhere today ”. He has held conflicting positions on the Hindu institution of caste, praising it as a great historical institution at one point and viewing it as outdated at another point, while avoiding the subject of untouchability. Nehru’s Hindu bias was not per se religious, but was closely related to his passion for building a strong and united India with a highly centralized power structure.

Although Nehru harbored Hindu assumptions, these strands of his thinking were marginal due to the overwhelming influence exerted by political society. It was not until Nehruvian’s time that the Indian state exercised an educational and ethical function, trying to disseminate modern and progressive values ​​evident in the new textbooks of the time. This ability of the Indian state to transcend the divisions of civil society and propagate the figure of the abstract universal citizen has proven to be phenomenal. This was to happen because the harsh realities of civil society constitutively shape the texture of the state, which derives its contingent legitimacy from internal movements of civil society.

From the 1980s, the Congress Party began to abandon the post-colonial ethic of sovereignty and secularism in favor of a more openly communal politics. Themes of aggressive national unity – resulting from the unrest in the states of Assam, Kashmir and Punjab – were regularly brought out and given religious form by the insistence that unity could not be maintained only by Hindus. The 1984 general elections, held after the assassination of Indira Gandhi, were won thanks to the backlash of Hindu chauvinism cultivated in different regions. When this focus on specific identities combined with the impoverishing effects of neoliberalism, the fortunes of liberalism declined drastically.

While the right used its network of overlapping fronts and tight-knit cadre organizations to provide its support base with a sense of political belonging and social cohesion, the liberal camp stuck to its haphazard way of politics. . The opportunist deployment of religious themes could not compete with the systematic communitarianism of the right. The hypocritical adherence to the precepts of democracy seemed argumentatively inferior to the concrete claims of exclusionary glory offered by the neo-fascists. In short, the incomplete political prioritization by Congress of the conservative ideological elements of the anti-colonial struggle has been fully echoed by the Indian right. Today, we must honestly recognize this dimension of the current political crisis so that the battle for democracy and secularism can be rejuvenated.


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