world war – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ Fri, 28 Jul 2023 14:10:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.3.1 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-3-150x150.png world war – Arbeia Society http://arbeiasociety.org.uk/ 32 32 Kennebunkport Renaissance man honored at 105 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kennebunkport-renaissance-man-honored-at-105/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kennebunkport-renaissance-man-honored-at-105/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2023 15:24:01 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/kennebunkport-renaissance-man-honored-at-105/ [ad_1] It would be difficult – indeed, impossible – to dispute Peter Whalon’s description of his friend Frank Handlen as a “Renaissance man.” During his 105 years, Handlen was a gifted shipyard worker, carpenter and artist who donated dozens of his paintings to organizations in Kennebunkport and surrounding areas for auction to raise funds. Oh, […]]]>

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It would be difficult – indeed, impossible – to dispute Peter Whalon’s description of his friend Frank Handlen as a “Renaissance man.”

During his 105 years, Handlen was a gifted shipyard worker, carpenter and artist who donated dozens of his paintings to organizations in Kennebunkport and surrounding areas for auction to raise funds. Oh, and there’s this 40-foot sailboat that he built in his backyard. And his sculpture of a fisherman and his wife, commemorating the town’s first inhabitants, which can be found in the village square of Kennebunkport.

Frank Handlen’s 1995 sculpture “Our Ancestors on the Coast†at Kennebunkport Village Green is one of the many lifelong accomplishments for which Handlen was honored on Friday by the Kennebunkport Historical Society. Ben McCanna / Personal Photographer

On Friday, the Kennebunkport Historical Society honored Handlen with an hour-long talk from Whalon, a past president of the historical society, about his friend, followed by a reception and birthday cake. Handlen walked in on his own – he had a walker, but seemed to do little to no work at all – and made a few remarks on his own after Whalon recounted a remarkable life.

Handlen was born on September 26, 2016 in Brooklyn, New York, but there is an intriguing story to even this mundane fact. Whalon said the 26th was the date of Handlen’s birth certificate, although Handlen’s mother always insisted he was born on the 27th.

The Handlens moved to New Jersey, where a family friend told Handlen after graduating from high school that Maine was a land of opportunity, especially for an artist.

So at 18 he came north to Biddeford Pool, worked in a shipyard, and continued to paint – seascapes and boats at anchor were favorite subjects – to the side. During World War II he was not drafted as he was 25, married and had two children, but he did contribute to the war effort by helping to assemble machine guns.

He moved to Kennebunkport in 1970, where he indulged his passion for shipbuilding by hand-building a 40-foot sailboat, often using tools he himself made, in his garden. After four years of construction, the launch was apparently quite a city event, with the boat being trucked through Dock Square to be christened and launched in the Kennebunk River.

Frank Handlen, 105, blows out a candle on a birthday cake on Friday with the Kennebunkport Historical Society, which honored him as the city’s oldest resident. Ben McCanna / Personal Photographer

Without any assurance that it would not sink immediately, Handlen “seriously considered launching it at night, without a moon,” Whalon said, but the Salt Wind remained afloat and frequently carried Handlen and his second wife offshore. coasts of New England and as far as the Bahamas.

But art has always been at the center of Handlen’s life, Whalon said, and at one point his work caught the attention of Charles Cawley, founder of MBNA, a rapidly growing credit card issuer.

Cawley bought a few of Handlen’s paintings – then a few more, and more after that, Whalon said.

“Cawley was like an ATM for Frank,†Whalon said.

Handlen listened and chuckled as Whalon recounted his stories, then stood to add some personal remarks. And, he told the fifty or so people present at the historical society gathering that he still paints daily – but, “honestly, I had to give up tap dancing.”


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Russia’s Top Five Persistent Disinformation Narratives https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/russias-top-five-persistent-disinformation-narratives/ Sat, 15 Jul 2023 23:03:35 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/russias-top-five-persistent-disinformation-narratives/ For many years, Russia has fabricated a set of false narratives that its ecosystem of disinformation and propaganda constantly injects into the global information environment. These narratives act as a blueprint, which allows the Kremlin to adjust these narratives, with consistency – a complete disregard for the truth as it shapes the information environment to […]]]>

For many years, Russia has fabricated a set of false narratives that its ecosystem of disinformation and propaganda constantly injects into the global information environment. These narratives act as a blueprint, which allows the Kremlin to adjust these narratives, with consistency – a complete disregard for the truth as it shapes the information environment to support its political goals.

Russian military and intelligence entities engage in this activity across the Russian disinformation and propaganda ecosystem, including malicious social media operations, use of overt and covert online media, injection of disinformation into television and radio programs, the organization of lectures designed to influence participants to mistakenly believe that Ukraine, and not Russia, is responsible for the increased tensions in the region and the exploitation of cyber operations to deface media and conduct hack and release operations.

Here are five major recurring themes of Russian disinformation that the Kremlin is currently readjusting in an attempt to fill the news environment with false narratives about its actions in Ukraine.

