Historical Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 15:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Historical Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Some of Record’s archives will be available online | New https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/some-of-records-archives-will-be-available-online-new/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/some-of-records-archives-will-be-available-online-new/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/some-of-records-archives-will-be-available-online-new/ The Library of Virginia, in cooperation with the Greene County File and the Greene County Historical Society, is making progress in converting microfilm records from previous editions into a searchable online database. To date, no such digital collection exists for the newspaper which has served the Greene County community for over 110 years. Many decades […]]]>

The Library of Virginia, in cooperation with the Greene County File and the Greene County Historical Society, is making progress in converting microfilm records from previous editions into a searchable online database. To date, no such digital collection exists for the newspaper which has served the Greene County community for over 110 years. Many decades of archived documents exist only in the Save office, and some years only exist on microfilm at the local office or Library of Virginia. If anything were to happen to these crumbling books and pages, the history of the county would be irretrievably lost, but this effort hopes to change that.






The Greene County File has changed over the years, but it remains the only source of local paper-based information in the county.


Microfilm recordings of earlier editions date from 1903 to the present day. The first batch of records to be processed will be the oldest available until 1964. Although work will begin next week, it is unlikely that the process on this first batch will be completed before January 2022.

When the editions are available, they will be posted on the website of The Chronicle of Virginia (https://virginiachronicle.com). It is a historical archive of Virginia newspapers, providing free access to full-text search and scanned images of over one million newspaper pages. The ability to perform a full-text search of past issues will greatly assist the Historical Society and the public in their efforts to document the history of our county.

“Preserving our newspaper archives is the most important project I have undertaken since becoming editor in August 2018,” said Terry Beigie, who before becoming editor , was a part-time journalist for the weekly. “The goal has been to digitize our collection into a searchable online database and preserve the history of Greene County, at least since the early 1900s. Our journal is the first and only journal published specifically in Greene County.


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members honored at the annual meeting of the Bradford County Historical Society | Arts and life https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/members-honored-at-the-annual-meeting-of-the-bradford-county-historical-society-arts-and-life/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/members-honored-at-the-annual-meeting-of-the-bradford-county-historical-society-arts-and-life/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/members-honored-at-the-annual-meeting-of-the-bradford-county-historical-society-arts-and-life/ At the Bradford County Historical Society Annual Meeting on October 4, 2021, Society President Henry G. Farley opened the program by introducing the Society’s Trustees: Buddy Crockett, Athens Township; Wm. Alan Shaw, Towanda; Mary Skills, Wyalusing; Janet R. Ordway, Troy; Joyce M. Marr, Lake Wesauking; Joseph D. Jones, Stevensville; Steven Benjamin, Durrell; Sue Roy, Wysox; […]]]>

At the Bradford County Historical Society Annual Meeting on October 4, 2021, Society President Henry G. Farley opened the program by introducing the Society’s Trustees: Buddy Crockett, Athens Township; Wm. Alan Shaw, Towanda; Mary Skills, Wyalusing; Janet R. Ordway, Troy; Joyce M. Marr, Lake Wesauking; Joseph D. Jones, Stevensville; Steven Benjamin, Durrell; Sue Roy, Wysox; Margaret Walsh, Bentley Creek; J. Kelsey Jones, Township of Wells; and Rita Carey, Camptown. He then introduced Matthew Carl, executive director of the company and Denise Golden, library clerk. It further recognized the Company’s Director Emeritus, James E. Parks.

Society volunteers were featured: Cindy Brown, Tom and Ann Carl, Kay Fulmer, Lois Ball Martin, Janice Otis, Diane Pelton and Sue Roy. The volunteers who completed 50 hours or more this year were: Diane Pelton, Janice Otis and Cindy Brown.

The 2020 meeting minutes were approved, and Farley was once again appointed editor-in-chief of The Settler, the company’s quarterly publication.

Margaret Walsh, Chair of the Nominating Committee, introduced the names of Janet Ordway, Troy; Mary Skilling, Wyalusing; Buddy Crockett, Canton of Athens; and Wm. Alan Shaw, Towanda for re-election as directors for a three-year term expiring in 2024. They were approved unanimously.

While Walsh was on the podium, Farley took the opportunity to recognize her on her 25th anniversary as a director. This happened in 2020, but due to the Covid shutdown, that honor has been reserved for 2021.

