Preservation Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:58:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png Preservation Society – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 The 2022 Summit County Architectural Heritage Awards will be presented https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-2022-summit-county-architectural-heritage-awards-will-be-presented/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:58:33 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-2022-summit-county-architectural-heritage-awards-will-be-presented/ A brunch to honor the recipients of the 2022 Summit County Architectural Heritage Awards will be held at noon on Sunday, May 22 at the Trailhead at Cascade Lofts Event Center at 21 W. North St. in Akron. A joint project of the Summit County Historical Society and Progress Through Preservation, the awards recognize projects, […]]]>

A brunch to honor the recipients of the 2022 Summit County Architectural Heritage Awards will be held at noon on Sunday, May 22 at the Trailhead at Cascade Lofts Event Center at 21 W. North St. in Akron.

A joint project of the Summit County Historical Society and Progress Through Preservation, the awards recognize projects, individuals and organizations that celebrate and enhance the architectural significance and historic character of Akron and Summit County.

The cost of the brunch is $32 payable in cash or check at the door or through EventBrite. RSVP to Alice Christie at 330-864-8364 or achristie@malone.edu by 2 p.m. Thursday. May 19.

Recipients to be honored are Edward Werner House, United Building/BLU-tique Hotel, Robinson Mansion, Glendale Cemetery Bell Tower, Stan Hywet Stone Wall, John Barry House, Steve and Janet Little, John S. Knight House, Summit Land Bank, Hollow Grove, The Eller-Weiss House, 29 College St. in Hudson, 78 Ravenna Road in Hudson, Lichtenwalter School in Green, City of Green, and Gober-Zavodny House.

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Chickamauga Chapter NSDAR Members Attend State Conference and Receive Chapter Awards https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/chickamauga-chapter-nsdar-members-attend-state-conference-and-receive-chapter-awards/ Mon, 16 May 2022 15:04:19 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/chickamauga-chapter-nsdar-members-attend-state-conference-and-receive-chapter-awards/ Left to right, former Chapter Regent Susan Harris, Chapter Regent Gayle Burrows, Jane Hill and former Chapter Regent Carol Rogers Members of the First National Chattanooga Girls Society of the American Chapter, Chickamauga Chapter, attended a multi-day DAR Tennessee State Conference held in Franklin, Tennessee. At the conference, Chapter Regent Gayle Burrows received […]]]>


Left to right, former Chapter Regent Susan Harris, Chapter Regent Gayle Burrows, Jane Hill and former Chapter Regent Carol Rogers

Members of the First National Chattanooga Girls Society of the American Chapter, Chickamauga Chapter, attended a multi-day DAR Tennessee State Conference held in Franklin, Tennessee.

At the conference, Chapter Regent Gayle Burrows received more than 80 state awards on behalf of the 148 members of the Chickamauga Chapter for their volunteer service and educational work in more than 30 national NSDAR committees related to education, preservation history and patriotism. The chapter received first place among all Tennessee chapters with 100 or more members.

Former chapter regent Susan Harris received first place in Tennessee for her submission to the Americanism Committee’s Photo Contest on the topic: “What America Means to Me.”

The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is a women’s service organization whose members can trace their lineage to a person who helped secure American independence during the Revolutionary War. Today’s DAR is vibrant and diverse, with more than 185,000 members in 3,000 chapters in the United States and abroad. DAR members provide millions of hours of volunteer service each year to their local communities across the country and around the world. DAR chapters participate in projects to promote historic preservation, education, and patriotism. Over one million members have joined the organization since its founding in 1890.