Theme #1: “Russia is an innocent victim”

Russian government officials falsely portray Russia as a perpetual victim and its aggressive actions as a forced response to the alleged actions of the United States and our democratic allies and partners. To back up these claims, Russia is turning to one of its favorite labels to try to fight back: “Russophobia”. After invading Ukraine in 2014, the Russian government and state-controlled disinformation outlets began accusing anyone who questioned Russia’s actions of being xenophobic Russophobes.

For example, Russia claims that the international community’s negative reaction to its invasion of an independent country was simply because people feared and hated Russia. According to the chart below, Russophobia was not a major issue for the Russian Foreign Ministry or state-funded disinformation outlets until the Russian military invaded Ukraine. Allegations of “Russophobia” persist across a range of topics and are used whenever the Russian government wants to play the role of victim, when in fact it is the aggressor.

Chart showing mentions of the words “Russophobia” and “Russophobe” by the Russian Foreign Ministry, Sputnik and RT, 2001-2017. (Source: DFRLab)

Theme #2: Historical revisionism

When history does not align with the political goals of the Kremlin, Russian government officials and their proxies deny historical events or distort historical accounts to try to portray Russia in a more favorable light and serve its national agenda. and geopolitics. For example, the 1939 non-aggression pact between the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, also known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, which helped precipitate World War II, is politically inconvenient for the regime of Putin. In 2020, in an attempt to downplay and rationalize Stalin’s decision to align himself with Hitler, Putin released a twisted version of the start of World War II, downplaying the Soviet role and blaming the war on others. other countries. Russia often goes further, labeling those who disagree with its twisted version of history as Nazis or Nazi sympathizers.

The Kremlin also applies this formula to the history of the Ukrainian state, to the conduct of NATO during the collapse of the Soviet Union, to its GULAG prison system, to the famine in Ukraine known as Holodomor and many other events where the Kremlin’s historic actions do not serve its current action. political goals.

Theme #3: “The Collapse of Western Civilization Is Imminent”

Russia pushes the false claim that Western civilization is collapsing and has drifted away from “traditional values” because it strives to ensure safety and equality for LGBTQI+ people and promotes concepts such as women’s equality and multiculturalism. The demise of Western civilization is one of Russia’s oldest disinformation tropes, with claims of “the decaying West” documented since the 19and century.

This “values” based misinformation narrative conjures up ill-defined concepts including “tradition,” “family values,” and “spirituality.” Russia claims it is the bastion of so-called “traditional values” and gender roles and serves as a moral counterweight to the “decadence” of the United States and Western countries. For example, President Putin claimed that the West had practically canceled the concepts of “mother” and “father” and replaced them with “parent 1 and 2”, while Foreign Minister Lavrov wrote that the Western students “learn in school that Jesus the Christ was bisexual.

Theme #4: “People’s movements are US-sponsored ‘color revolutions’”

The Kremlin struggles to accept that all individuals have the fundamental right to freedom of expression and that the government is accountable to its people. Russia has accused the United States of instigating uprisings or plotting “color revolutions” in Georgia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Ukraine and throughout the Middle East and Africa. If a grassroots movement is pro-democracy and pro-reform and not considered to be in Russia’s geopolitical interest, the Kremlin will often attack its legitimacy and claim that the United States is secretly behind it. These baseless accusations often target local and international civil society organizations, as well as independent media that expose human rights abuses and corruption. The Kremlin seeks to deny that people in neighboring countries can have agency, dignity and independent aspirations to defend themselves, just as it denies these qualities to the Russian people.

Theme #5: Reality is what the Kremlin wants it to be

The Kremlin frequently tries to create multiple false realities and introduce confusion into the information environment when the truth is not in its interest. Often intentionally confusing, Russian officials make arguments intended to try to shift blame away from the role of the Russian government, even though some of the accounts contradict each other. However, over time, the presentation of multiple conflicting accounts can itself become a technique intended to generate confusion and discourage responses. Other elements of Russia’s disinformation and propaganda ecosystem, such as the abuse of state-funded disinformation outlets and militarized social media, help spread multiple false narratives.

It was clear to the world, for example, that Russia attempted to assassinate former Russian military intelligence officer Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia with the nerve agent Novichok in Salisbury, England on March 4, 2018. In In the four weeks since that incident, Russia’s state-funded and run media RT and Sputnik ran 138 separate and conflicting accounts via 735 articles, according to the Policy Institute at King’s College London.

Russia has used the same technique of flooding the information space with numerous false claims following other events, such as the downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 and the invasion and continued occupation of Georgia. by Russia in 2008, to divert conversations from their role in the events. Again, the goal is to confuse and distract others and manipulate the truth to suit Kremlin interests.

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Arts calendar: Dec. 24 Jan 1 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/arts-calendar-dec-24-jan-1/ Tue, 30 May 2023 23:28:31 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/arts-calendar-dec-24-jan-1/ [ad_1] Strumming in the new year Ellis Paul and his entire group, along with several special guests, will be welcoming the New Year on January 1 at Longfellow Square in Portland. Contribution / Tim Rice Exhibitions / Galleries David Petit, mixed media arts, until December 31, Merrill Memorial Library, Yarmouth. “Domestic fires: Liberty and captivity […]]]>

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Strumming in the new year

Ellis Paul and his entire group, along with several special guests, will be welcoming the New Year on January 1 at Longfellow Square in Portland. Contribution / Tim Rice

Exhibitions / Galleries

David Petit, mixed media arts, until December 31, Merrill Memorial Library, Yarmouth.

