Historical Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Wed, 18 May 2022 09:08:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Historical Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Give a good brush to history https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/give-a-good-brush-to-history/ Wed, 18 May 2022 09:08:23 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/give-a-good-brush-to-history/ PRAIRIE GROVE – One of the projects undertaken by the Prairie Grove Historical Society is to care for the headstones in the historic section of Prairie Grove Cemetery. The local historical society sponsored a preservation project at the cemetery in April and the organization hopes to clean the headstones twice a year, in the spring […]]]>

PRAIRIE GROVE – One of the projects undertaken by the Prairie Grove Historical Society is to care for the headstones in the historic section of Prairie Grove Cemetery.

The local historical society sponsored a preservation project at the cemetery in April and the organization hopes to clean the headstones twice a year, in the spring and fall, according to society member Aaron Carter.

“We’re a historical society. We’re here to preserve history, so we decided to come here,” Carter said as he volunteered on a Saturday with other society members and some who came from come forward to help with the project.

Bob Young of the Washington County Historic Preservation Group provided instructions for volunteers on how to clean historic headstones.

First, workers rinse the tombstone thoroughly with water, and should always keep the stone wet when cleaning. The stone is then sprayed with D/2 Biological Solution, a cleaner recommended for restoration projects. The solution is to let it sit for 10-15 minutes, then volunteers use a plastic bristle brush and scrub as needed to further clean the headstone.

The tombstone is again rinsed thoroughly and then sprayed again with the D/2 solution.

Young said the solution will continue to work on the stone for several weeks. It seeps into the masonry and continues to remove biological products that have migrated below the surface of the stone. Eventually, it will be washed away by rainwater, Young said.

There are several things workers should not do when cleaning historic headstones. They should not use homemade cleaners or cleaners with bleach or any other household cleaner. Metals, such as wire brushes and wire scrapers, should not be used to clean stones.

Young said Washington County has 13 cemeteries on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Prairie Grove Cemetery Historic Section, with 300 to 400 cemeteries in the county.

The county preservation group provides cleaning kits to organizations that want to help preserve headstones.

“We offer this to any cemetery that goes on a cleanup day,” Young said. “We just ask them to reimburse us for any solution used.”

If you are interested in cleaning headstones, contact Bob Young at 505-690-5289.


LYNN KUTTER BUSINESS LEADER Aaron Carter of Prairie Grove cleans this headstone in the historic section of Prairie Grove Cemetery. Carter and his wife, Deanne Carter, are both members of the Prairie Grove Historical Society.



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BUSINESS LEADER LYNN KUTTER Samantha Stark, Amelia Wise and Sully Sanford, seniors at Haas Hall Academy in Fayetteville, clean headstones in the historic Prairie Grove Cemetery. The students saw a Facebook post about gravestone cleaning and decided to volunteer for the day.


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Students enjoy history lessons at Allison Deaver House | Community https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/students-enjoy-history-lessons-at-allison-deaver-house-community/ Mon, 16 May 2022 17:23:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/students-enjoy-history-lessons-at-allison-deaver-house-community/ Sophomores from Pisgah Forest Elementary spent time at the Allison Deaver House last week cracking beans, shelling corn and learning what life was like in Transylvania County 200 years ago. “I’ve wanted to do this for a long time,” said Rebecca Suddeth, director and program coordinator of the Transylvania Heritage Museum. “When Melony Hipps contacted […]]]>

Sophomores from Pisgah Forest Elementary spent time at the Allison Deaver House last week cracking beans, shelling corn and learning what life was like in Transylvania County 200 years ago.

“I’ve wanted to do this for a long time,” said Rebecca Suddeth, director and program coordinator of the Transylvania Heritage Museum. “When Melony Hipps contacted me to bring the classes to Silvermont and I couldn’t find the necessary volunteers, I called Marjorie Lillard, president of the Transylvania County Historical Society, and asked if they would accept to partner with us to host a program at the Allison. Deaver House instead.”