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Carolyn C. Boykin, a retired clinical registered nurse who worked in the operating room, was also an avid golfer, Chesapeake Bay sailor and gardener, dies – Baltimore Sun https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/carolyn-c-boykin-a-retired-clinical-registered-nurse-who-worked-in-the-operating-room-was-also-an-avid-golfer-chesapeake-bay-sailor-and-gardener-dies-baltimore-sun/ Sun, 15 May 2022 09:00:47 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/carolyn-c-boykin-a-retired-clinical-registered-nurse-who-worked-in-the-operating-room-was-also-an-avid-golfer-chesapeake-bay-sailor-and-gardener-dies-baltimore-sun/ Carolyn C. Boykin, a retired Johns Hopkins Hospital registered clinical nurse and operating room nurse who was also an avid golfer, Chesapeake Bay sailor and gardener, died of natural causes on May 8 at his longtime home in Ruxton. She was 92 years old. “She was a wonderful nurse-supervisor who did everything for everyone and […]]]>

Carolyn C. Boykin, a retired Johns Hopkins Hospital registered clinical nurse and operating room nurse who was also an avid golfer, Chesapeake Bay sailor and gardener, died of natural causes on May 8 at his longtime home in Ruxton. She was 92 years old.

“She was a wonderful nurse-supervisor who did everything for everyone and set the standards and work ethic,” said plastic surgeon Dr. Paul N. Manson, who had served as chief of plastic surgery at Hopkins of 1990 to 2010. “She always organized everyone well, did the right thing and was a wonderfully reliable person.

The former Carolyn Ellicott Maccoun Croker, daughter of John Hanson Croker, Vice President and Chief Trustee of what was then known as Maryland National Bank, and his wife, Carolyn Ellicott Maccoun Croker, was born in Baltimore and grew up on Bolton Street in Bolton. Hill.

Growing up, Ms. Boykin, in order to reduce the risk of being exposed to polio, spent summers with her maternal grandparents in Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania.

A 1948 graduate of Garrison Forest School, she also made her Bachelors’ Cotillion debut that year.

She received her nursing degree in 1953 from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and began her nursing career with the Baltimore City Health Department as a staff nurse in its health care program.

After working part-time as a nurse from 1956 to 1957 at York Hospital in York, Pennsylvania, Ms Boykin joined the York County Tuberculosis & Health Society in 1955, where she worked until 1960.

She then worked at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 1968 to 1973 and joined the staff at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1992, where she became an operating room nurse at Nelson 2, specializing in breast implant removal and in vitro fertilization. She was also responsible for creating a surgical instrument inventory system for operating room surgeons.

Ms Boykin was thought to be possibly one of the oldest nurses to have worked at Hopkins, and when she turned 82 in 2012, “she updated her license”, said one daughter, Carolyn “Carol Croker Boykin, of Ruxton, and “From 1999 until 2012, when she retired, she worked one day a week in the operating room at Hopkins Weinberg.”

In 1953, she married Bernard Carter Boykin, a chemical engineer, who worked for her father who had bought the old Melvale distillery on West Cold Spring Lane in the 1930s, which produced rye whisky. They later established the American Cider and Vinegar Co. there, which made Melvale apple vinegar and Crystal distilled vinegar.

After the company was sold in the 1950s, Mr. Boykin entered the electronics business and founded Boykin Products, which later became Electro Tech. He retired in the mid-1980s.

Her husband passed on his love of sailing to his wife, and the couple, who had owned a Whitby 42, a 42-foot sailboat, formed the Whitby 42/Brewer Owners Association to locate parts and sails, and to keep theirs and other owners’ boats sailing.

They enjoyed sailing and exploring the Chesapeake Bay and were also active members of the Potapskut Sailing Association. They also liked to go on steamboat cruises.

After her husband’s death in 2011, Ms Boykin married Dr Francis Mann Clarke Jr., a general surgeon, whom she had dated before marrying her husband.

Both men were members of the Sons of the American Revolution, and after reading an obituary for her husband in the society’s newsletter, he contacted her, Ms Boykin said. They married in 2012 and he died three years later.

Interested in historic preservation, she had been a member of the Hammond-Harwood House Association in Annapolis and had served on its board of directors from 1973 to 1992. She had also been a member for nearly four decades of the Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage Inc., and had served as Recording Secretary, President and Executive Secretary from 1978 to 1992.