In the Executive Director’s report, Carl reviewed operations to include facility improvements, live streaming of event capacity, credit card processing equipment, new lettering on doors and office furniture donated to the company by TREHAB from the old C&N building.

Programming and Community Outreach: Friday Night at the Museum was produced online in 2020 and the company returned to on-site programming in July 2021.

The Century Farm Historic Marker was installed on May 1 after a five-year wait. Carl has spoken outside for groups now that pandemic regulations are not as strict. The company participated in Barclay Mountain Heritage Day with Farley presenting a program on the Irish of Barclay Mountain.

Print and Electronic Circulation: Four issues of The Settler were sent out this year along with the annual issue of the Annual. There was mass mailing to multiple zip codes, resulting in new members. Digital members now total 66, which is one-fifth of current members. The company has been featured in local newspapers over 150 times. The website has been used by 6,100 people in the past year. The Facebook page has 1,995 subscribers, up from 198 since the 2020 annual meeting. The Twitter page has 91 subscribers and the YouTube channel has 90 subscribers, 44 more since the 2020 meeting.

Museum: Carl reported that he worked for several months last winter designing 24 panels that tell the 150-year history of the Bradford County Historical Society; the exhibition opened on June 7. College intern Jonathon Gulyas was the tour guide this year in the museum. Many compliments were received during his detailed tours of the exhibitions.

There were 500 visitors to the museum this season, which was much shorter than usual. Visitors came from 17 states, and there were group tours that included St. Agnes School, Towanda Grade 5 Elementary School, and Towanda High School Summer School. There have been contributions of manuscripts or artifacts from 50 donors since the last annual meeting, as well as numerous other boxes of documents from the attic of the courthouse and a large collection of interesting pieces for the museum exhibits of Richard and Grace Talada.

At the end of his report, Carl acknowledged Farley for his 30 years as a director of the company.

The directors of the company purchased a 4×8 brick outside the Keystone Theater in Towanda to recognize his dedication and service.

Denise Golden, library clerk, said there were 167 registered library users from 18 states since the last annual meeting. There were 344 volunteer hours recorded with 33 last name searches completed, library volunteers completed the filing of archives and photographs, indexing, mailings, diary transcription and work of gardening.

Farley then presented the Clement F. Heverly Outstanding Service Award to the LeRoy Heritage Museum and the Leo. E. Wilt for Historian of the Year at Golden.

After the awards ceremony, the floor was turned over to Michael Burrell, Carrie Hooper and Gary Tucker who presented a program on Philip P. Bliss organized and sponsored by David Lenington. Special thanks to the PP Bliss Songwriter’s Museum for loaning the company the Bliss melodeon for the event.


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The Mason History Society hosts a home visit https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-mason-history-society-hosts-a-home-visit/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-mason-history-society-hosts-a-home-visit/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 16:41:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-mason-history-society-hosts-a-home-visit/ MASON, Mich. (WILX) – This year, the Mason Area Historical Society Homes Tour will feature seven properties in the Mason Area. The visit will take place on Saturday October 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Tickets are $ 15 per person and can be purchased in advance in downtown Mason at the Ware Pharmacy, […]]]>

MASON, Mich. (WILX) – This year, the Mason Area Historical Society Homes Tour will feature seven properties in the Mason Area. The visit will take place on Saturday October 9 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Tickets are $ 15 per person and can be purchased in advance in downtown Mason at the Ware Pharmacy, Bestsellers Bookstore, and Maple Street Mall. All tickets still available on Saturday will be at the Museum, located at 200 E. Oak Street, and will open at 10:00 a.m.

“Many people still start their visit to the Mason Area Historical Museum,” says Doug Klein, president of the Society. “Not only can people buy their tickets there, but the building was also originally the town house of John Rayner, a prominent 19th century Freemason Citizen. It’s fun to learn about the many ways the building has changed over the decades, from a house to a church to a museum.