Before COVID, classes had visited Silvermont, the 1917 colonial revival mansion in downtown Brevard. These field trips focused on the lives of the Silversteen family and the impact Silversteen Industries has had on Transylvania’s economy. Students learned about leather making and notebooks, table manners, etiquette and were able to sing along with Adelaide Silversteen in the music room.

The program at Allison Deaver House was similarly structured, with small groups of students rotating through various activity stations. They learned about farm life, household chores, cooking, and the amount of work it takes to clothe a family. They heard stories, played old games and went on a treasure hunt.

“It was a remarkable experience for our students to see and compare how people live now and then in our area,” said Claire O’Connor.

“The Allison Deaver House is a great little pocket of history in our backyard,” added Jenny Victory.

“We want to see Pisgah Forest Elementary back here next spring,” Lillard said. “And the invitation is open to all other educators – public schools, private schools, home schools and scout groups. Let us know when you want to come.”

“Spring is the perfect time to visit the Allison Deaver House,” Suddeth said. “Fall is a great time to visit Silvermont. These two historic properties offer unique experiences that all educators should take advantage of.”

To schedule a student group visit to Silvermont or the Allison Deaver House, contact Rebecca Suddeth at curator@transylvaniaheritage.org. To schedule a personal tour of the Allison Deaver House, visit www.chistoricalsociety.com.

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Dixon City Council to consider process to name Town Center Square – The Vacaville Reporter https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/dixon-city-council-to-consider-process-to-name-town-center-square-the-vacaville-reporter/ Sat, 14 May 2022 23:09:32 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/dixon-city-council-to-consider-process-to-name-town-center-square-the-vacaville-reporter/ The new square in downtown Dixon was officially opened on May 4, bringing a stage show, picnic tables, lawn and an all-encompassing community gathering place to what was a gravel lot for several decades. . What this new plaza doesn’t have is an official name, and the city will begin the process of choosing a […]]]>

The new square in downtown Dixon was officially opened on May 4, bringing a stage show, picnic tables, lawn and an all-encompassing community gathering place to what was a gravel lot for several decades. .

What this new plaza doesn’t have is an official name, and the city will begin the process of choosing a name and selecting artwork at Tuesday’s city council meeting.

While the plaza was called Pardi Market Plaza during the planning stages, in honor of the grocery store that occupied the site of South First and East A Streets for more than 40 years, the city appears to be looking at other options for nouns. According to a report from City Attorney Doug White’s staff, the council will accept suggestions from the public, which will be submitted to the city’s public information officer, Madeline Henry, at mhenry@cityofdixon.us. The deadline for submission is July 31.

After the deadline, the council will hold a community meeting to receive public input and consider possible names for the plaza. After the meeting, the council will choose an official name for the place at its own discretion.

The board will also review artwork for the wall behind the stage, which will consist of artwork of famous Dixon landmarks chosen by the Dixon Historical Society and ultimately approved by the board.

“Artwork chosen by the Dixon Historical Society should reflect the city and the history of the city over the years,” White wrote.

The resolution before the board would also override a resolution previously approved by the board to name the stage after Jon Pardi, a descendant of the original owners of Pardi Market and a graduate of Dixon High School in 2003 who found success in Nashville as a country singer. . In December, the council voted narrowly to name the scene after Pardi, with Mayor Steve Bird and Councilman Don Hendershot voting against. In particular, Bird felt that naming the scene after a member of the Pardi family was redundant since the plaza was already to be named after the Pardis and wanted to emphasize other aspects of Dixon’s story.

In other business, council will consider a resolution approving the engineer’s report for the Dixon Lighting and Landscaping Maintenance District on a preliminary basis.

The board will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at City Hall, 600 EA St. The meeting can also be viewed online at Cityofdixon.us/MeetingAgendasMinutesVideos.