She was an accomplished golfer and began playing the sport as a teenager at Blue Ridge Summit where she hit her first hole-in-one. As a member of the Green Spring Valley Hunt Cup, Ms. Boykin had an eight handicap and was club champion in 1968.

Coached by legendary Baltimore golfer Carol Mann, Ms. Boykin received Golf Digest magazine’s Most Improved Golfer Award in 1966. She was also a longtime member and leader of the Women’s Golf Association of Baltimore.

A fan of Maryland steeplechase racing, she attended the Grand National Steeplechase Race at Butler in April, just weeks after her death, Ms Boykin said.

A regular daily walker, she could be observed walking twice a day in Circle Road in Ruxton until the age of 82, and she also shopped daily at Graul Market in Ruxton until the age of 87 years old. A dedicated Heineken Beer fan, she was rarely seen without her Heineken Beer ski cap.

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Ms Boykin, who loved the vegetable garden and also grew award-winning daffodils, was a member of the Home Gardeners’ Club and served as club president from 1982 to 1984.

Gifted with an outgoing personality and an easy smile, she loved throwing parties and was best known for her homemade buns that “guests stuffed into their pockets” as they left, her daughter said.

“She was outgoing and friendly, but was a little reserved,” Dr. Manson said.

In addition to the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club, she was a member of the Johns Hopkins Club and Chapter One of the Colonial Dames of America.

She was a longtime communicant of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Ruxton.

There are no interment services at the Ellicott Family Cemetery in Ellicott City.

In addition to her daughter, she is survived by another daughter, Elizabeth “Betsy” Whitehead Boykin of North Roland Park; one sister, Virginia “Ginny” Croker Easter of Cockeysville; and two grandsons. Another daughter, Roberta Maccoun Boykin, died in 2012.

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Royal Society names climatologist first Brazilian member since 1800s https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/royal-society-names-climatologist-first-brazilian-member-since-1800s/ Fri, 13 May 2022 16:57:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/royal-society-names-climatologist-first-brazilian-member-since-1800s/ SAO PAULO, May 13 (Reuters) – The Royal Society’s scientific academy has elected climatologist Carlos Nobre, a leading researcher studying the Amazon rainforest, as its first Brazilian member since the country’s emperor Dom Pedro II joined the group in the 1800s. Nobre has studied the Amazon for decades and was an early proponent of the […]]]>

SAO PAULO, May 13 (Reuters) – The Royal Society’s scientific academy has elected climatologist Carlos Nobre, a leading researcher studying the Amazon rainforest, as its first Brazilian member since the country’s emperor Dom Pedro II joined the group in the 1800s.

Nobre has studied the Amazon for decades and was an early proponent of the theory that rapid deforestation is pushing the world’s largest rainforest to a tipping point after which the biome could dry out into savannah.

“The Royal Society gives international recognition to the risks facing the Amazon,” Nobre told Reuters on Friday.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

“It’s a huge risk that we could lose the greatest biodiversity and the largest rainforest on the planet.”

Preserving the Amazon rainforest is key to curbing climate change because it absorbs a large amount of carbon dioxide.

Last year, Nobre led a group of about 200 researchers who launched a landmark report with the most detailed and comprehensive analysis to date of scientific knowledge of the Amazon rainforest. Read more

The Royal Society of Great Britain was founded in 1660 and is the oldest national scientific academy.

