Historical Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Just another WordPress site Wed, 21 Jul 2021 10:23:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Historical Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Tallman House Tree Believed To Be Alive Since Lincoln Visit Loses Some Limbs | Jefferson County Area http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/tallman-house-tree-believed-to-be-alive-since-lincoln-visit-loses-some-limbs-jefferson-county-area/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/tallman-house-tree-believed-to-be-alive-since-lincoln-visit-loses-some-limbs-jefferson-county-area/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 10:00:00 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/tallman-house-tree-believed-to-be-alive-since-lincoln-visit-loses-some-limbs-jefferson-county-area/ JANESVILLE – One of the largest, oldest, and arguably most historic oak trees in Janesville is losing limbs, and the Rock County Historical Society is trying to figure out why and how to save the tree. Officials said that during a windless and calm night on Saturday, the giant bur oak on the northwest side […]]]>

JANESVILLE – One of the largest, oldest, and arguably most historic oak trees in Janesville is losing limbs, and the Rock County Historical Society is trying to figure out why and how to save the tree.

Officials said that during a windless and calm night on Saturday, the giant bur oak on the northwest side of the historic society’s Lincoln-Tallman Restoration grounds lost a huge body of limbs. They broke loose and fell to the ground.

The oak tree, known locally as the “witness tree,” has stood on the property of Tallman House since at least the 1850s. The tree is believed to have lived when former President Abraham Lincoln visited the Tallman House in October 1859 .

The oak, which stands nearly 100 feet tall and has a trunk big enough that two men cannot reach it all around its circumference, is possibly the oldest tree on the Tallman campus. Over the course of its long life, the tree has witnessed the rise of Lincoln, but also countless weddings, high school portrait sessions, ice cream parties, and most recently the Tallman Arts Festival. All this and more took place in the shade under the vast expanse of branches of the majestic tree.

The grounds under the tree are now slightly less shaded after the big branch broke on Saturday.

A local arborist walking past the Tallman House on Sunday saw the tree had a huge branch, said Tim Maahs, executive director of the Rock County Historical Society.

The historical society and two private arborists examined the tree on Monday and said the loss of limbs is likely due to a common tree disease called “sudden branch fall syndrome” – a disorder in which healthy tree limbs and alive suddenly break and fall from an otherwise healthy tree to trees. This often happens at night and for no clear reason.

The disorder is considered common in large oaks, although arborists aren’t sure exactly why it happens. Some believe that branch fall syndrome may be linked to trees infected over time with bacteria or fungi.

Maahs said the same tree lost some large healthy branches about three decades ago. Another burgeoning oak nearby has grown stunted and lost limbs similarly over the years.

Maahs said arborists observing old wounds on the trunk suspected the tree could be suffering from branch fall disorder for years.

The oak is believed to have earned its nickname, the witness tree, because Lincoln reportedly sat below and had a picnic in early October 1859 when he visited the Tallman House.

Maahs said it was understood that the tree and other large-fruited oaks on the Tallman property existed at the time of Lincoln’s visit to the Tallman House 162 years ago. But he said the historical society has no documented evidence that Lincoln actually sat under the big tree for dinner when he visited Janesville.

“They didn’t seem to have eaten here. It’s probably one of those stories that kind of developed over time, ”he said. “We have never been able to confirm that this actually happened. “

Maahs said arborists are now working to properly seal the tree’s new wound and protect its old scars from fungi, bacteria and insects that can cause a burn that can threaten these adult oaks.

He said arborists plan to drill holes in the large oak tree that will allow its trunk to drain water from existing cavities left by old wounds. The arborists also plan to reconnect a set of lightning rods that have been anchored to the tree for years to protect it from lightning strikes, Maahs said.

Maahs said the historical society had considered shredding the huge fallen branch, which had arches two or three feet thick. But he said the group instead decided to send the members to a local lumberyard.

Later, Maahs said, the historical society will order artwork from the wood of the tree that could be sold to those looking for a unique piece of Lincoln history.

On Monday, only a few lost leaves from the tree filtered down to the ground, but Maahs pointed out that the large oak has several branches that overlook the Stone House, a pillar on the north side of the Tallman property.

The building is an old stone shotgun house that was built as an annex to an original log house built on Saint-Laurent Avenue. Two women commissioned the house to move to the Tallman property in 1965. The Stone House has remained on the site, its porch facing Mineral Point Avenue, ever since.