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Marathon County Historical Society Celebrates Preservation Month with Weekend of Events https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/marathon-county-historical-society-celebrates-preservation-month-with-weekend-of-events/ Thu, 12 May 2022 22:05:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/marathon-county-historical-society-celebrates-preservation-month-with-weekend-of-events/ WAUSAU, Wis. (WSAW) – May is Conservation Month in Wisconsin. To mark the month, the Marathon County Historical Society is hosting several events to help people relive the past. Jane Janke and Kathy Volkmann with the Historical Society stopped by NewsChannel 7 to 4 to share what they have planned for the celebration. On Saturday, […]]]>

WAUSAU, Wis. (WSAW) – May is Conservation Month in Wisconsin.

To mark the month, the Marathon County Historical Society is hosting several events to help people relive the past.

Jane Janke and Kathy Volkmann with the Historical Society stopped by NewsChannel 7 to 4 to share what they have planned for the celebration.

On Saturday, the Marathon County Historical Society will host an event called ‘House full of history.’ The event will take place on Saturday, May 14 at the Woodson Historical Center from 1 to 4 p.m. The event will offer the public the chance to experience some of the artifacts normally kept behind closed doors.

All ages are welcome at the event.

Also on Saturday, Author Janet Newman will visit the Woodson Historical Center to discuss his new book, Letters from Clara: the travels of an intrepid woman on the eve of war, 1936-1939.

Newman will be at the Woodson Historical Center from 2-3:30 p.m.

Copies of his book will be available for purchase and signing.

Finally, on Sunday, a walking tour called “Tales Between Two Depots” will take attendees past seven of Wausau’s most historic buildings.

Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at any stop.

Tour locations include:

  • Hiawatha Train Depot (now Timekeepers), 720 Grant Street
  • Hiawatha Restaurant and Lounge, 731 Grant St.
  • Unitarian Universalist Church, 504 Grant Street
  • Stewart Inn, 521 Grant Street
  • Wausau Club (now Wausau Museum of Contemporary Art), 309 McClellan Street
  • Landmark Hotel Tower New Apartments (now Landmark Apartments and Shops), 221 Scott Street
  • Wausau Railroad Depot (formerly Billy Moy’s Restaurant and Bates Legal Services), 209 Washington Street

Participants can stop at the different locations in any order between noon and 4 p.m. on Sunday.

Click here to learn more about any of these events or other upcoming events hosted by the Marathon County Historical Society.

Copyright 2022 WSAW. All rights reserved.

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Is Seymour the home of the burger? Find out on the show “Messy History” https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/is-seymour-the-home-of-the-burger-find-out-on-the-show-messy-history/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:00:28 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/is-seymour-the-home-of-the-burger-find-out-on-the-show-messy-history/ SEYMOUR – Smile Charlie’s Burgeryou are on a new Discovery+ series, “Messy History of American Cooking”. The city hosted a video team in 2021 burger party to give them a taste of how Charlie Nagreen created this beloved American food. Seymour’s claim to be the birthplace of the burger came up during research for the […]]]>

SEYMOUR – Smile Charlie’s Burgeryou are on a new Discovery+ series, “Messy History of American Cooking”.

The city hosted a video team in 2021 burger party to give them a taste of how Charlie Nagreen created this beloved American food.

Seymour’s claim to be the birthplace of the burger came up during research for the show, said Chad Gajadhar, the co-executive producer. After visiting the Burger Fest website, he said, “We knew straight away we wanted to visit.”

“We wanted to capture America’s love of the burger and the nostalgia that comes with it,” Gajadhar said. “A small town festival celebrating the origins of the burger really encapsulates that Americana vibe. It was exactly what we were looking for.”

The local canon says Nagreen was selling meatballs at the 1885 Seymour Fair when he mashed the meat between two pieces of bread to make it easier for visitors to eat and called it a hamburger.

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Mike Spratt talks about the New Brighton Historical Society https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/mike-spratt-talks-about-the-new-brighton-historical-society/ Mon, 09 May 2022 01:04:56 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/mike-spratt-talks-about-the-new-brighton-historical-society/ (Matt Drzik/Beaver County Radio) Making history, collecting history, reinventing history… if it has to do with history, then it’s on the list for the New Brighton Historical Society. Mike Spratt joined Matt Drzik on the May 6 edition of AM Beaver County to talk about the NBHS, an organization that has preserved the borough’s decades-long […]]]>

(Matt Drzik/Beaver County Radio)

Making history, collecting history, reinventing history… if it has to do with history, then it’s on the list for the New Brighton Historical Society.