Nobel laureate Peter Medawar, a Brazilian-born British biologist, was also a former member, according to the Royal Society. But Medawar, who died in 1987, renounced his Brazilian nationality as a teenager.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Jake Spring; Editing by David Gregorio

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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The Vineyard Gazette – Martha’s Vineyard News https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 15:58:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ The West Tisbury Conservation Commission agreed on Tuesday to support the return of the Farmers’ Market to Martha’s Vineyard Agricultural Society for a third season this year, based on a new plan for the popular market that aims to reduce the effects of human and automobile traffic on the property with restricted conservation. In a […]]]>

The West Tisbury Conservation Commission agreed on Tuesday to support the return of the Farmers’ Market to Martha’s Vineyard Agricultural Society for a third season this year, based on a new plan for the popular market that aims to reduce the effects of human and automobile traffic on the property with restricted conservation.

In a letter to the commission last month, the agricultural society’s executive director, Lauren Lynch, proposed moving market vendors to the area used by vendors during the August fair, and moving the public parking lot from the hay field to the vendor parking lot and nearby sites that are not part of the Perpetual Agricultural Preservation Restriction (APR) that protects company land.

The Conservation Commission, which owns the APR jointly with the Vineyard Conservation Society, voted unanimously on Tuesday to sign a letter thanking Ms Lynch for her proposal.

“This is the kind of plan we were hoping for when VCS and the Conservation Commission jointly expressed their concerns. . . Testing the mitigation plan on a trial basis therefore makes sense,” the letter states, before proposing a voluntary parking donation and a car count and weather monitoring program.

Held online, the meeting drew more than three dozen pro-market attendees.

In the letter, the commission also pointed out that the rental of company facilities for agriculture-related events such as farmers’ markets is specifically included in the language of the RPA.

But the conservation commission does not have the last word.

In a separate step, the agricultural society also applied to the West Tisbury Zoning Appeals Board for a special permit to host the market at the fairgrounds. A hearing is scheduled for Thursday evening from 5:55 p.m. at West Tisbury Town Hall.

“We understand that you should always approach the ZBA. We do not intend to address the issue of zoning adequacy here,” the conservation commission said in its letter.

At Tuesday’s meeting, the conservation commission also voted to co-sign, with VCS, a letter to the ZBA asking that any special permit action taken by the council align with the farm conservation restriction.

“It prohibits detrimental uses of the property, while allowing commercial uses that are limited in nature and directly related to the agricultural purposes and educational function of the landowner MV Ag Society,” the letter reads in part.

Held for decades at Grange Hall on State Road, the farmers’ market received special permits to operate in the agricultural society during the pandemic summers of 2020 and 2021.

Market organizers and society now want to make the arrangement permanent, as it provides more retail and parking space and avoids scheduling conflicts with the heavily booked Grange Room.

Before the pandemic, there had been intermittent discussions for years about moving the market to the agricultural society grounds off Panhandle Road. The growing popularity of the market had caused traffic jams on Saturday mornings during the summer months, raising concerns about the impact on the quiet, rural nature of the village of West Tisbury. The town center is home to the Alley General Store and 7a Foods, the West Tisbury Congregational Church and the Field Gallery, in addition to the Town Hall and the Grange. But agreement on whether to make the move was elusive, including between market organizers and vendors.

The land of the agricultural society is located in a residential area. At Tuesday’s meeting, conservation commission chairman Whit Griswold said his board had received no correspondence opposing the request.

“I haven’t heard any protest from the goalscorers, and it’s now been broadcast enough that they’re aware of what’s going on,” Mr Griswold said.

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Palm Beach students raise awareness to protect our planet https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/palm-beach-students-raise-awareness-to-protect-our-planet/ Mon, 09 May 2022 09:12:42 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/palm-beach-students-raise-awareness-to-protect-our-planet/ The City of Palm Beach, along with the Preservation Foundation, Palm Beach Day Academy, and students from Palm Beach Public Schools, the Palm Beach Civic Association, Mounts Botanical Garden, and the Garden Club recently celebrated Earth Day. At the Mandel Recreation Center, Day Academy eighth-graders explained the work they’ve been doing since 2020 planting mangroves […]]]>

The City of Palm Beach, along with the Preservation Foundation, Palm Beach Day Academy, and students from Palm Beach Public Schools, the Palm Beach Civic Association, Mounts Botanical Garden, and the Garden Club recently celebrated Earth Day.