“Domestic fires: Liberty and captivity â€, University of New England Art Gallery, 716 Stevens Ave., Portland. Free until January 23 library.une.edu.

Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress St., Portland: “Sagadahoc County through the Eastern Eye: Selections from the Penobscot Marine Museum”, “Begin Again: Counting Intolerance in Maine”, “Passing the Time: Works of Art by Prisoners of German War of World War II in Aroostook County, â€until December 31. histoiremaine.org.

Peace and joy, holiday exhibit at the Arts & Cultural Alliance of Freeport Meetinghouse Arts Gallery, 40 Main St., until December 30 freeportartsandculture.org.

«Re | frame the collection: New Considerations in European and American Art, 1475-1875 â€, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, at December 31. bowdoin.edu/art-museum.

“Through the lens: Midcoast Maine”, Chocolate Church Arts Center, 804 Washington St., Bath, until January 8.

In progress

Maine Art Collective, multimedia experience led by 14 artists from Maine using media ranging from sculpture to jewelry, painting to photography. Maine Art Collective, 18 Exchange St. Portland.

Space gallery, 538 Congress Street, Portland. space538.org/expositions.

Movie

Apohadion Theater, virtual projections via theapohadiontheater.com.

Southworth Planetarium, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, usm.maine.edu/planet/location-and-hours.

Museums

Bowdoin College Art Museum, Brunswickexamines the representation of black women over the past two centuries, “Transformations: New Acquisitions of Global Contemporary Art,†both through Jan. 30; “New Views of the Middle Ages: Highlights from the Wyvern Collection”, until February 27, hours bowdoin.edu/art-museum.

Portland Art Museum: “Clifford Ross: Sightlinesâ€, major survey of one of the world’s most eminent multimedia artists, mandatory masks for all, until January 9. portlandmuseum.org.

Victoria Manor, 109 Danforth Street, Portland. Open until January 9, closed Mondays, Christmas and New Years. victoriamansion.org/christmas-at-victoria-mansion-2.

In progress

Maine Museum of Photographic Arts Antidote online at mainmuseumofphotographicarts.org/antidote.

Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. by reservation, Bowdoin College, 255, rue Maine, Brunswick, bowdoin.edu/arctic-museum.

Portland Art Museum, Congress Street, portlandmuseum.org.

Music

Sunday 12/26

holiday home | Dimensions in Jazz, 8 p.m., Portland Conservatory of Music, 28 Neal St., Portland. $ 5- $ 25, portlandconservatoryofmusic.org.

Monday 27/12 /

Dar Williams with Crys Matthews, 8 p.m., One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $ 45 / $ 55 on the day of.

Start Making Sense – A Tribute To Talking Heads, 8 p.m. State Theater, 609 Congress St, Portland. $ 20.

Thursday 12/30

Irish evening with the eagles, 6:30 p.m., Portland Eagles, 184 St John St., Portland. Open to the public; sign up at the bar. bandsintown.com.

Friday 12/31 /

Samples with SeepeopleS, 8 p.m., Bayside Bowl, 58 Alder St., Portland, bandsintown.com.

The ghost of Paul Revere, 8:30 p.m., State Theater, 609 Congress St., Portland. $ 30.

Saturday 1/1

Ellis Paul, 8 p.m., One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, bandsintown.com.

In progress

80s retro party, DJ rotating the last Saturday of each month, Flask Lounge, 117 Spring St., Portland. flasklounge.com.

Afrobeat Saturdays: 9 p.m. Saturdays, Aura Maine, 121 Center St., Portland, eventbrite.com.

Darling Corey, 6 p.m. first Friday of the month through December, Port City Blue, 650A Congress St., Portland.

Foundation Friday, second Friday of the month, Flask Lounge, 117 Spring St., Portland. Community. To dance. Music. To like. See flasklounge.com for the time.

Irish music evening, 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Blue, 650A Congress St., Portland, facebook.com/IrishNightAtBlue.

Karaoke, 10 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thursdays, Sea Dog Brewing Company, 125 Western Ave., South Portland. sopo.seadogbrewing.com.

Under the covers, 8 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., third Friday of the month, Seasons Grille, 155 Riverside St., Portland. To free.

Theater / Dance

Disney on Ice, December 24-27, Cross Insurance Arena, Portland, $ 18- $ 115.

Good theater shows: “Who’s on vacation?” “ 7 p.m. to January 2, St. Lawrence Arts, Munjoy Hill, Portland, $ 27- $ 34, stlawrencearts.org.

Friday 12/31 /

New Year’s Planetarium, 6:30 p.m., Southworth Planetarium, 96 Falmouth St., Portland. $ 7 to $ 20.