Mike Spratt joined Matt Drzik on the May 6 edition of AM Beaver County to talk about the NBHS, an organization that has preserved the borough’s decades-long history. “There are probably over 1,000 different pieces,” Spratt said of the number of pieces in New Brighton’s history, which he says arrive from all different parts of the world.

One of the largest projects currently managed by the Historical Society is the renovation and restoration of the Townsend Irish House; a project with more than a century of history behind it. Spratt says the intention of the NBHS is to turn Irish-Townsend House into a gathering place for future events and meetings, including those of the Historical Society itself.

For now, the NBHS meets monthly at Westminster Presbyterian Church in New Brighton at 7:00 p.m. on the last Tuesday of the month. Meetings are open to the public and citizens can become members by paying a membership fee of $25/month.

To listen to the full interview, click on the player below!

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SF Chinatown museum reopens with a punch and a kick – NBC Bay Area https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/sf-chinatown-museum-reopens-with-a-punch-and-a-kick-nbc-bay-area/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:22:16 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/sf-chinatown-museum-reopens-with-a-punch-and-a-kick-nbc-bay-area/ When the Chinese Historical Society museum opened in San Francisco’s Chinatown in late April for the first time in two years, it caused a stir. The museum has reopened with a powerful exhibit on the life of Chinatown’s most famous native son, martial arts master and actor Bruce Lee, who was born a block from […]]]>

When the Chinese Historical Society museum opened in San Francisco’s Chinatown in late April for the first time in two years, it caused a stir.

The museum has reopened with a powerful exhibit on the life of Chinatown’s most famous native son, martial arts master and actor Bruce Lee, who was born a block from the Chinese Hospital.

But after a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, the museum also opened with a karate chop to its own mission statement, expanding its historical panorama to include other nationalities.

“We took it upon ourselves,” said the museum’s new director, Justin Hoover, “to reimagine what the museum could be.”

The “reinvention” of the museum took the form of physical changes; from expanding exhibit ceilings, to adding state-of-the-art projection equipment, to taking over an adjacent parking lot to host community events.

But his rebirth is also something of a spiritual transformation.

In the days leading up to the museum’s reopening in April, artists and workers were busy putting the finishing touches on exhibits that showed the brick building’s expanded cultural perspective. Downstairs in a lower room, an African-American artist painted a scene that included a young black girl alongside an Asian-inspired caricature of a dragon.

Another wall featured three paintings of first female Black Panther Tarica Lewis, depicting one of her ancestors, legendary boxer Joe Lewis.

“It’s also a pivot to inclusiveness of non-Asians,” Hoover said, browsing the exhibits between meetings. “We have a lot of African American voices, a lot of artist voices from all walks of life.”

The museum still focuses on its mission of highlighting the history and experience of Chinese immigrants in Chinatown, which dates back to the Gold Rush era. In one room, behind glass, was a dark symbol of this immigrant story; the original 1902 document making the Chinese Exclusion Act permanent, and the pen used by President Theodore Roosevelt to sign it.

Hoover explained how the room where the document is located is also a place where people can practice empathy – including an instruction to write an “inclusiveness” message on a notecard.

“Who could you help? Who could you support? Hoover said, offering suggestions.

Visitors entering the museum will be most impressed by its front and center Bruce Lee exhibit – featuring film memorabilia, images, Lee quotes and a state-of-the-art colorful light projection that bathes Lee in morphing visuals.

Joe Rosato Jr./NBC Bay Area

A visual projection illuminates Bruce Lee in the recently opened exhibit at the Chinese Historical Society Museum in San Francisco’s Chinatown after a two-year closure. (May 6, 2022)

A section of the exhibit focuses on the racism Lee has faced throughout his career, including a list of Green Hornet salaries, in which Lee starred as Kato, receiving the lowest salary in the production.