While specific tour locations and additional details can be found on the ticket / brochure, here are some of the highlights that will be presented:

  • A distinctive visiting house was built in 1903 on the foundation of the very first Presbyterian church in Mason, which had burned down. The Presbyterians then built the current “stone church” at the corner of Barnes and Maple streets. At the start of the pandemic, the owners refurbished all hardwood floors, including the kitchen floor. Retaining the original woodwork and plinths, they painted the interior and exterior, added a staircase, and raised the ceiling in the back room. In the back yard, they sunk a patio and did other landscaping. The backyard of the house overlooks the Ingham County Courthouse.
  • Also overlooking the courthouse is a no-elevator apartment on the third floor of the tour. It is in a historic building that has been in almost continuous use since 1873. The building housed a newspaper office, a fraternal organization meeting room and a bank. The current owners purchased the building in 2004 to use the first floor as retail space. In 2018, the second and third floors were renovated into four apartments. You will visit one of the third floor lofts available for short term rental. The stairs are steep, but your careful ascent will be rewarded with a bird’s eye view of the magnificent Ingham County Courthouse.
  • With a front room that is a perfect setting for a Christmas tree, this 1890 visitor’s home has undergone renovations and updates over the decades, including those by the current owner. The two bedrooms at the front have original stained glass windows. A former mother-in-law’s apartment has been renovated to make way for an upstairs laundry room, a full bathroom and a living room ideal for bird watching. Cardinals, orioles, hummingbirds, brown warblers, nuthatches and other songbirds flit around this Victorian home of Queen Anne.
  • Built in 1939, the original structure of this visitor’s house was a one-and-a-half storey Cape Cod. Over the years, the owners have made additions to the house and added several outbuildings, including a garden house studio with an adjoining greenhouse. Several gardens and a variety of specimen trees also adorn the surrounding courtyard.
  • A more contemporary visitor’s house, originally built in 1984, was extended in 2008 and almost doubled the size of the house. It also added to its unique layout with two stairs to the lower level. The current owners bought the house in 2013 and have carried out several nice renovations, especially to the five bedrooms. While the master bedroom on the second level was originally closed, it is now a mezzanine bedroom with a small terrace, a walk-in closet and a huge bathroom with a bath, shower, jacuzzi tub and three sinks. Don’t miss the pool room, home office and sewing room located on the lower level and in the basement.

All proceeds from this event go to the Mason Area Historical Museum and the Pink School Museum, both owned and maintained by the Mason Area Historical Society, with the support of dedicated volunteers and the community.

Copyright 2021 WILX. All rights reserved.

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Historic “Wicked Wilmington” speech to take place on October 12 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/historic-wicked-wilmington-speech-to-take-place-on-october-12/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/historic-wicked-wilmington-speech-to-take-place-on-october-12/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 11:21:50 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/historic-wicked-wilmington-speech-to-take-place-on-october-12/ Delaware historian Kevin McGonegal will present a live online discussion on his new book, “Wicked Wilmington, Delaware,” at 5 pm Tuesday, October 12, hosted by the Lewes Public Library, the Delaware Historical Society and Browseabout Books. “Wicked Wilmington” takes readers on a journey through crime and vice in 20th century Wilmington, from a bawdy-house on […]]]>

Delaware historian Kevin McGonegal will present a live online discussion on his new book, “Wicked Wilmington, Delaware,” at 5 pm Tuesday, October 12, hosted by the Lewes Public Library, the Delaware Historical Society and Browseabout Books.

“Wicked Wilmington” takes readers on a journey through crime and vice in 20th century Wilmington, from a bawdy-house on Tatnall Street to the boardrooms of the DuPont Company. McGonegal brings tales of the dark side of town to life, including a professional killer pleading in self-defense, runaway lovers caught in an international extortion scheme, and more. Visit the former New Castle County Labor House, the scene of a robbery by a mob of lynchers and the daring escape of a notorious murderer. Readers encounter a police chief trying to keep his corrupt practices a secret, officers raiding political headquarters, and a murdered detective on the streets – all of it was part of city life during this time.

McGonegal will be joined in the conversation by Dr. David Young, executive director of the Delaware Historical Society.

A longtime Wilmingtonian, McGonegal holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Fairfield University and currently serves on the boards of the Delaware Historical Society and Wilmington’s Downtown Visions. He worked in the Wilmington Mayor’s Office under three mayors, including as Director of OMB and as Chief of Staff to the Mayor. He has spent the past 33 years in the Wilmington commercial real estate market and has taught for the Master of Public Administration program at the University of Delaware.

The discussion is free to the public. Registration is compulsory. To register, go to lewes.lib.de.us and visit the Virtual Programs for Adults page.

Participants are also encouraged to support the author by purchasing a copy of the book from the local independent bookstore Browseabout Books. Each copy purchased is accompanied by an archival ex-libris signed by the author. Orders can be placed online at browseaboutbooks.com, by calling the store at 302-226-2665, or in person at 133 Rehoboth Ave., Rehoboth Beach.