A comedy of haunted history, 7 p.m., Bell Buoy Park, 72 Commercial St., Portland. Travel through the spooky corners of Portland’s Old Harbor in this haunted story comedy, $ 19.99 – $ 29.99, wickedwalkingtours.com.

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Volunteer caretaker breathes new life into historic cemetery | Progress News https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/volunteer-caretaker-breathes-new-life-into-historic-cemetery-progress-news/ Sun, 30 Apr 2023 14:56:10 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/volunteer-caretaker-breathes-new-life-into-historic-cemetery-progress-news/ [ad_1] MADERA – A new stone, perched on an embankment above Crooked Sewer Road, marks Henderson Cemetery – a small burial site with a rich history. Volunteer warden Tom Stodart celebrated the installation of the stone and the new flagpole with sunlight on Veterans Day. Stodart has looked after the cemetery, located near Henderson Street, […]]]>

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MADERA – A new stone, perched on an embankment above Crooked Sewer Road, marks Henderson Cemetery – a small burial site with a rich history.

Volunteer warden Tom Stodart celebrated the installation of the stone and the new flagpole with sunlight on Veterans Day. Stodart has looked after the cemetery, located near Henderson Street, for approximately 27 years.

His wife Joyce’s previous husband and family maintained the resting place.

“They were the original keepers and then it got really run down,†Stodart said. “I told Joyce that I’m going to go up to the cemetery and see what I can do.”

Joyce’s nephew made the original wooden sign. The elements focused on the sign, which began to fall apart, noted Stodart.

Stodart began to visit various organizations, including Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, and Supervisors of the Township of Woodward, asking for help. An individual also made a donation for the care of the cemetery.

“Once they all heard what he was doing, they were more than eager to help,†said Joyce Stodart, “Because a lot of people didn’t even know the cemetery was there.â€

Stodart has ideas for the surrounding areas, which feature historical elements such as an old school foundation.

Stodart lives a stone’s throw from the cemetery. A hangar contains all of its equipment. The caretaker even has a path to the cemetery from the house.

Routine maintenance includes mowing the grass about once a week. Sinking stones require dirt for leveling, Stodart noted.

The oldest gravestone, Joyce Stodart recalls, dates from 1793. The markings on the stone may look different from those today.

Robert Mathers, born June 16, 1798, died at the age of 78 years and two months, according to his gravestone.

And the most recent addition to the cemetery dates back to the early 1900s, according to Stodart.

The stones have been recently maintained. When Philipsburg Marble & Granite installed the new stone, Tom Stodart asked if headstones could attract attention. For a cost covered by donations from the community, the stones received care.

“The stones that were broken, we had to glue them back together as much as possible because they are fragile,†Stodart said.

Other features of the cemetery include a World War I veteran. It is believed that there might be a Civil War veteran. However, this has not been confirmed, Stodart said.

The former president of the Clearfield County Historical Society – the late David Wulderk – began to reflect on the history of the cemetery. Wulderk died in August. Another gentleman will potentially contribute to the research process, according to Stodart.

Before the new stone, it was perhaps difficult to see the historic site. Stodart hopes some trees will be cut soon, freeing up space for drivers to see better. The Township of Woodward will likely facilitate this process.

At the moment, Stodart is taking care of the cemetery on his own. In the future, he might need help. He is grateful for the continued support the community has provided so far.

“There is an overwhelming response to help,†Stodart said. “I can’t say enough about the supervisors or the veterans or the Legion or whoever it is. “

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Madison County Historical Society Recognized as Illinois Centennial Organization | Press Releases https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/madison-county-historical-society-recognized-as-illinois-centennial-organization-press-releases/ Fri, 24 Mar 2023 22:30:43 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/madison-county-historical-society-recognized-as-illinois-centennial-organization-press-releases/ [ad_1] The Illinois State Historical Society recently recognized the Madison County Historical Society (MCHS) as the Illinois Centennial Organization. The Centennial Awards certificate states that the MCHS “has contributed to the civic and economic heritage of the State of Illinois for one hundred years.” A century ago, on December 3, 1921, the Madison County Historical […]]]>

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The Illinois State Historical Society recently recognized the Madison County Historical Society (MCHS) as the Illinois Centennial Organization. The Centennial Awards certificate states that the MCHS “has contributed to the civic and economic heritage of the State of Illinois for one hundred years.”

A century ago, on December 3, 1921, the Madison County Historical Society held its first annual meeting in the Estates Court Room of the Madison County Courthouse. The aim of the new organization was to “preserve the books, papers, military records and any other item of the county of historical interest”.

The officers elected to serve the new organization were Professor William D. Armstrong, Alton, president; Gaius Paddock, Fort Russell, vice-president; Estates Judge George W. Crossman, Secretary; Miss Laura Gonterman, Treasurer.

The directors included Mrs. Charles (Annie) Burton, Edwardsville, Wilbur T. Norton, Alton and William L. Waters, Godfrey. Associate members of the Board of Directors were Ms. Mark Henson, Collinsville and Norman G. Flagg, Fort Russell.