At the Mandel Recreation Center, Day Academy eighth-graders explained the work they’ve been doing since 2020 planting mangroves and oyster reef balls on Tarpon Cove, an island restoration site in the Intracoastal . The students explained how mangroves, native to Florida, provide habitat for more than 70% of marine animals, while filtering water and protecting our coasts from erosion.

During their trips to the island, the students also deployed Oyster Reef Balls, artificial reef models that mimic the structure and function of natural reefs, creating a habitat for the survival of oysters and other marine species. In case you are unaware of the value of oysters, these natural water purifiers remove nitrogen and sediment from our lagoon. When you consider that excess nitrogen is a major contributor to red and blue-green algae blooms, the work these kids are doing is invaluable.

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Local charity awards $73,000 to nonprofits in North Central Massachusetts https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/local-charity-awards-73000-to-nonprofits-in-north-central-massachusetts/ Sat, 07 May 2022 09:00:58 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/local-charity-awards-73000-to-nonprofits-in-north-central-massachusetts/ FITCHBURG — The Community Foundation for North Central Massachusetts, a Fitchburg-based public charity, has awarded $73,720 in grants targeting environmental preservation and animal welfare. Through the Community Foundation’s Environmental Conservation and Animal Welfare Grant Program, grants will be distributed to local nonprofit organizations in North Central Massachusetts. They will support long-term, viable initiatives in their […]]]>

FITCHBURG — The Community Foundation for North Central Massachusetts, a Fitchburg-based public charity, has awarded $73,720 in grants targeting environmental preservation and animal welfare.

Through the Community Foundation’s Environmental Conservation and Animal Welfare Grant Program, grants will be distributed to local nonprofit organizations in North Central Massachusetts. They will support long-term, viable initiatives in their respective communities that focus on “preserving and accessing the natural beauty” of the area and “improving the well-being of domestic animals”, according to the president of the association. Community Foundation, Stephen Adams.

“This year’s recipients are doing incredible things to help protect and promote the quality of life for people and animals across our region,” Adams said in a press release.

The largest grants, totaling $10,000, $10,000 and $7,500, went to the Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust, Gardner’s GAAMHA Inc. and the Groton Conservation Trust, respectively.

Funding to the Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust will help permanently protect 202 acres along the southwest shore of Tully Lake Athol and prevent degradation of the lake’s viewshed.

GAAMHA will use its grant to purchase hay for horses, goats and sheep from the Carl E. Dahl Home of Athol at Cass Farm. A treatment center for drug addiction and mental disorders, Cass Farm also serves as a home for livestock rescued from abandonment, neglect, abuse, malnutrition, poor health and slaughter.

The Groton Conservation Trust will use its grant to improve community access to the Bates-Blackman property. Funds would cover constructing an accessible parking spot, restoring grasslands with native grasses and wildflowers, building grass trails through the grasslands, improving the safety of an existing trail and benches to sit on.

10 smaller grants were also awarded: The Nashua River Watershed Association, Inc. of Groton received $6,970 to support The Wild Inside program.

The North County Land Trust in Leominster has received $6,250 to support the launch of an engaging environment and wellness program.

The Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society received $5,500 for its Catmobile low-cost spaying and neutering program.

Mass Audobon received $5,000 to support their nature and social-emotional learning sites, as part of their Head Start program, in Athol, Gardner and Winchendon.

The Massachusetts Chapter of the Northeast Organic Farming Association received $5,000 to support collaboration with educators and community members to create and deliver a program on pollinators and pollinator habits and build a hall outdoor class.

Athol Farm School received $5,000 to help purchase a horse-drawn hay mower.

Lancaster’s RFK Community Alliance received $5,000 for its Rein in a Dream program, which offers therapeutic horseback riding

Squannacook Greenways received $4,300 for the final phase of construction of the Squannacook Rail Trail.

The Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center received $3,200 to purchase new rubber mats and halters for the eight Newfoundland ponies residing at the Carl E. Dahl House.

For more information, visit cfncm.org.

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Noblesville Preservation Alliance selected for year-long initiative – Hamilton County Reporter https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/noblesville-preservation-alliance-selected-for-year-long-initiative-hamilton-county-reporter/ Thu, 05 May 2022 07:29:52 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/noblesville-preservation-alliance-selected-for-year-long-initiative-hamilton-county-reporter/ The Noblesville Preservation Alliance Board of Directors pose in front of Preservation Hall, rehabilitated by the group in 2020 to serve as a corporate headquarters, arts venue and community center. For more information about Preservation Hall and NPA, visit preservehall.org. (Photo courtesy of Noblesville Preservation Alliance) Posted By: The Journalist May 5, 2022 Five grassroots […]]]>
The Noblesville Preservation Alliance Board of Directors pose in front of Preservation Hall, rehabilitated by the group in 2020 to serve as a corporate headquarters, arts venue and community center. For more information about Preservation Hall and NPA, visit preservehall.org. (Photo courtesy of Noblesville Preservation Alliance)

Five grassroots historic preservation organizations have been selected to participate in Indiana Landmarks’ inaugural Affiliate Advancement Program, a year-long training initiative aimed at strengthening local volunteer-led groups.

Through workshops led by leading professionals, participating organizations will learn strategies to help improve fundraising and planning efforts, develop new opportunities for community engagement, and communicate the role of historic preservation in creating vibrant and resilient communities.

Organizations selected to participate in 2022 include Cornerstone Society of Madison; Historic Fall Creek, Pendleton Settlement; Noblesville Preservation Alliance; Save our stories to Marion; and the Vincennes Knox Preservation Foundation.

The groups were selected through a competitive application process from among 61 Indiana Landmarks affiliate organizations, which work as local partners to help save and revitalize historic places. Each participating organization has demonstrated leadership in rehabilitating historic properties within its community, but is seeking ideas to increase local capacity.

Corbett

“Noblesville’s success in attracting new residents and businesses is due in part to the historic buildings that connect our community’s past and present,” said Mike Corbett, Treasurer of Noblesville Preservation Alliance and Board Member of Indiana Landmarks. “We look forward to building NPA’s capability and leadership as we prepare to celebrate our 35th anniversary in 2023.”

Experts leading the training include professionals from Ball State’s Indiana Communities Institute, Propeller Marketing, Creative Insight Community Development, the Indiana Historical Society and Jamie Simek, author of Beyond the Bake Sale. At the end of the program in March 2023, participating affiliate organizations will share their strategies for increasing community engagement with each other.

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County Historical Society Recognizes Volunteers https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/county-historical-society-recognizes-volunteers/ Tue, 03 May 2022 05:20:08 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/county-historical-society-recognizes-volunteers/ The Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society has recognized three individuals for their commitment to the area’s history. The society held its annual luncheon and meeting last week, which included the announcement of historic preservation award recipients and volunteers. Kelly English Borman received the Callaway County Individual Preservation Award. The county turned 200 and the historical […]]]>

The Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society has recognized three individuals for their commitment to the area’s history.

The society held its annual luncheon and meeting last week, which included the announcement of historic preservation award recipients and volunteers.

Kelly English Borman received the Callaway County Individual Preservation Award.

The county turned 200 and the historical society turned 60 in 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic kept people from having public celebrations.

Borman worked with the historical society to organize a selfie scavenger hunt that included 20 historic locations around Callaway County. The goal was to get people out and celebrate birthdays safely.

As part of organizing the scavenger hunt, Borman reviewed maps, spoke with landowners and businesses, met with local officials, and promoted it.

Then in 2021, Borman did it again for the state’s 200th anniversary. This time it included Callaway County and the five neighboring counties.