“Bruce did less than anyone on set, even the stuntmen,” Hoover said. “He was paid less than anyone, yet he was the star of that TV show.”

On the day of the exhibit’s opening, Lee’s daughter, Shannon Lee, toured the room filled with artifacts, while videos from her father’s films played her father’s martial arts scenes and the Images of the late actor were shown from all angles.

“There’s a sense of wonder, there’s a sense of pride,” Lee said looking around the room, “there’s a sense of energy, a sense of satisfaction, and a sense of excitement. ‘be here.”

The pandemic has hit Chinatown hard, as businesses are still struggling to recover. The museum’s long closure seemed to reflect the neighborhood’s grim economic situation, as its streets remained empty for more than a year. With street banners now trumpeting the Lee exhibit, there’s hope it will give the neighborhood’s recovery a quick kick.

“Chinatown has been disproportionately affected by the pandemic in terms of declining business,” said activist Natassia Kwan. “And it’s super exciting to see the excitement surrounding this exhibit – bringing this renewed energy to Chinatown.”

Hoover, who was hired as director a year ago, is excited to see what the future holds for the museum — and its role as a cultural hub for the famous San Francisco neighborhood.

“I feel like this museum is just an anchor in the community,” Hoover said. “People have looked to it for many years to be a leader not only in education but also in the community.”

Hoover stopped in front of a broken wooden sign reading “No Chinese or Dogs Allowed”, which Lee smashed in the movie Fists of Fury. Likewise, visitors are now invited to write their own message of oppression on a board and smash it with a karate chop.

Hoover scribbled “fake news” on a board, then smashed it in half, shouting “karate kick!” when the blow was struck.

“Come in and you can do your karate kick,” he laughed. “It’s the only museum where you can break things.”

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Williamsburgh Historical Society hosts speaker in conjunction with exhibit https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/williamsburgh-historical-society-hosts-speaker-in-conjunction-with-exhibit/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:38:09 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/williamsburgh-historical-society-hosts-speaker-in-conjunction-with-exhibit/ The Williamsburgh Historical Society hosted journalist and author Claudia Smith Brinson on April 30 to speak as part of the Smithsonian’s traveling exhibit, Voices and Votes – Democracy in America, which will be in the Society’s African American Archives, adjacent to the museum, until May 28. Introducing Brinson to a small group gathered in the […]]]>

The Williamsburgh Historical Society hosted journalist and author Claudia Smith Brinson on April 30 to speak as part of the Smithsonian’s traveling exhibit, Voices and Votes – Democracy in America, which will be in the Society’s African American Archives, adjacent to the museum, until May 28.

Introducing Brinson to a small group gathered in the auditorium of Williamsburg Technical College, the company’s vice president, Margaret Chandler, noted that the spectacular exhibit begins with this country’s founders taking “great leaps of faith.” , then explores how those who came after them took their own “big leaps” to make democracy work better for each succeeding generation. Chandler said Brinson in his book, Stories of Struggle: The Civil Rights Conflict in South Carolina, takes an in-depth look at one of these “great leaps of faith”.

Brinson, who worked as a journalist for 33 years, noted that when she was a young reporter at the state, she found that the life stories of black people she interviewed were very different from the stories told to her by white people. For example, she said, she had never read anything in The state on Briggs vs. Elliott, a 1947 lawsuit in Clarendon County by 20 black families from the Summerton area demanding that the school district provide a bus so their children would not have to walk nine miles to attend Scott’s Branch School. Although a three-judge panel in South Carolina ruled against the plaintiffs, the case became one of five cases litigated in the United States Supreme Court under the caption Brown v. Board of Educationa landmark case in which judges ordered the desegregation of all public schools in the United States.

When Brinson became interested in Briggs, three of the women who signed the petition still lived in Summerton. They had never told their story to anyone, not even to other family members. They cried while talking to him because they realized that their time on earth was getting shorter and shorter, and if they didn’t tell their stories, those stories of those important events would die with them. She said they trusted her because they saw that in other stories she wrote, she approached them with an open heart and an open mind. “I would come to them with an open mind and a box of tissues,” Brinson said. “We often cried together” as the stories unfolded.