Maahs said the historical society plans this fall to fund a $ 100,000 project to rotate the house 180 degrees so that its porch faces the Tallman House. The plan is to rehabilitate the old house into space for weddings and other events.

It would be up to the historical society, Maahs said, to try to maintain a tree that towers over the old stone house and that stood on the same part of the Tallman property for decades before. It is a tree associated with the entire Tallman property. But furthermore, it is known for the events of spring, summer and fall which invariably draw crowds that nestle in the shade of the massive and well-known oak tree.

“I still have older people asking, ‘Are you still going to make ice cream under the big oak tree?’ Maahs said. “It’s been years since we hosted the Ice Cream Parlor.”


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Ninety Six asks about the factory site project; volunteers beautify the city | New http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ninety-six-asks-about-the-factory-site-project-volunteers-beautify-the-city-new/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ninety-six-asks-about-the-factory-site-project-volunteers-beautify-the-city-new/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ninety-six-asks-about-the-factory-site-project-volunteers-beautify-the-city-new/ NINETY SIX – The Ninety Six government could push ahead with plans to renovate the former Ninety Six Cotton Mill office building, while city volunteers have made great strides in improving the appearance of the city center. At Monday’s regular city council meeting, council member Bridget Porter brought forward a motion to temporarily halt the […]]]>

NINETY SIX – The Ninety Six government could push ahead with plans to renovate the former Ninety Six Cotton Mill office building, while city volunteers have made great strides in improving the appearance of the city center.

At Monday’s regular city council meeting, council member Bridget Porter brought forward a motion to temporarily halt the city’s work with the Ninety Six Historical Society to repair the old mill building at 218 Duke St. The building is owned by the city, and the city was working with the historical society as a nonprofit organization that could lead fundraising efforts for the project.

Porter said that due to ongoing issues at the site, she proposed that the city stop pursuing this project for now. She said a quote gave an estimate of the cost of removing lead and asbestos from the site, but did not take into account the costs of repairing and restoring the building’s utilities. She also said the city has other projects to focus its efforts and funds on.

“I understand Bridget’s reservations, but I personally think we should keep moving forward,” Mayor Mike Rowe said.

Jennifer Donlon, president of the historical society, said she came to the meeting on Monday to get answers on the city’s position on the project. She said she was ready to apply for several grants, but needed a solid cost estimate from the city. The building is city-owned and the historical society was willing to function as a fundraising and grant-writing partner, she said.

A deadline had already passed for one of the grants Donlon was reviewing at Monday’s meeting.

Porter’s motion received an equal vote, with Porter, board member Mickey Goodman and board member Charles Stevens voting to stop work for the time being, and Rowe, board member Kellar Rogers and board member Wayne Gibert voting against the motion. The motion failed due to a tie vote, and Rowe said the city would seek a more final estimate of the cost of renovating the building.

This year’s SC Festival of Stars was a success and grossed nearly $ 4,000, Goodman said. The town has been approved for around $ 15,000 in Greenwood County hospitality tax funds for next year’s festival, said tourism director Margie Blalock, but without hospitality tax money for the festival. bluegrass slated for fall, city officials have decided to delay the start of the new annual Festival.

Jimmy Peden, president of Connect Lake Greenwood, led the volunteer efforts to beautify the city. He informed council that since June 20, volunteers have pruned, sprayed, demarcated and mulched several gardens in town. This first phase of volunteer work will still include irrigating and lighting the gardens, but Peden said he expects the work to be completed by early fall.

“Phase two is really about businesses and facades,” he said.

After those gardens are finished, he said he wants to talk to owners of vacant downtown businesses to see how to beautify the main part of town. He said he did some research on the grants, but said most of the fundraising would start after the gardens were completed and people could see the fruits of the work of these volunteers.

He left town with good news about the Hardees who burned down in 2019.

“I spoke with Hardee’s,” he says. “I can say 97% that they are coming back and doing renovations. “

Kim Crawford, a resident of Ninety Six Mill Village, asked council about several homes that have repeatedly violated city ordinances regarding lawn care and property maintenance. She asked what could be done, in addition to continuing to impose fines on these residents by the police.

“For us, a ticket is a last resort here,” said Deira Collier, public information officer for the Ninety Six Police Force. “We talk to them and we talk to them. We do whatever the law allows us to do.