To learn more about the Delaware Historical Society, visit dehistory.org.


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Wisconsin Historical Society Releases COVID-19 Posters https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wisconsin-historical-society-releases-covid-19-posters/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wisconsin-historical-society-releases-covid-19-posters/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:30:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wisconsin-historical-society-releases-covid-19-posters/ MADISON, Wisconsin – Almost two years after COVID-19 began to disrupt our world, we are still not back to normal. But sooner or later this pandemic, like any other historic event, will be in the rearview mirror, said Dave Desimone, director of Black Point Estate and Gardens for the Wisconsin Historical Society. And what we […]]]>

MADISON, Wisconsin – Almost two years after COVID-19 began to disrupt our world, we are still not back to normal.

But sooner or later this pandemic, like any other historic event, will be in the rearview mirror, said Dave Desimone, director of Black Point Estate and Gardens for the Wisconsin Historical Society. And what we create now will make a big difference to what we see in hindsight, he said.

“Our job is to record the good, the bad, and the ugly of every moment that we live in,” Desimone said, “so that historians who follow us can kind of try to make sense of it all.”

The Wisconsin Historical Society is working to help set this record for future generations – while also delivering messages to those of us currently living with the pandemic.

“Getting vaccinated” by Sonia Vasquez. (Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society)

The group COVID-19 poster project brought together artists from across the state to create public information posters about the pandemic. The latest wave of posters, featuring work by 10 adult artists and four students, tackle topics such as immunization, masks and community support.

They are meant to capture the spirit of posters from other historical eras, said Desimone, who coordinated the project – like World War I art pushing people to to plant “victory gardens” Where join the Red Cross.

“We’re very visual, obviously, in the 21st century. Shared memes, and TikTok and Instagram, ”Desimone said. “But the poster has been a very effective means of influencing and shaping public opinion and thought since the 1860s.”

The Historical Society has published its first phase of COVID-19 posters during the first months of the pandemic, in the spring and summer of 2020. This work was real-time reactions to new concerns, such as getting supplies to healthcare workers and groceries for elderly neighbors, said Désimone.

For the second phase of the project, released this fall, the team wanted to focus more on recovery, he said – “how we get through this pandemic and try to get back to the new normal.”

One of the new posters, created by artist and Medical College of Wisconsin student Grant Yun, emphasizes the importance of “Continue the effortEven at this late stage of the pandemic.

“Continue the Effort” by Grant Yun. (Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society)

“Just because we’ve been through a year doesn’t mean the pandemic is over. And it might even get worse if we don’t continue to take these precautions, ”Yun said. “When people see my poster, I just want to remind them that it’s really a group effort. “

Yun, whose mother is an art teacher, said he grew up with art “like second nature.” But he has also long been drawn to science and the idea of ​​helping people as a doctor. This project, he said, was a way to bring these two passions together.

His poster features larger-than-life hands draping a huge blue mask over a classic Midwestern landscape. Yun, who grew up in California, said he was truly inspired by rural Wisconsin’s landscape when he moved to the state, and has a the whole series capture Midwestern landscapes in a minimalist style.

He also wanted to present the blue disposable mask, which he said has become “a staple of everyday life” and a recognizable symbol of our present moment.

“It’s so iconic of a certain period in history,” Yun said.

“I am vaccinated” by Kerrianna Rought. (Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society)

Other posters in the series refer to different historical styles – such as a Victorian style advertisement for vaccination (“Done in the blink of an eye!”) or a bold typographic message to “Trust in science”.

By including students in the second phase, Desimone said the Historical Society also wanted to see the pandemic “through the eyes of people who experience it during their very formative years.”

Kerrianna Rought, a recent Capital High School graduate whose work was featured in the project, said she was excited to share the art with a call to action.

“I like, as an artist, to express my thoughts,” she said. “If I don’t know how to put it into words, I like to visualize it, because I feel like showing is much more effective than saying.”

Rough’s interest in art grew out of a love for video games, cartoons, and cartoons, a style that shines through in his poster. And she said she wanted to feature a black character in her submission because, as a black person herself, she wanted to see more people of color portrayed.

She hopes her poster – which asks the question, “I’m vaccinated.” Are you? ”- can remind people that their decisions during the pandemic also affect the health of those around them.

“I hope this gets people to start making a better place,” Rought said. “And help people rethink some of their mindsets that they might have, especially about vaccinations.”