Attorney Thurgood Marshall was consulted and worried about the consequences he knew the families would suffer, he suggested they give up the fight. But they were adamant. Marshall, who later served as an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, was correct in his concern. Every person who signed the petition lost their job. Many of them eventually left the state so their children could get a better education. J. Waties Waring, the white judge of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of South Carolina, sided with the petitioners. As a result of this and other pro-civil rights rulings, he was ostracized by other white Charlestonians and had rocks thrown through his windows, while the Ku Klux Klan burned a cross in his yard. He too eventually left South Carolina.

Brinson noted that the families didn’t give up even though they were aware of what lay ahead. She said that while working on stories about Briggs vs. Elliott and while writing her book, she met some of the greatest people. “They weren’t angry; they all felt that they had done all they could to advance civil rights a little.

The story of Briggs vs. Elliott is just one local example of the many “leaps of faith” that are part of our ever-evolving democracy.

Brinson’s lecture was co-sponsored by the South Carolina Humanities Council. Voices and Votes – Democracy in America is part of the Smithsonian Institution’s Museums on Main Street program. Kingstree is the traveling exhibit’s first stop in South Carolina. Visit the exhibit at the African American Archives, 127 Hampton Avenue in Kingstree. It is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. until May 26 and on Saturdays May 7 and 28 from noon to 4 p.m. Call 843-355-3303 for more information.


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Peña Adobe Historical Society Celebrates “Western Day at Adobe”! – https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pena-adobe-historical-society-celebrates-western-day-at-adobe/ Mon, 02 May 2022 20:38:31 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/pena-adobe-historical-society-celebrates-western-day-at-adobe/ This May 7 open house event will feature performances by the Congressional Gunfighters of America, a professional stunt troupe! The re-enactment group is dedicated to preserving old western history, specializing in live entertainment. They use period costumes and weapons. Before the pandemic, they performed at historic “Old Town” events, train robberies, rodeos, state fairs and […]]]>

This May 7 open house event will feature performances by the Congressional Gunfighters of America, a professional stunt troupe! The re-enactment group is dedicated to preserving old western history, specializing in live entertainment. They use period costumes and weapons. Before the pandemic, they performed at historic “Old Town” events, train robberies, rodeos, state fairs and specialty events. Some club members have appeared in movies and TV shows!

In addition to the gunfighters, the music will be provided by the Vacaville Acoustic Jammers, led by Terry and Leslie Cloper. Jammers sing and play various instruments, including guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle and harmonica.

La Peña Adobe is the oldest fully restored structure in Solano County. The adobe was built in 1842 by Juan Felipe Peña after he and Juan Manuel Vaca arrived from the New Mexico area. Adobe tours led by Cecelia Peña and Darlene Stewart, 5th generation descendants of the Peña family, will be available throughout the day. Native American Park Guides Armando Perez and James Tunstall will speak to park visitors about Native Americans who lived here before the Peñas and Vacas arrived in the Lagoon Valley.

The park is also home to the Mowers-Goheen Museum, with its artifacts from the area’s settlement, as well as the Willis Linn Jepson Memorial Garden and the Indian Council Ground. Fun activities for the kids will include an old fashioned potato sack race and learning to tie up cattle!

Peña Adobe Regional Park is located in scenic Lagoon Valley off Interstate 80 to the left of the Lagoon Valley Park entrance. This event is free! For questions, call (707) 447-0518. If you are passionate about local history and are interested in tours, volunteering, or more information, email us at penaadobe@gmail.com.