Contact editor-in-chief Damian Dominguez at 864-634-7548 or follow us on Twitter @IJDDOMINGUEZ.


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‘He would belong to our community’ | Local News http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/he-would-belong-to-our-community-local-news/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/he-would-belong-to-our-community-local-news/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 07:30:00 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/he-would-belong-to-our-community-local-news/ While going out with her dog, “Persi”, Pam Holen decided to take a walk in the grounds of the Flavel House Museum. The master gardener, agitated by months of cabin fever during the coronavirus pandemic, was overwhelmed by the vision of polishing one of Astoria’s gems. Holen’s new Flavel House Garden Society will begin a […]]]>

While going out with her dog, “Persi”, Pam Holen decided to take a walk in the grounds of the Flavel House Museum. The master gardener, agitated by months of cabin fever during the coronavirus pandemic, was overwhelmed by the vision of polishing one of Astoria’s gems.

Holen’s new Flavel House Garden Society will begin a revitalization project this week to restore the gardens to their original Victorian-era beauty. She hopes the project can attract a dedicated sustainable team to see what could be a grueling endeavor.






The gardens of Maison Flavel date from the 1880s.




“There are a lot of balls in the air when you do a project like this,” Holen said. “It won’t be the perfect Victorian garden next summer. It’s going to take time, which is why we need sustainability.

The gardening society operates under the wing of the Clatsop County Historical Society, the informal organization dedicated to preserving the history of the area.

With gardens that have been around since the 1880s, more research is needed to identify what types of plants can bloom all year round and bloom at different times so that the grounds can attract seasonal visitors. Many trees planted at the start of the garden have grown significantly, Holen said, which means different levels of sunlight present challenges for what can and cannot be planted.

For these reasons, Holen describes it as an educational project. In addition to learning about the history of the Flavels, the famous maritime family, visitors were able to learn about the biodiversity and types of gardens typical of the Victorian era.

McAndrew Burns, the historical society’s executive director, estimates the improvement could help Flavel House attract up to 75,000 visitors a year, almost double what they typically see.

Before the vision can be fully realized, however, the gardening company needs as many hands on the bridge as possible.

“The first step is to get people to show interest, get them out here and just clean up the weeds,” Holen said. “Once you’ve removed the weeds and mulched, you can step back and think, ‘Now what should we do? “”

Revitalization will begin with weeding and mulching before winter. The work will take place from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Monday evening, then from 10 a.m. to noon on Wednesday morning. Placement of new plants and composting could take place by next spring.

“We are really grateful for anyone coming or having interest. We’re not looking for a lifetime commitment, ”Burns said. “But if you’ve got a few hours and you want to come and pull the weeds and lay down some mulch, we’ll have some snacks and refreshments.”






Flavel house garden

The Maison Flavel revitalization project begins this week.




Restoring the Flavel House gardens could offer Astorians more than an increase in tourism and a taste of horticultural education, organizers say. It might give people a deeper sense of pride after a tough time.

“It wouldn’t belong to you. It wouldn’t belong to me. It would belong to our community, ”said Holen.

The success of past plans to rejuvenate the Flavel House, such as a cleanup that took place before the museum’s inclusion in a recent horror film, gives Burns hope for the Gardens.

“People are very proud of it,” he said. “Whenever she needs a little help, like painting or now, with the land, I think the community comes together and realizes that this is one of the most important parts of what the people of Astoria see. “


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The Recorder – New Salem Resident Presents North Prescott History http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-recorder-new-salem-resident-presents-north-prescott-history/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-recorder-new-salem-resident-presents-north-prescott-history/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 16:06:25 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-recorder-new-salem-resident-presents-north-prescott-history/ NEW SALEM – Standing among the trees outside Gate 20 of Quabbin Reservoir, it’s hard to imagine that there were once two general stores and a church just a few feet away occupying land now covered in forest. New Salem resident Don Flye gave a historical presentation on North Prescott, a village in the disintegrated […]]]>

NEW SALEM – Standing among the trees outside Gate 20 of Quabbin Reservoir, it’s hard to imagine that there were once two general stores and a church just a few feet away occupying land now covered in forest.

New Salem resident Don Flye gave a historical presentation on North Prescott, a village in the disintegrated town of Prescott, which was abandoned to create the Quabbin Reservoir.

Flye’s presentation focused on the history of Prescott Church, which he said was sold by the Metropolitan District Commission in 1947, preserving it by changing its location.