Since the first annual meeting was held on the 103rd anniversary of the state of Illinois, Flagg, an Illinois lawmaker whose family came to Madison County in 1818, has related ” interesting historical events of the state â€. Burton recited the lyrics to “Illinois, Our Illinois,†a song she wrote and published in 1918 to commemorate the Illinois Centennial and pay homage to Illinois soldiers during World War I.

Almost a century later, in 2016, descendants of the Flagg and Paddock families of Madison County donated a large collection of documents, photographs and artifacts to the Madison County Historical Society. Norman G. Flagg’s grandparents, the family’s first settlers in Madison County, were Gershom Flagg (1792-1857) and his wife, Jane Paddock Flagg (1787-1863). Both families were from Vermont.

The first meeting ended with an invitation to all county residents to join the Society at a cost of $ 1 per year in annual dues.

Annual dues have increased over the past 100 years, but the invitation remains for all county residents to join the Society. The Society’s mission is also largely unchanged, with the organization collecting and preserving all manner of artifacts that tell the story of Madison County and its people. To support the ongoing work of the Madison County Historical Society, visit https://madcohistory.org/membership/ or call 618-656-1294 for more information. Gift certificates are available for the holidays.

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Celebrating African American Women’s History in Muncie https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrating-african-american-womens-history-in-muncie/ Wed, 18 Jan 2023 12:56:35 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/celebrating-african-american-womens-history-in-muncie/ President of the Delaware County Historical Society and Delaware County Historian Karen Vincent hosted a presentation in honor of celebrating African American women in Muncie history on February 22. Other speakers in the presentation were Delaware County Historical Society Board Member Karen Good, Melissa Gentry, Supervisor of GIS Research at Ball State Libraries, Sara McKinley, […]]]>

President of the Delaware County Historical Society and Delaware County Historian Karen Vincent hosted a presentation in honor of celebrating African American women in Muncie history on February 22.

Other speakers in the presentation were Delaware County Historical Society Board Member Karen Good, Melissa Gentry, Supervisor of GIS Research at Ball State Libraries, Sara McKinley, Supervisor of the local history and genealogy at the Muncie Public Library and Nalleli Guillen, associate director of curatorial and exhibits for the Minnetrista Museum and Gardens.

Vincent said the purpose of this presentation is to provide historical context for Muncie and to acknowledge the list of more than 400 women who have made a difference in the Delaware County community.

“Today’s community includes so many strong women who are making history with their dedication to service,” Vincent said.

Good begins the presentation by acknowledging a woman named Lucille Bauer, for starting the waisman mission.

“The waisman mission was a program that would not only provide shelter for homeless women and children, but temporarily help the unfortunate, the destitute and the disabled,” Good said.

Gentry moved the presentation by telling the story of a year in the life of African American women living in Muncie.

“In April 1917, Americans woke up to the news that the United States had entered World War I,” Gentry said. “Lydia Nichols, an African-American woman who published a column called In Colored Circles for the Muncie Star, went from reporting on church events to reporting on the church’s mobilization in support of soldiers,” said said Gentry.

McKinley takes the lead and introduces someone named Alice Jones who has contributed greatly to Muncie’s rich African-American history. She was the first African American woman on the Muncie City Council.

McKinley said Alice married a man named William McIntosh.

“By this time, Alice had already accomplished so much for the town of Muncie and the black community,” she said. “She was inducted as one of 12 founding members of the one-stop-shop Black Hall of Fame.”

The final speaker at Muncie’s celebration of African American history was Nalleli Guillen and she spoke among the diverse staff of the Ball family in the early 20th century.

Minnetrista was a talking point for Guillen. “As natural gas brought new industry to this area, creating new jobs and wealth, it also brought an increasingly diverse population to the Magic Town,” Guillen said.

She also paid tribute to a few African Americans who have partnered with the Ball family to reinforce the importance Minnetrista holds for the Muncie community.

“Furthermore, their experiences as Black Munsonians speak volumes about Black life, culture, and community in Muncie, as well as the social struggles and triumphs that have emerged as the population of the city ​​diversified throughout the 20th century,” Guillen said.

Another presentation will take place in the Student Center Music Lounge on March 21 during Ball State Women’s Week.

Contact Jamie Strouts with comments at [email protected].

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Baltimore Olympian Robert Garrett’s legacy lives on https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/baltimore-olympian-robert-garretts-legacy-lives-on/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/baltimore-olympian-robert-garretts-legacy-lives-on/#respond Wed, 11 Jan 2023 06:31:00 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/baltimore-olympian-robert-garretts-legacy-lives-on/ [ad_1] Excitement is in the air as the Tokyo Olympics kick off. With so many Maryland natives competing, there are plenty of athletes to cheer on. But more than a century ago, a Baltimore resident was part of the first international Olympic games in modern history. Robert Garrett’s legacy lives on today through athletics and […]]]>