“The Vax” by Martha Laing. (Courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society)

Martha Laing, a senior at Cambridge High School, also focused on the COVID-19 shots for his poster – a colorful scene inspired by rapper Tyler, the creator.

Although it’s mostly a hobby right now, Laing said she would like to do art professionally in the future. She spent a lot of time creating art while stranded at home during COVID-19, even painting a giant mushroom mural on her wall.

“Before the pandemic hit, I was definitely like an active person – I had to do something after school all the time, I had to go out with friends,” Laing said. “With the pandemic, I was forced to stay on my own and learn more about myself. And I think I really grew as a person throughout that.

The poster – which she finished in a panera bread, en route to a camping trip – shares the message that with the vaccine, “the life you save can be yours.”

Laing said she worked in the restaurant business and was able to get the vaccine very early on. Even though she was worried about feeling sick and had to travel all the way to Milwaukee from her home in Lake Mills to get a date, she walked away from her first dose feeling excited.

“Even the first time around, I knew it wasn’t over, but I was really happy to have part of a vaccine in me,” Laing said. “And I feel like I’m taking steps to be fully immunized and to be more comfortable going out in public.”

Although the pandemic has become an “extremely polarizing thing” in the United States, Desimone said he hoped the poster project could spark dialogue and help people find common ground.

And the artists have already made history: in addition to being available for purchase, COVID-19 posters are also entering the permanent collection of the Historical Society, he added. A century later, they can help people understand the history we are living today.

“I hope we serve well the historians who follow us long after us,” Desimone said, “and there aren’t many gaps in the story.”

Discover all the posters of the two phases of the project on the Wisconsin Historical Society website.


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Kenyon Historical Society holds cemetery walk https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kenyon-historical-society-holds-cemetery-walk/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kenyon-historical-society-holds-cemetery-walk/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 03:50:17 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kenyon-historical-society-holds-cemetery-walk/ The public is invited to walk through Kenyon Cemetery to discover interesting people who have marked Kenyon’s past. This event will take place on Saturday October 9, 2021 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. The Kenyon Area Historical Society (KAHS) has researched nine people who will be featured during the walk. Everyone in every cemetery […]]]>

The public is invited to walk through Kenyon Cemetery to discover interesting people who have marked Kenyon’s past.

This event will take place on Saturday October 9, 2021 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The Kenyon Area Historical Society (KAHS) has researched nine people who will be featured during the walk.

Everyone in every cemetery has a story. If we just take the time to do a little research, it’s amazing what we can learn.

I asked Kevin Anderson from KAHS to share some of the information I got about the people who have lived and breathed in Kenyon over the years.

For example Enoch Thune was born in 1898, at the age of 20 in 1918 he bought the Lyric Music Theater where films were shown in Kenyon.

Thune played drums in the theater’s orchestra pit and was featured at conventions as the youngest movie theater owner in the United States

He met Warner Brothers brass and famous actress Mary Pickford. In the 1920s he also started the Kenyon Ventilator Company with his brother. They sold barn fans all over the world before electricity didom their business.

After the cinema closed in 1938, the brothers had a painting business. Enoch ran for the seat of the US Congress in the First District in 1944.

Tillie Clark came to Kenyon to visit her sister in 1901 and ended up working for her brother-in-law, Dr Gates, who owned the local telephone company. She was a telephone operator for many years. Tillie died in 1978 just 5 months from her 100th birthday.

Floyd and Vera Schwasinger came to Kenyon in the early 1930s to run the Goodhue Canning Company. Vera owned a cafe downtown called Coffee Cup, although most people just called it Vera’s.

Jay Held was the grandfather of the late Howard Held. He was a goalkeeper for the Kenyon High School first football team in 1905.

Magdelene Stolee was a teacher in Kenyon in the 1940s, then served on the school board for over 20 years.

Vernon Reko grew up on Second Street in Kenyon. He worked and then owned the Picha shoe store which started in 1902 and closed in 1986.

Peter Dyrdahl had a grocery store in Kenyon in the 1970s.

Clara Clausen was an artist, poet, justice of the peace and women’s rights advocate. His painting titled “1949 Corn Show Waiting for Cedric” hangs in the Kenyon Public Library.

There is no charge to attend the event. Free will donations supporting the Kenyon Area Historical Society will be accepted.

The rain will force the cancellation of the event.

We are all part of history. Each of us.