“On January 8, 1947, the MDC sold it to the Prescott Historical Society for $ 5 with the stipulation that it be removed from the property by December 1, 1948,” said Flye. “The church was then dismantled and moved to Orange.”

The church remained in Orange until 1985 when the Prescott Historical Society merged with the Swift River Valley Historical Society. At this point, the church was moved a second time to its current location in New Salem. Due to its multiple relocations, the Swift River Valley Historical Society website indicates that the church is “arguably the best-attended church in the country.”

Flye also noted the presence of two general stores, one next to the church and the other across the street. In a discussion with one of the audience members, they concluded that people would buy items from the store that they couldn’t get from the Sears, Roebuck and Co. catalog – the mail order service. from the 19th century from current retailer Sears.

The presentation was the fourth of its kind, along with further data from the villages of Puppyville and Millington, both of which are mostly submerged in the reservoir. A significant portion of North Prescott is still above water, but the city’s disintegration required every building to be razed or moved.

The Quabbin Reservoir was created between 1930 and 1939 because Boston and other cities in the eastern part of the state needed a larger water supply. It reached full volume in 1946 and the project cost more than $ 50 million, according to the 1991 book “Quabbin Facts and Figures” published by the Friends of Quabbin and the Metropolitan District Commission.

Flye, a mechanical engineer by training, has lived in Petersham and New Salem all his life. He said he loved history and hearing the stories of people losing their homes had inspired him to go deeper into the construction of the Quabbin Reservoir.

“Prescott was the first city taken,” said Flye. “The city was mostly made up of old people and couldn’t fight too hard. They took the money and moved. Most of the area’s farmers in the 1800s moved west.

He started giving these presentations as a way to add another event to Old Home Day in New Salem, as it allowed people to “know the history of the area”. Old Home Day is an annual city-wide event celebrating the city and history of New Salem. Flye said the celebration had to be canceled this year due to a lack of volunteers.

“This is the first time without volunteers,” said Flye. “Small towns are changing and losing that sense of community. ”

New Salem resident Jerry Schone, who lives near Gate 20, stumbled across the presentation as he stepped out to pick blueberries and strawberries. He said he enjoyed learning more about the city and its neighboring reservoir because of its unique qualities.

“I love the story, in part because a lot of it is preserved in place, it doesn’t change,” Schone said. “It’s the combination of houses that still exist that stand next to cellar holes.”

Schone said the history of New Salem is “more accessible” than other places and that it is “fascinating” to learn more.

“We find stability, a sense of place and local history,” said Schone. “It’s a smaller, slower world.”

Chris Larabee can be reached at clarabee@recorder.com or 413-930-4081.


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Taos County Historical Society lecture shines a light on the mysterious 1839 female traveler of the Santa Fe Trail http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/taos-county-historical-society-lecture-shines-a-light-on-the-mysterious-1839-female-traveler-of-the-santa-fe-trail/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/taos-county-historical-society-lecture-shines-a-light-on-the-mysterious-1839-female-traveler-of-the-santa-fe-trail/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 20:40:34 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/taos-county-historical-society-lecture-shines-a-light-on-the-mysterious-1839-female-traveler-of-the-santa-fe-trail/ Marie Félicité Saint-Vrain TCHS News: The Taos County Historical Society announces the return of its monthly public programs starting at 2 p.m. on August 7 at Kit Carson Electric Cooperative Conference Room at 118 Cruz Alta Road in Taos. Speaker Christine St. Vrain Fischahs will present “Shedding Light on the mysterious traveler of the Santa […]]]>

Marie Félicité Saint-Vrain

TCHS News:

The Taos County Historical Society announces the return of its monthly public programs starting at 2 p.m. on August 7 at Kit Carson Electric Cooperative Conference Room at 118 Cruz Alta Road in Taos.

Speaker Christine St. Vrain Fischahs will present “Shedding Light on the mysterious traveler of the Santa Fe Trail of 1839 ”.

Entrance is free for Society members with a suggested donation of $ 5 for non-members.

Born in 1823, Marie Felicite St. Vrain was inducted into the Santa Fe Trail Association Hall of Fame in 2017 for his travels in 1839 along the Santa Fe Mountain Road Trail and she is considered one of the first known females to do so.