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Excitement is in the air as the Tokyo Olympics kick off. With so many Maryland natives competing, there are plenty of athletes to cheer on. But more than a century ago, a Baltimore resident was part of the first international Olympic games in modern history. Robert Garrett’s legacy lives on today through athletics and history. 125 years ago, at the 1896 Summer Olympics, Garrett was making headlines, competing with about 240 others. Her grandson, James, said Garrett kind of fell into it. He was studying at Princeton University and was part of the track team. His teacher brought up the idea of ​​going to Greece. “They had a Princeton blacksmith make a disc, what they thought was a disc, about a foot wide, and it weighed between 30 and 27 pounds,” said James Garrett. It was almost impossible to move, let alone throw. The Americans didn’t know the true size of the Greek discus, so they made their best guess. Uncertainty did not prevent them from making the very long journey east. “Robert and three of his teammates decided to do it. So in March 1896 they set sail on a steamboat called of course no airlift,†James Garrett said. After a trip of several weeks, they arrived just a day before the start of the games. It turns out that the Greek discus weighed only 6 pounds and half its size. It only took three tries for Garrett to beat the Greek champion. “He ended up going about 6 inches further than the Greek champion,†said James Garrett. His grandson said Garrett won the shot put and placed second in the long jump and high jump, but his passion for track and field didn’t end after the Olympics. “He was very dedicated to providing young people in Baltimore and across the country with the opportunity to really participate in sports. He developed the athletic field league here, which eventually went into parks and recreation. served as chairman of this board for many years, â€said James Garrett. Garrett was also extremely interested in the story. “Not only was he this formidable Olympian, but in the 1940s, after World War II, he worked to really restore and reinvigorate Preservation Maryland, or what was then known as the Society for the Preservation of Maryland Antiquities,” said Nicholas Redding, President and CEO of Preservation MD. nization celebrates his 90th birthday with a big thank you to Garrett, and his legacy lives on in Maryland. “We revitalize historic buildings. We train the next generation of historic tradespeople and create new career opportunities, and we help historic communities invest in places that matter, â€said Redding. Garrett grew up at Evergreen House on North Charles Street, which is now a museum and library owned by Johns Hopkins. He became known as the last, first Olympian, who died in 1961. He left a lasting mark on the communities and people of Maryland and beyond. Garrett was also a avid collector of ancient manuscripts, collecting 11,000, which would be the largest collection in the US He ended up donating them to the Alma Mater, Princeton University.

Excitement is in the air as the Tokyo Olympics kick off. With so many Maryland natives competing, there are plenty of athletes to cheer on. But more than a century ago, a Baltimore resident was part of the first international Olympic games in modern history.

Robert Garrett’s legacy lives on today through athletics and history.

125 years ago, during the 1896 Summer Olympics, Garrett made headlines, competing with about 240 other people.

Her grandson, James, said Garrett kind of fell into it. He was studying at Princeton University and was part of the track team. His teacher brought up the idea of ​​going to Greece.

“They had a Princeton blacksmith make a disc, what they thought was a disc, about a foot wide, and it weighed between 30 and 27 pounds,” said James Garrett.

It was almost impossible to move, let alone throw. The Americans didn’t know the true size of the Greek discus, so they made their best guess. Uncertainty did not prevent them from making the very long journey east.

“Robert and three of his teammates decided to do it. So in March 1896 they boarded a steamboat called of course no airlift,†said James Garrett.

After a trip of several weeks, they arrived just a day before the start of the games. It turns out that the Greek discus weighed only 6 pounds and half its size.

It only took three tries for Garrett to beat the Greek champion.

“It ended up going about 6 inches further than the Greek champion,†said James Garrett.

His grandson said Garrett won the shot put and placed second in the long jump and high jump.

But his passion for athletics didn’t stop after the Olympics.

“He was very dedicated to providing young people in Baltimore and across the country the opportunity to truly participate in sports. He developed the athletic field league here, which eventually became part of parks and recreation. has served as chairman of this board for many years, â€said James Garrett.

Garrett was also extremely interested in the story.

“Not only was he this formidable Olympian, but in the 1940s, after World War II, he worked to really restore and reinvigorate Preservation Maryland, or what was then known as the Society for the Preservation of Maryland Antiquities. “said Nicholas Redding, President and CEO. of preservation MD.

Redding says the organization is celebrating its 90th anniversary with a big thank you to Garrett, and its legacy lives on in Maryland.

“We are revitalizing historic buildings. We are training the next generation of historic tradespeople and creating new career opportunities, and we are helping historic communities invest in places that matter,†said Redding.

Garrett grew up at Evergreen House on North Charles Street, which is now a museum and library owned by Johns Hopkins. He became known as the last, first Olympian, to die in 1961.

He left a lasting mark on the communities and people of Maryland and beyond.

Garrett was also an avid collector of ancient manuscripts, collecting 11,000 which would be the largest collection in the United States. He ended up giving them to the alma mater, Princeton University.

In addition to this, you need to know more about it.

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Examining First Ladies Beyond a “One-Dimensional Lens” https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/examining-first-ladies-beyond-a-one-dimensional-lens/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/examining-first-ladies-beyond-a-one-dimensional-lens/#respond Mon, 07 Nov 2022 20:26:36 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/examining-first-ladies-beyond-a-one-dimensional-lens/ [ad_1] This association is still relevant for a nation that has long viewed its first ladies as cultural icons before political figures. Jackie Kennedy, Gutin notes, was a staple of fashion magazines during her tenure as first lady. “And although she is known to most as a culture and fashion icon, what she would like […]]]>

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This association is still relevant for a nation that has long viewed its first ladies as cultural icons before political figures. Jackie Kennedy, Gutin notes, was a staple of fashion magazines during her tenure as first lady.