LOOK: Things from the year you were born that no longer exist

Iconic (and sometimes silly) toys, technologies and electronics have been usurped since their official entry, either through technological advancements or through breakthroughs in common sense. See how many things on this list trigger childhood memories – and those that were there and gone so quickly you missed them completely.

No more memories.

LOOK: 40 Kellogg’s Cereals in special and discontinued edition


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West Side Rag ”A tribute to the life and legacy of RBG comes to the New-York Historical Society; ‘Not finished yet’ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/west-side-rag-a-tribute-to-the-life-and-legacy-of-rbg-comes-to-the-new-york-historical-society-not-finished-yet/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/west-side-rag-a-tribute-to-the-life-and-legacy-of-rbg-comes-to-the-new-york-historical-society-not-finished-yet/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 14:40:11 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/west-side-rag-a-tribute-to-the-life-and-legacy-of-rbg-comes-to-the-new-york-historical-society-not-finished-yet/ Posted on October 3, 2021 at 10:34 am by Carol Tannenhauser Photographs by Lisa Radla. By Lisa Radla A traveling exhibition from the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, arrived at the New-York Historical Society on West 77th Street and Central Park West. It couldn’t […]]]>

Posted on October 3, 2021 at 10:34 am by Carol Tannenhauser

Photographs by Lisa Radla.

By Lisa Radla

A traveling exhibition from the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, arrived at the New-York Historical Society on West 77th Street and Central Park West. It couldn’t be more timely, as the Supreme Court’s failure to block Texas’ restrictive abortion law reverberates across the country. Until January 23, 2022, museum visitors can revisit the struggles – and successes – of an earlier era through the life and legacy of the late Supreme Court Justice and civil rights pioneer Ruth Bader Ginsburg. .

Right inside the gallery, the sound of Ginsburg’s accent in Brooklyn greets you, a younger Ruth than most know. A video of Judge Ginsburg, then in her sixties, wearing a blue dress with her brown hair pulled back in a blue scrunchie, plays on loop. She answered questions in her 1993 confirmation hearings with various U.S. senators who, in the end, would easily affirm her nomination with a 96 to 3 vote.

Visitors walk through the life of Ginsburg, from the teenage girl who was appointed a “camp rabbi” at Camp Che-Na-Wah in 1948, to a photo of her as a bridesmaid at the wedding of a friend in 1951, and a 3D render of a bedroom in his childhood home in Brooklyn. Just around the corner from this part of the show is a striking sign listing “Some of the Things Women Couldn’t Do in the 1930s and 1940s”.

Meanwhile, women couldn’t practice law, receive equal pay for equal work, attend a military academy or Ivy League school, sit on a jury, wear pants on the floor of the United States Senate, owning property without a man controlling it, or opening a bank account without a man’s permission. The striking part is not just how antediluvian these things were, but how this little woman became the larger-than-life icon that was going to erase them.

This little woman has become a larger than life icon.

Ginsburg’s life mission, as the exhibit notes, was to secure the Constitution’s “We the People” promise for everyone. To do this, she first went to Cornell, where she graduated at the top of her class. At Harvard Law School, she became the school’s first female Law Review member before graduating first in her class at Columbia Law School (while residing at 404 West 116th Street).

Soon after, the women’s rights champion was arguing cases on the federal circuit and in the United States Supreme Court. The retrospective devotes a larger description to some of these cases. But there is a smaller section which is just as important. Entitled “Litigating Equality”, it details RBG’s role in a number of other cases, including the legal battle against the forced sterilization of black women and the fight to ensure equal rights for pregnant women and men who are pregnant. are denied survivor benefits on the basis of gender. distinctions.

Museum staff indicate at the start of the exhibit that photography is only allowed in two places: one is the giant red collage when you first enter and the other, thankfully, is at the very top. end. In an exhibition containing real gems of information and artifacts, where visitors were multigenerational, cross-cultural, and included slightly more women than men, the end could be the jewel in the crown.

The essentials (including the darling.)

Next to the 3D render of the country’s highest court is a glass enclosure. It contains Ginsburg’s dress and dissenting collar, her blue scrunchie and a pair of her white gloves that she initially wore at Judge Sandra Day O’Connor’s suggestion to protect herself while undergoing chemotherapy for cancer. colon.

There is a very real representation of a detailed icon’s accomplishments throughout. The sense of loss and pride is palpable, made tangible by the sniffles, deep sighs and tears of many who have read and learned in silence about the struggles waged for them by RBG.