Marie was also honored in 2020 with a Women in Americans History award from the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution. Marie’s father, an Indian agent murdered during the Black Hawk War of 1832, prompted favorite uncle Ceran St. Vrain to fix it visit in 1839 at the age of 16 at Bent’s Fort, CO. Only mentioned briefly in two books, join Christine St. Vrain Fischahs traveling to learn more about this mysterious woman.

Christine St. Vrain Fischahs has close family ties to New Mexico, dating back to 1820s when his 4th great-uncle, Ceran St. Vrain, ventured from St. Louis, MO to Taos, NM.

His great-grandfather, James B. Jones, was lieutenant governor of New Mexico from 1943 to 1947. His great-uncle, born in Albuquerque, was the playwright Preston St. Vrain Jones.

Christine is a retired paralegal who lives in Los Alamos. She is a genealogist, historian, writer and current member of the Taos Mountain Chapter of the American Revolution, the Santa Fe Trail Association, the historic and preservation foundation of the St. Vrain Mill and the New Mexico Genealogical Society. In addition, as co-chair of publications for the SFTA, Christine created the site www.santafetrail200.org to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Santa Fe Trail.

The Taos County Historical Society is a 501-c-3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the study and preservation of historic resources in Taos County and northern Nova Scotia Mexico. Membership is open to anyone interested. Visit www.taoscountyhistoricalsociety.org for membership and additional information.


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The leader of the Montgomery Historical Society, Duncan, was often called upon for his wisdom. http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-leader-of-the-montgomery-historical-society-duncan-was-often-called-upon-for-his-wisdom/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-leader-of-the-montgomery-historical-society-duncan-was-often-called-upon-for-his-wisdom/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 19:58:25 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-leader-of-the-montgomery-historical-society-duncan-was-often-called-upon-for-his-wisdom/ During most of the Republic of Texas era, 1836-1846, the community of Montgomery was the county seat of an area stretching from the Brazos rivers to the Trinity rivers, from west to east and in 1840 from Spring Creek north of San Antonio Road, now essentially Texas 21. Grand was the town, a favorite site […]]]>

During most of the Republic of Texas era, 1836-1846, the community of Montgomery was the county seat of an area stretching from the Brazos rivers to the Trinity rivers, from west to east and in 1840 from Spring Creek north of San Antonio Road, now essentially Texas 21. Grand was the town, a favorite site for visitors such as then President of the Republic Sam Houston and historical events in the area before. and during the Republic era were important.

It is an honor of the highest historical reputation to preside over a historical society whose roots go back to this historical period. For about a dozen years, Billy Ray Duncan occupied this coveted office in his hometown, the home of Charles Bellinger Stewart, Texas first secretary of state and officially recognized designer of the Texas Lone Star Flag.

Given the city’s historic presence, it’s no surprise that the Montgomery Historical Society has been researched as a historical source across the United States. Some examples began in 2010 when Billy Ray received a call from the president of the State History Society of Arizona who was then preparing a document to celebrate his state’s upcoming 100th anniversary. The man was looking for information on a small community called Arizona somewhere in Texas. After exhaustive research, Billy Ray discovered that the site was just northeast of Huntsville near Riverside – and on the property of his wife’s brother, Esther, also of Montgomery.

Another call led him to trace the story of a marshal of the law in the city of Carthage, north Texas (the hometown of famous country singer and Conroe radio star, Mary McCoy). These are just a few examples of Billy Ray’s service as a visiting scholar.

Locally, the Montgomery Historical Society is the essential custodian of many of the city’s historic structures. Examples include the Simonton Museum, the epicenter of historic Fernland, and the famous Nat Hart Davis Museum on Main Street, as well as adjacent and additional structures to this museum. Nat Hart Davis was a famous district judge during the Montgomery era as the backbone of the region. Some of the other structures supported by the company include the Old Baptist Church, the Post Office and Pharmacy as well as the historic Addison-Gandy House.

This is a small sample of the intrigue and excitement surrounding the presidency of the Montgomery Historical Society. This is a big business that suits Billy Ray, a 1960 Montgomery High graduate after a years-long adventure picking cotton at $ 2.50 / hundred pound, a day’s work for a young boy. Billy Ray used the money to buy his school clothes and other items, before moving to Houston for a time to work for a brokerage firm specializing in cotton.

Montgomery, history and Billy Ray Duncan, remarkable man, famous town, famous historical society, all the historical wonders of our county.

Dr. Robin Montgomery is a native of Montgomery County and historian, retired professor, author and columnist for The Courier.