She received the award for her work on both projects.

Michael Boulware (posthumously) and Sheila Burre Guthrie received the Barbara Dunavant Huddleston Volunteer Service Awards.

Boulware served on the historical society’s board of directors for 17 years, including a two-year stint as chairman.

His favorite event was the annual tractor ride, which he regularly helped organize and run.

Guthrie helps organize the historical society’s Fashion and FUN shows. She is also the head of the company’s clothing closet, which is full of vintage clothes and quilts.

She has volunteered with the historical society for over 14 years.

In addition to volunteering with the Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society, Guthrie is a founding member of the Tebbetts Area Historical Society.

The Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society also presented the Corporate Callaway County Historic Preservation Award to the New Bloomfield Area Historical Society.

Kelly English Borman receives her individual Callaway County Historic Preservation Award from Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society President Victor Pasley. (Submitted)
photo The family of Michael Boulware posthumously receives their Barbara Dunavant Hiddleston Award for Voluntary Service from the President of the Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society, Victor Pasley. (Submitted)
photo Sheila Burre Guthrie receives her volunteer service award from the President of the Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society, Victor Pasley. (Submitted)
photo Members of the New Bloomfield Area Historical Society accept the Corporate Callaway County Historic Preservation Award from Kingdom of Callaway Historical Society President Victor Pasley. (Submitted)
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Destroyed historic NJ cemetery, with ‘piled up headstones’ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/destroyed-historic-nj-cemetery-with-piled-up-headstones/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 19:36:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/destroyed-historic-nj-cemetery-with-piled-up-headstones/ A historic Quaker cemetery in Burlington County was destroyed earlier this month, and residents say no one is held responsible. Victor Ramos said he was driving along Route 206 in Mansfield just before Easter when he saw construction equipment tearing up Old Friends Cemetery, which dates back to pre-Revolutionary times. When he later passed, the […]]]>

A historic Quaker cemetery in Burlington County was destroyed earlier this month, and residents say no one is held responsible.

Victor Ramos said he was driving along Route 206 in Mansfield just before Easter when he saw construction equipment tearing up Old Friends Cemetery, which dates back to pre-Revolutionary times. When he later passed, the construction equipment was gone and the cemetery was in ruins.

“I saw gravestones piled up, just trashed, the whole thing,” Ramos, a member of the local historical society, told NJ Advance Media.

Photos from the cemetery show headstones removed from their original locations and several examples of what appear to be open graves, including at least one that appears to have been a child’s grave. Some tombstones are split in two.

A broken headstone from the Quaker Old Friends Cemetery in Mansfield.Victor Ramos

Tom Stevenson, also a member of the historical society, said it wasn’t just about destroying the tomb: it was about holding those responsible accountable. Township officials did not say who was responsible for the damage, but Stevenson said he believed it was a company trying to build a through road for a nearby warehouse.

The township administrator did not return NJ Advance Media’s request for comment.

Stevenson says a report was written by the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office to assess the historic nature of the land in 2010, but no one at the local historical society was able to locate that report.

“We have ancestors and our families (buried) here and our heritage, but where is the government’s responsibility?” Stevenson said.

The land that housed the former meeting house of Mansfield’s early friends was sold to private individuals in the 1980s, according to an email from the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office sent to Stevenson and reviewed by NJ Advance Media. The private owners have acknowledged the land as a cemetery and have pledged not to disturb the graves, while allowing visitors, the email reads.

But the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office can’t help either, the email says, and advises Stevenson to contact an attorney.

“Everyone seems to be saying, ‘It’s out of my hands,'” Ramos said.

The Quaker Old Friends Cemetery in Mansfield

A view of the Quaker Old Friends Cemetery in Mansfield before it was destroyed.Victor Ramos

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Katie Kausch can be contacted at kkausch@njadvancemedia.com. Tell us your coronavirus story or send a tip here.

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