Opposite her personal items are photographs of city memorabilia, memorabilia and signs left behind by mourners after Judge Ginsburg passed away on September 18, 2020. “It was not her court, but she was me. said it could be mine, ”one panel read. “Thank you RBG. Rest in peace. We’re going to win this thing for you, ”notes another.

The final sign of the exhibit reads: “Not Done Yet” – a hopeful promise of the Notorious RBG’s legacy passing the torch to the next generation.

The New-York Historical Society is located on Central Park West between 76th and 77th streets. Hours: Wednesday – Thursday: 11 am-5pm; Friday: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday to Sunday: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call (212) 873-3400 for more information on admission or click here.


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Pittsylvania Historical Society Urges County to Invest in New Director for Museums and Historic Sites | Local News https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pittsylvania-historical-society-urges-county-to-invest-in-new-director-for-museums-and-historic-sites-local-news/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pittsylvania-historical-society-urges-county-to-invest-in-new-director-for-museums-and-historic-sites-local-news/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pittsylvania-historical-society-urges-county-to-invest-in-new-director-for-museums-and-historic-sites-local-news/ “They are in good hands, but other places are not,” said Sonja Ingram, associate director of field preservation services for Preservation Virginia, a statewide historic preservation group. . Preservation Support local journalism Your subscription makes our report possible. {{featured_button_text}} Not only could a principal help promote the sites maintained by the county, Ingram said, but […]]]>

“They are in good hands, but other places are not,” said Sonja Ingram, associate director of field preservation services for Preservation Virginia, a statewide historic preservation group. .

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Not only could a principal help promote the sites maintained by the county, Ingram said, but he could also protect other people found in Pittsylvania, including historic mills, historic schools (including eight schools in Rosenwald intended for Afro- Americans), historic African-American communities, native fishing dams, historic cemeteries, small towns, railway heritage, Revolutionary War and Civil War sites, plantations including Oak Hill, barns at tobacco, historic churches and other sites.

“These are the things that make Pittsylvania County unique,” ​​Ingram said. “They have intrinsic charm and beauty and are a visible manifestation of a place’s character.”

Scenic panoramas could also be preserved and protected, Ingram added.

“People come from all over just to drive and see the landscapes of the county,” she said.






A horse-drawn hearse is prominently displayed in the entrance to the Simpson Funeral Museum in Chatham. The museum tells the story of funeral services and rites from ancient history to modern years.


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As for the county museums, they also include the Pittsylvania County History Research Center in Chatham Railroad Depot, the Simpson’s Funeral Museum, and the AAF Tank Museum.

“Pittsylvania County has so many historic resources to offer, but few people [even locals] are aware of this because they have not been officially promoted and marketed at the county level, ”Ingram said. “Historical societies and museums do a great job, but as voluntary organizations there is little they can do. “


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Human Rights Campaign Supports Minneapolis Councilor Andrea Jenkins for Re-election https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/human-rights-campaign-supports-minneapolis-councilor-andrea-jenkins-for-re-election/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/human-rights-campaign-supports-minneapolis-councilor-andrea-jenkins-for-re-election/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 13:48:55 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/human-rights-campaign-supports-minneapolis-councilor-andrea-jenkins-for-re-election/ In 2017, Councilor Jenkins became the first openly transgender black woman elected to public office in the United States. Councilor Jenkins represents Minneapolis 8th Ward, which includes George Floyd Square. Last year, Councilor Jenkins launched a “Commitment to End Violence Against Black and Brown Transgender Women” as part of the Human Rights Campaign’s Transgender Justice […]]]>

In 2017, Councilor Jenkins became the first openly transgender black woman elected to public office in the United States. Councilor Jenkins represents Minneapolis 8th Ward, which includes George Floyd Square.

Last year, Councilor Jenkins launched a “Commitment to End Violence Against Black and Brown Transgender Women” as part of the Human Rights Campaign’s Transgender Justice Initiative. Prior to her election, Councilor Jenkins served as oral historian for the Transgender Oral History Project at the University of Minnesota Libraries, documenting the lived experiences of transgender and gender non-conforming people in the Upper Midwest and the United States. . His work as a poet and artist includes collections such as Queer Voices: Poetry, Prose and Pride (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2019), A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2016), and Blues Vision: African American Writing from Minnesota (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2015.