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2 African-American monuments in the Chicago area received national grants, including the South Side Church which hosted Emmett Till’s funeral http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/2-african-american-monuments-in-the-chicago-area-received-national-grants-including-the-south-side-church-which-hosted-emmett-tills-funeral/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/2-african-american-monuments-in-the-chicago-area-received-national-grants-including-the-south-side-church-which-hosted-emmett-tills-funeral/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 00:34:20 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/2-african-american-monuments-in-the-chicago-area-received-national-grants-including-the-south-side-church-which-hosted-emmett-tills-funeral/ CHICAGO (WLS) – The African-American Cultural Heritage Action Fund has awarded $ 3 million in grants to preserve 40 African-American monuments across the country, including two in the Chicago area. The church that hosted Emmett Till’s funeral, Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ on the South Side of Chicago, will receive $ 150,000. The […]]]>
CHICAGO (WLS) – The African-American Cultural Heritage Action Fund has awarded $ 3 million in grants to preserve 40 African-American monuments across the country, including two in the Chicago area.

The church that hosted Emmett Till’s funeral, Roberts Temple Church of God in Christ on the South Side of Chicago, will receive $ 150,000.

The 14-year-old from Chicago was killed by a white mob for allegedly hissing at a white woman while visiting relatives in Mississippi in 1955.

Till was the cousin of Marvel’s husband McCain Parker. She said the grant money will be used for structural repairs.

“We certainly want to preserve the memory and legacy of Emmett Till,” said McCain Parker, management consultant for the project.

The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is a program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

“The Action Fund was created in the aftermath of Charlottesville and it was an opportunity for the National Trust to demonstrate the power of historic preservation as a tool of racial equity and justice,” said Brent Leggs , executive director of the fund.

The Robbins Historical Society and Museum in Robbins receives $ 80,000 from the fund. The Historical Society and Museum are restoring SB Fuller’s former home into their future home. At one point, Fuller owned the largest black-owned business in the country, which included a cosmetics line and newspapers.

“We struggled to find ways to raise funds to open it so that we could set up our museum there,” said Tryone Haymore, executive director of the Robbins Historical Society.

McCain Parker says the goal is to eventually turn Roberts Temple Church into a museum.

“One of the things about preserving history is that forgotten history is sometimes repeated,” she said.

Copyright © 2021 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.


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Scituate Historical Society receives grant from Mass Culture Council http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/scituate-historical-society-receives-grant-from-mass-culture-council/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/scituate-historical-society-receives-grant-from-mass-culture-council/#respond Wed, 14 Jul 2021 14:59:00 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/scituate-historical-society-receives-grant-from-mass-culture-council/ The Scituate Historical Society announced that it had received a grant of $ 2,500 from the Mass Cultural Council, a state agency, as part of the Council’s projects program. To be named a recipient of a Mass Culture Council grant is an honor, recognizing that the Scituate Historical Society provides significant public value through its […]]]>

The Scituate Historical Society announced that it had received a grant of $ 2,500 from the Mass Cultural Council, a state agency, as part of the Council’s projects program.

To be named a recipient of a Mass Culture Council grant is an honor, recognizing that the Scituate Historical Society provides significant public value through its programs and services.

A few years ago, the Society celebrated its 100th anniversary. During this time, its goal has been to provide an assortment of opportunities for individuals and families to learn about the remarkable people and events that shaped Scituate and the South Shore. These opportunities include the maintenance and interpretation of 13 historic sites, including the Maritime and Irish Mossing Museum. The Society oversees a research and genealogy library and archives of collections that serve the community and researchers nationwide. In addition, the Society organizes series of lectures and special events in the city, offers extensive excursions and programs to hundreds of schoolchildren every year.


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Old York Historical Society offers walking tour Slavery in York County http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/old-york-historical-society-offers-walking-tour-slavery-in-york-county/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/old-york-historical-society-offers-walking-tour-slavery-in-york-county/#respond Tue, 13 Jul 2021 09:08:35 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/old-york-historical-society-offers-walking-tour-slavery-in-york-county/ YORK, Maine – Jacob Perkins of Wells appeared in court in January 1731 for striking a man enslaved to him, Tom, on the head with an ax as Tom was going about his work in the commons one afternoon. An Old York Historical Society researcher who oversees court records doesn’t know what became of Tom […]]]>

YORK, Maine – Jacob Perkins of Wells appeared in court in January 1731 for striking a man enslaved to him, Tom, on the head with an ax as Tom was going about his work in the commons one afternoon.