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Waste District, ASAP collects prescription drugs | News, Sports, Jobs https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/waste-district-asap-collects-prescription-drugs-news-sports-jobs/ Sun, 01 May 2022 05:07:26 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/waste-district-asap-collects-prescription-drugs-news-sports-jobs/ MEDICATION TAKE BACK EVENT: The Geauga-Trumbull Solid Waste Management District has partnered with the Alliance for the Prevention of Substance Abuse to host a Medication Take Back Event from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Trumbull Collection Facility, 5138 Enterprise Blvd., Warren. Residents may bring in expired, unwanted, or unused prescription medications […]]]>

MEDICATION TAKE BACK EVENT: The Geauga-Trumbull Solid Waste Management District has partnered with the Alliance for the Prevention of Substance Abuse to host a Medication Take Back Event from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday at the Trumbull Collection Facility, 5138 Enterprise Blvd., Warren. Residents may bring in expired, unwanted, or unused prescription medications for law enforcement officials to destroy. Participants are asked to keep medications in their original containers, which will be recycled.

The program is free, open only to residents of Geauga and Trumbull counties, and will take place rain or shine. In addition to the drug take-back program, the facility will also be open to accept electronics, appliances and household hazardous waste. For more information, call the office at 330-675-2673.

MORNING IN UPTON: “Morning at the Upton” will feature Elizabeth Cole Clark with a presentation on First Lady Lou Hoover and her husband Herbert Wednesday at 10 a.m. at Upton House, 380 Mahoning Ave. NW to Warren. For more information, call 330-395-1840 or www.uptonhouse.org.

FANTASY FESTIVAL AT FAIRGROUNDS: The Northeast Ohio Fantasy Festival will be held Friday, Saturday and May 8 at the Trumbull County Fairgrounds, Everett Hull Road, Cortland.

The festival will feature artisans and merchants, knights in battle, music filling the alleys, food fit for a king, and quests for all ages. Choose to quest throughout the village, meet merchants, solve puzzles, test your strength and prove yourself a worthy champion of the Ironwyrd realm.

PRAYER EVENT: A National Day of Prayer Prayer Breakfast will be held Thursday at 7 a.m. at the Jericho Center, 2878 Warren Meadville Road, Cortland. The cost is $10 per person at the door. RSVP to Ndavid1234@hotmail.com or Pastordan1954@gmail.com or text 330-883-6620.

MUSEUM OPEN FOR MOTHER’S DAY: Mother’s Day, May 8, will be the first open house of 2022 for the Barnhisel House and Museum of the Girard Historical Society, 1011 N. State St., Girard. The historic 10-room Greek Revival-style house, dating from around 1840, has been restored by the Girard Historical Society. Built at a time in history when most homes were log cabins, the two-story Barnhisel House, with its central floor plan, substantial woodwork and rear staircase for hired help, would have been considered like a mansion.

The house will be open from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on the second and fourth Sundays of each month.

DAY OF PRAYER: Hubbard Christians in Action will hold a National Day of Prayer Thursday noon at the Hubbard Administration Building, 220 W. Liberty St.

ASSOCIATION TO MEET: The Northwest Neighborhood Association will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday at Grace United Methodist Church, Drexel Avenue NW. Speakers are Marvin Donaldson, who will discuss bike safety, and Stacey and Erik Hoover from Cockeye Barbecue.

SUMMER YARD SALE: The Southington Community Park Group is accepting items for a summer yard sale, taking place August 4-7. All proceeds will be used for events at the gazebo. Items not accepted are those that are broken, have missing parts or are in poor condition. Call 330-847-0235 to donate.

THE AUXILIARY HOSTS TEA: The Howland American Legion Ladies Auxiliary will host a Spring Tea at 12:30 p.m. May 14 at Howland Senior Center, 8273 High St. There will be a program on how the Auxiliary serves veterans. The event will include speakers, a basket draw and a 50-50 draw. RSVP to Tina at 330-979-8842.

MASTER GARDENER PLANT SALE: The Trumbull County Master Gardeners will be holding their annual plant sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on May 14 at the Trumbull County Agricultural Center, 520 W. Main St., Cortland.

Club members will have favorite locally grown plants for sale, many straight from their own gardens. There will also be wildflowers, herbs and other varieties of plants. All proceeds go to maintaining the garden for the non-profit group.

For more information, contact Noelle Barnes at Barnes.1127@osu.edu or call her at 330-638-6783.



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