“And although she is known to most as a culture and fashion icon, what she would like to be remembered is for her vast knowledge of history and historical preservation,” Gutin said, citing the White House visit as the product of his passion.

Kennedy was far from the only first lady whose story was reduced to her choice of clothing. As Martha Washington traveled from Virginia to New York over two centuries ago, she noted that her hair needed to be washed and dressed every day in her new role as the president’s wife. To this day, the Smithsonian’s first ladies’ dress exhibit remains the only knowledge many Americans know about them. And while fashion is an important way to connect with history, “it’s a very one-dimensional lens to look at them through,†Gutin says.

This sentiment is shared by Anita McBride, founding member of FLARE who was previously Laura Bush’s chief of staff. McBride’s “front row seat†in his advocacy and involvement has helped boost his dedication to telling first ladies stories.

McBride was in the White House on September 11, 2001, and although she was not yet working for Laura Bush, she remembers the then first lady’s remarks as a key point. moment. It was after that day that Laura Bush was dubbed the “Chief Comforter†for her role in bringing peace to the nation, a role in which many other presidential spouses also played.

“I think this is an example of the role a first lady can play in making an impact on the nation,†said McBride, who also heads the First Ladies Initiative at American University. “And that was obviously a unique situation. But there have been other times in our history where the voice of the first lady has really helped in areas of national tragedy, â€she added, noting Eleanor Roosevelt’s role in rallying Americans around. of the war effort during World War II.

Of course, the exact role of the first lady changes from person to person. There was Eleanor Roosevelt, whom some historians call the “gold standard†of the first ladies. There was Dolley Madison, who is best known for saving George Washington’s portrait from a White House fire started by the British during the War of 1812. There was Mary Todd Lincoln, who visited wounded soldiers from the Union on horseback during the Civil War. And in recent years, there’s been Hillary Clinton, who won a Senate seat when she was first lady and became secretary of state.

As the only woman to win the presidential nomination of a major party in U.S. history, Clinton’s 2016 White House campaign also came close to making her husband, former President Bill Clinton. , the very first gentleman in the country.

James Rosebush, who worked for Nancy Reagan during her husband’s tenure in the White House, was the first person to serve as a commissioned officer for the president while he was the first lady’s chief of staff. When he thinks of his legacy, Rosebush says he thinks of a graduation ceremony they attended in Florida for children who had completed their drug rehab program. Rosebush sat next to Reagan as she watched the children hug and mourn their parents when their names were announced. In her hands, she clutched index cards with her prepared remarks written in blue ink. Everyone was crying, Rosebush, of the Secret Service told reporters.

Before addressing the gym, Reagan turned to Rosebush and tore up his index cards.

“It was an example of an escape moment for her,†Rosebush said, “and it worked because she exposed herself. She made herself vulnerable.

Rosebush said Reagan’s role was to support her husband in his presidency, an idea echoed by Ronald Reagan’s chief of staff Kenneth Duberstein. Duberstein said that many mornings Nancy Reagan called her as her husband walked into the office, giving her advice on planning based on how well she had sleep the night before.

It’s stories like these that FLARE wants to share, raising awareness of the first lady’s unpaid, unelected, full-time work. Gutin said that after giving lectures, people often come to her with one of two reactions: either they had no idea about the impact of the first ladies and they want to know more, or they have their own story to share after meeting one of the presidents’ spouses. This is how she heard some of her favorite First Lady stories, including that of a woman who was at Kennedy’s inaugural ball when Jackie looked her straight in the eye and said, “I have also this necklace.

According to the “first lady’s academic study godfather,” Lewis Gould, many first ladies are very influential, although they were cheated in their time. Gould, who taught the first college class on First Ladies, has already given Lady Bird Johnson a tour of his class. Before she came, he started getting calls from news agencies and others asking if they could attend his 15-person class.

“And I started to perceive that the first ladies were public figures who had this celebrity culture around them,†Gould said.

In their status as public figures, McBride said that presidents’ wives can help “soften the shock” of public perception about the President. After all, the first lady is almost always much more popular than her husband. When Barack Obama left the White House with a slowly rising 58% approval rating towards the end of his term, the numbers were even better for Michelle Obama, who was viewed favorably by 72% of people polled in a Pew poll. As for the assets, the former president stepped down with an approval rate down nearly 30%. Yet Melania Trump slightly overshadowed it, with 42% approval rate according to a CNN / SSRS poll.

As for the country’s very first second gentleman, Gutin said she was watching Doug Emhoff, who has previously proven to be politically active on issues, with great interest. And current first lady Jill Biden is setting a historic new precedent by taking a job outside the home – teaching English and writing classes at Northern Virginia Community College.