An Old York Historical Society researcher who oversees court records doesn’t know what became of Tom or whether he survived Perkins’ attack. Researchers often hit a wall when digging for more information about enslaved people in New England, a population that has largely been excluded from history books or minimized as an insignificant footnote, said Historical Society Perkins Fellow Erin Tewksbury.

As a reader, you’re left wanting more details, Tewksbury continued, which is what inspired her to create the first in-depth collection of York County’s court records into an online database with every person cited from 1648 throughout the colonial era.

Official documents of New England slaves are hard to come by, Tewksbury said, which is why a collection of all the names that passed through the Old York Gaol, a former colonial prison, may provide a narrow window into the reality of slavery in the early days of the Massachusetts Province of Maine.

Perkins was ultimately fined three shillings for the ax-wielding crime against his slave and was later fined five shillings at the same court for swearing, according to documents obtained by Tewksbury. This is just one of many instances Tewksbury found underscoring how enslaved people in New England were treated with contempt.


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Five historical societies and museums in the region received grants through the State Historical Foundation http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/five-historical-societies-and-museums-in-the-region-received-grants-through-the-state-historical-foundation/ http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/five-historical-societies-and-museums-in-the-region-received-grants-through-the-state-historical-foundation/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 15:42:25 +0000 http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/five-historical-societies-and-museums-in-the-region-received-grants-through-the-state-historical-foundation/ The Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation (NSHSF) today announced grant recipients for its new statewide grants program. Recipients in 18 counties across the state will receive a grant totaling $ 15,605. The list includes the Custer County Historical Society in Broken Bow, the Seven Valleys Historical Society in Callaway, the Thomas County Historical Society in […]]]>

The Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation (NSHSF) today announced grant recipients for its new statewide grants program. Recipients in 18 counties across the state will receive a grant totaling $ 15,605. The list includes the Custer County Historical Society in Broken Bow, the Seven Valleys Historical Society in Callaway, the Thomas County Historical Society in Thedford, the Robert Henri Museum in Cozad, and the Gothenburg Historical Museum in Gothenburg.

“It was a pleasure to read these apps and find out what legacy organizations are doing across the state”, said Trixie Smith, president of the NSHSF. “This program gives the Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation the knowledge and background to meet the needs of organizations that work diligently to preserve their local history.”

The NSHSF received 98 grant applications requesting more than $ 1.2 million to address needs such as collections conservation, public programming, outreach, exhibits, promotion of the facility and services, promotion of tourism and sightseeing, school programs and classroom resources, collection management and building preservation.

“This grant will have a lasting impact on our Foundation and will influence how students in the State of Nebraska learn about the pioneer women of our State,” said Bonnie Drake, vice president of the Bess Streeter Aldrich Foundation. “We will use our grant to develop a program that teachers can use with A Lantern in Her Hand, a novel that describes the classic story of Nebraska pioneer women, written by Bess Streeter Aldrich. This is something that we have been hoping to accomplish for years and thanks to the statewide grant program, we can finally make it a reality.

The Statewide Grants Program was developed in July 2020 to meet a funding need from local historical and educational organizations in Nebraska. With an initial donation from the Dillon Foundation as well as donations from many people, the NSHSF was able to award $ 15,605 for these first year grants. Grants from this program help organizations such as museums, historical societies, and libraries with education, preservation, and interpretation programs based on community history.

“We are extremely grateful to our donors who made these grants possible”, said Leslie Fattig, executive director of the Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation. “We were overwhelmed by the number of applications and the overall needs of local historic organizations and libraries across the state. COVID-19 was and still is a very difficult time for many of these organizations, and many are run by volunteers. We are excited to be able to help these invaluable organizations achieve their goals and we are excited to continue the statewide grant program in the future.

The NSHSF plans to expand the statewide grant program over the next several years to a million dollar fund and offer two rounds of grants per year.

Donate or find out more about the NSHSF Statewide Grants Program here: https://www.nshsf.org/statewide-grants-program/

About the Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation

The Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation raises funds to support the cause of history, including History Nebraska projects. The Foundation solicits funds and support from individuals and organizations across the state and beyond, who value Nebraska’s unique heritage and wish to play a personal role in ensuring that Nebraska’s history is accessible to generations. futures.


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