“Councilor Jenkins’ historic election and public service demonstrated the power and importance of her leadership in Minneapolis and nationally.” said JoDee Winterhof, Senior Vice President of the Human Rights Campaign for Politics and Political Affairs. “His work defending and promoting LGBTQ + equality has made a difference to residents of the city of Minneapolis and throughout Minnesota, which is home to more than 175,000 LGBTQ + adults. Councilor Jenkins has long been an important community leader and voice for change, and this was especially the case following the murder of George Floyd. Her calls for racism to be treated as a public health crisis have helped to highlight the direct link between discrimination and violence, exemplified by the epidemic of violent deaths facing transgender Americans, especially transgender women from across the country. color. The Human Rights Campaign is proud to support Councilor Jenkins for her re-election to ensure Minneapolis continues to benefit from her remarkable leadership.


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Characters from the past come to life on Ghost Walk https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/characters-from-the-past-come-to-life-on-ghost-walk/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/characters-from-the-past-come-to-life-on-ghost-walk/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:15:45 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/characters-from-the-past-come-to-life-on-ghost-walk/ The lives, hopes, achievements, adventures and trials of six Highland County area historical figures were personified in dramatic tales on Tuesday as part of the Highland County Historical Society’s annual ghost walk held at Hillsboro Cemetery. Anna Catherine “Kitty” Newby, “Mourning Emma”, Sarah Ella “Byrde” Ayres, George Beecher, Reverend Emile Grand-Girard and Granville Barrere (performed […]]]>

The lives, hopes, achievements, adventures and trials of six Highland County area historical figures were personified in dramatic tales on Tuesday as part of the Highland County Historical Society’s annual ghost walk held at Hillsboro Cemetery.

Anna Catherine “Kitty” Newby, “Mourning Emma”, Sarah Ella “Byrde” Ayres, George Beecher, Reverend Emile Grand-Girard and Granville Barrere (performed by Debbie Newby Williams, Carolyn Hastings, Dr. Tara Beery, Dr. Jeff Beery , Robert Brown and Steve Roush, respectively), were the six notable people who saw their stories posthumously told through a dramatic re-enactment at the event.

Among these was the story of Granville Barrere, whose “ghost” recounted how his views as editor and editor of the News-Herald, circa 1908, often led him to interesting confrontations with those in the know. disagreed with him.

Sarah Ella “Byrde” Ayres, another local citizen who was profiled, was an accountant turned professional photographer and was the first person to purchase an admission ticket to the Colony Theater in Hillsboro when it opened in 1938.

George Beecher’s last name may be recognizable because his aunt, Harriet-Beecher Stowe, wrote “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”.

Reverend Emile Grand-Girard, who immigrated from France, served as a Presbyterian pastor in Mowrystown, where there was a large French population.

Anna Catherine “Kitty” Newby was the wife of Judge Cyrus Newby, who served as Highland County Common Pleas Judge from 1892 to 1918.

Finally, “Mourning Emma” illustrates the mourning practices of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

John Glaze of the Historical Society, president of the Ghost Walk, said that although he wrote most of the scripts, “our ghosts often take what I write and do their own research to find their own version.” He said that Hastings and Newby Williams, who played “Mourning Emma” and Anna Catherine, “Kitty” Newby, wrote their own scripts.

Newby Williams, a historical fiction author who recently self-published “Hillsboro’s Mystery Child” about Sarah Dorney Stroup, a 4-year-old girl who was abandoned in a train depot in Hillsboro in 1857 and taken in by the famous advocate of the temperance, Eliza Thompson had heard about the historical society’s annual Ghost Walk and thought it was the perfect opportunity to tell the story of her great-great-grandmother, Anna Catherine “Kitty” Newby. Newby Williams said she had “always wanted to be a part of it,” so she asked Glaze to volunteer to play her great-great-grandmother, Newby. Newby Williams said her previous experience as an educator helped her prepare for the public speaking required for the presentation.

This year there were more ghosts and less walking, as the event allowed attendees to bring lawn chairs and gather around a stage near the cemetery chapel, instead of walking, like in the past.

For more information about Highland County Historical Society, call 937-393-3392.

Juliane Cartaino is a stringer for The Times-Gazette.

Highland County Coroner Jeff Beery holds a photo of George Beecher, the person he represented on Tuesday’s HCHS Ghost Walk.

The historical society hosts an event every year at Hillsboro Cemetery


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