Grayland Cranberry Museum under new owner, reopened on a limited schedule on July 3

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The Cranberry Museum in Grayland reopened on July 3 with a new addition.

The museum, which is now under the direction of the Westport South Beach Historical Society, has added a gift shop called CranZberry.

“I am pleased to share … that the Company, in accordance with its mission to preserve and interpret the history of South Beach and to advocate for the preservation of our local historic structures, is taking over the operation of the Grayland Cranberry Museum, ”Westport South Beach Historical Society director John Shaw told Facebook on July 2.

The Furford Picker Museum and Company – makers of cranberry harvesting equipment invented in 1957 that picks berries and pruns vines and is still widely used today – had been operated by Gwen and Chuck Tjernberg since 2010. Shaw a said Holly Marshall of Holamar LLC recently purchased the museum and collecting business “with an agreement that continues the Cranberry Museum under the direction of the Westport South Beach Historical Society”.

Marshall is the one who added the CranZberry gift shop. Visitors will find crafts, fridge magnets, clothing and more to commemorate a visit.

The Furford Picker was invented by longtime Grayland resident Julius Furford. He was active in the manufacture of the harvester / pruner until his death in 1999 when the machine had not been produced for several years. When the Tjernbergs took it over in 2010, they started producing spare parts and between 2012 and 2016 they built 22 new machines.

The museum building was built by the local Finnish community in 1933 as a social hall. Ocean Spray Cranberries bought the property and added a second building in 1946, using both to dehydrate the berries before moving the operation to the current Markham plant.

In 1956 Furford bought the property and converted one of the buildings into a machine shop where he built his pickers / pruners. It was Furford’s dream to open the Cranberry Museum to celebrate the region’s thriving cranberry industry.

Gwen Tjernberg died in May. Shaw said the company is “happy to fulfill its desire for the Cranberry Museum to continue and prosper.”

This includes the mix of stories from the region’s history beyond, but still focused on, the cranberry industry along South Beach.

“We plan to continue to develop the Cranberry Museum which started with the Furfords and our own Bob and Ruth McCausland, and then find the Tjernbergs carrying the torch,” Shaw said. “The company plans to continue its efforts on the cranberry industry and community and to blend in with some of the stories more specifically from the south end of our beaches.”

This will include the Grayland Coast Guard, the Lost Lifeboat and Lighthouse, North Cove and the changing landscape of Cape Shoalwater.

For the moment, the museum, made up of all the volunteers, will be open from Friday to Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. A donation is the entrance fee.

Shaw hopes to add more hours later this summer and recruit more volunteers. The museum and gift shop are located at 2395 State Route 105 in Grayland.

You can also call the museum at 360-267-3303 if you are in the area and would like to arrange a visit by appointment.

Courtesy of the Westport South Beach Historical Society The Grayland Cranberry Museum reopened on the weekend of July 4, under the direction of the Westport South Beach Historical Society.

Courtesy of the Westport South Beach Historical Society The Grayland Cranberry Museum reopened on the weekend of July 4th.  In addition to displays of cranberry harvesting equipment, the museum now includes a gift shop, called Cranzberry.

Courtesy of the Westport South Beach Historical Society The Grayland Cranberry Museum reopened on the weekend of July 4th. In addition to displays of cranberry harvesting equipment, the museum now includes a gift shop, called Cranzberry.


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