“We have gradually moved towards this modern characterization of the spouse as a working spouse,†said McBride. “And she takes us there. So, you know, each of them makes a contribution in their own way. “

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History teaches us what our next step should be https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/history-teaches-us-what-our-next-step-should-be/ https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/history-teaches-us-what-our-next-step-should-be/#respond Sat, 05 Nov 2022 15:06:44 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/history-teaches-us-what-our-next-step-should-be/ [ad_1] TOKYO – The reviews are all malicious fabrications. This is not a remark made recently. This is part of a statement issued by Adolf Hitler’s administration in Germany on March 27, 1933, in response to criticism of the violence and harassment against Jews which escalated after Hitler came to power in January of the […]]]>

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TOKYO – The reviews are all malicious fabrications.

This is not a remark made recently. This is part of a statement issued by Adolf Hitler’s administration in Germany on March 27, 1933, in response to criticism of the violence and harassment against Jews which escalated after Hitler came to power in January of the same year.

The repression against the Jews has now become an undeniable historical fact. But Nazi Germany at the time shamelessly contested it.

Correspondents from foreign media organizations were able to report what was happening in Germany from within the country for about six and a half years after Hitler’s emergence as chancellor until World War II broke out.

American journalists stayed in Germany for a few more years, until the United States entered the war in 1941.

While foreign correspondents became suspicious after losing contact with the Jews they interacted with, they also fell into a situation that did not allow them to freely pass information. Restrictions on media coverage have been gradually tightened and foreign correspondents have sometimes received threats.

It was not until the summer of 1942 – nearly three years after Hitler’s invasion of Poland sparked World War II – that reports of genocide committed against Jews in concentration camps set up in the regions controlled by Germany surprised the international community.

The news came like love at first sight.

Yet Jewish groups in the United States and in the British Mandate for Palestine, now Israel, as well as the American and British governments, have reportedly refused to take it seriously. They thought even the Nazis wouldn’t go that far.

In the closing days of World War II, officers and soldiers of the Allied forces who entered genocide sites, including Auschwitz, were horrified.

More lives would have been saved if the Allied forces had taken certain measures, including bombing the train tracks leading to the concentration camps, after scrutinizing the information transmitted to them.

The Nazis stole their valuables, gold, jewelry, and other forms from the Jews, melting it and turning it into ingots. They then sold the gold bars to Switzerland to replenish their war chest and for other purposes.

Switzerland, a neutral country, will be forever marred by its role in financing Hitler’s war machines and genocide.

His government of the day categorically denied that a genocide had taken place.

Such refusals were not uncommon. Many foreign players took the information provided to them with caution and were slow to act accordingly. But Switzerland’s shame was for having indirectly cooperated in an act against humanity.

History is the record of past events that can no longer be changed. It is more than people with knowledge of past events. It also requires more than a narrow understanding, which risks misinterpreting what really happened. It is something that, compared to similar events happening now, illuminates where we are, where we should stand, and what our next step should be.

With that in mind, do the Japanese government, businesses, financial institutions, investors and other actors know what their next step should be in the ongoing crackdown on ethnic minorities? Are they responding with the appropriate urgency?

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BRENHAM HERITAGE MUSEUM ANNOUNCES HISTORY LECTURE SERIES https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/brenham-heritage-museum-announces-history-lecture-series/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 16:06:07 +0000 https://arbeiasociety.org.uk/brenham-heritage-museum-announces-history-lecture-series/ [ad_1] The Brenham Heritage Museum is launching a new series of bi-monthly lunchtime lectures. The museum says it will bring experts on subjects of history and culture to Brenham for live appearances. Six speakers are featured in the lecture series, which is sponsored by longtime Brenham resident Seth McMeans and a member of the museum’s […]]]>

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The Brenham Heritage Museum is launching a new series of bi-monthly lunchtime lectures.

The museum says it will bring experts on subjects of history and culture to Brenham for live appearances.

Six speakers are featured in the lecture series, which is sponsored by longtime Brenham resident Seth McMeans and a member of the museum’s board of trustees. There may be a bonus conference later in the year.

The inaugural conference will take place on Monday February 28e at noon in the Bus Depot gallery at 313 East Alamo Street. It will be presented by Dr Andrea Roberts of Texas A&M University, who will explore half a dozen of Washington County’s largest free settlements.

Dr Roberts will provide background and details on the communities, which were created by people formerly enslaved in the decades following the Civil War. His lecture will accompany an exhibit that will be in place in the building at that time.

The second speaker is Texas historian James Bevill, known for his award-winning book The Republic of Paper. His presentation of Monday March 28e will cover his new book, Blackboards and bomb shelters: Americans’ perilous journey to China during World War II.

Museum Director Mike Vance said he was very excited about the lecture series and hopes people take the opportunity to hear in person from some of the state’s top writers and historians.

Lectures will take place on the fourth Monday of certain months from noon to 1 p.m. Participants can bring their own lunch or buy a sandwich on site. The first speakers will appear in the Bus Depot gallery, but as the renovation of the post office building progresses, the museum hopes to move the speakers to this building later in the year.

The series is free for all museum members and $ 5 for all others. For more details on museum memberships or the museum’s fundraising campaign, visit www.brenhamheritagemuseum.org.

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